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ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2000 | By Charles Huckabee, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The variety of organizations presenting chamber music is a strong point of the Philadelphia classical music scene. Series starting this weekend include the Trinity Center for Urban Life and the Gershman Y. Trinity Center is presenting an evensong concert at 6 tonight, featuring Patricia Stasis Winter, soprano; Marcus Kurz, clarinet; and David Shunskis, piano, in Schubert's Der Hirt auf dem Felsen (The Shepherd on the Rock, D. 965); and Kurz and Shunskis in Poulenc's Sonata for Clarinet and Piano.
NEWS
March 24, 2009 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Jos? Franch-Ballester is one of those musicians whose technique is something of a straw man. Yes, it's impressive that the clarinetist can glide through a series of notes so fast that they blur. But in Piazzolla's Oblivion, the second encore of Sunday afternoon's concert at the Trinity Center for Urban Life, the technique was only as good as the expressive thing it served, and it was very good. Piazzolla's effortlessly sexy work was just the thing to end the recital of Brahms, Prokofiev, Poulenc, and a fantasy on themes of Rigoletto.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1999 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
New life - a musical one - has risen from the ashes of the 1994 fire that nearly destroyed Trinity Memorial Church. The refurbished Trinity Center for Urban Life, not far from Rittenhouse Square, has a 20-concert series of its own, and has become a popular venue for several established ensembles. The "Early Music at Trinity" series opened its second season Sunday afternoon with Donna Fournier, whose short, fleet fingers moved across her viola da gamba to produce soft thuds and long soaring notes.
NEWS
June 5, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns and Inquirer Music Critic
During the course of its regular concert season, Dolce Suono Ensemble jumps off the high dive often enough that when these intrepid musicians take it easy, you're a little relieved for their sake — while resting assured that your own ears won't fall off from overuse. So it was in the Sunday concert at Trinity Center with particularly songful pieces by Mozart and Schubert, three of the pieces arranged for flute, cello, and piano accompaniment by no less than composer Steven Stucky.
NEWS
February 27, 2007 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Koji Attwood's 10 minutes of great substance arrived like a bolt of genius Sunday afternoon in a program otherwise offering fluff. It was high-quality fluff, to be sure - Rossini, Respighi and Martucci. But when Attwood, the pianist who has been taken under the wing of Astral Artistic Services, played three Scarlatti keyboard sonatas, everything else on the program shrank in stature. The pieces themselves (K. 11 in C minor, K. 101 in A major and K. 27 in B minor) are marvels of virtuosity, a quality realized elegantly by Attwood.
NEWS
September 10, 2012
If one purpose of the Philly Fringe is to try out iffy ideas under low-pressure, low-budget circumstances, then the update of Verdi's Falstaff that opened Saturday night came with plenty of lessons in operatic viability. Produced by Poor Richard's Opera, Verdi's high-traffic work about drunken, deluded Falstaff attempting to woo women in his declining years was reconceived by director Siddhartha Misra in modern dress, meaning that character expositions were enhanced by slide projections of Facebook profiles and the love duets consisted of two parties singing their text messages to each other.
NEWS
January 29, 2002 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Philadelphians have heard Nicolas Kendall grow up, first as a student at the Curtis Institute of Music, and now as a violinist who seems clearly poised for a substantial career. He's playing under the wing of Astral Artistic Services, the local group that helps major young talent find more major exposure, and at the same time is winning some important attention, such as a recent first prize from the prestigious Young Concert Artists. Sunday afternoon at the Trinity Center, in Schubert's Sonatina in D major for Violin and Piano, it was clear what all of these important barometers of talent sense in Kendall.
NEWS
September 27, 2005 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Just because Astral Artistic Services sometimes seems too good to be true doesn't grant it immunity from fallibility. In its high-concept season opener with the Haddonfield Chamber Orchestra at Trinity Center for Urban Life on Sunday, this service organization for young artists programmed oddly matched talents that moved the concert into some fairly dysfunctional digressions. The theme was the four seasons. Astral's Ayano Ninomiya may be the rare violinist with the right kind of fire in her belly for Vivaldi's overexposed The Four Seasons.
NEWS
October 6, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Spain was under Islamic rule for seven centuries until 1492, when its Christian leaders forced their Abrahamic cousins to convert or flee the country. Yet, more than 500 years later, Iberian culture still bears a profoundly Islamic and Arab influence. Nowhere is that more evident than in the southern region of Andalusia, which touches North Africa via the Strait of Gibraltar. The region's most famous modern poet, Federico García Lorca (1898-1936), infused his verses with a musical language both Spanish and Arabic.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Not all the eight composers made it to their world-premiere performances by the Dolce Suono Ensemble amid Sunday's freezing rain. Yet the event itself probably would have gone on amid a hurricane: Were founder Mimi Stillman easily deterred by circumstance, she wouldn't be celebrating the 10th-anniversary season of her flute-based chamber music series, much less staging a fairly extravagant tribute to her teacher, the late flute guru Julius Baker....
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2015 | By Matthew Westphal, For The Inquirer
Piffaro, Philadelphia's Renaissance wind band, celebrated a big anniversary this weekend. Not its own 30th (that's next season), but the 500th birthday of perhaps the most influential composer you've never heard of: Cipriano de Rore, the first to deliberately shape his music to the meaning and rhythm of the text being sung rather than using the words mostly as pegs for constructions of notes. With that change in emphasis, Rore transformed vocal music and made possible the birth of opera in the following century.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Not all the eight composers made it to their world-premiere performances by the Dolce Suono Ensemble amid Sunday's freezing rain. Yet the event itself probably would have gone on amid a hurricane: Were founder Mimi Stillman easily deterred by circumstance, she wouldn't be celebrating the 10th-anniversary season of her flute-based chamber music series, much less staging a fairly extravagant tribute to her teacher, the late flute guru Julius Baker....
NEWS
July 29, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Trinity Memorial Church at 22d and Spruce Streets was failing in the summer of 1994, and the few dozen remaining congregants knew it. They talked about selling off the oak pews, or even the chocolate-brown Victorian building itself, but the conversation kept going in circles. The members of the little Episcopal church just couldn't agree what to do. Then, in the midst of their collective soul-searching, the historic church and its congregation were saved, oddly enough, by a bolt of lightning.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Rescuing Edvard Grieg from his own reputation might prompt one to ask "Oh, really?" The composer of Peer Gynt and his enormously popular Piano Concerto is one of the most often heard classical composers of all time. But Astral Artists, in the final concert of its season of recitals by young professionals, provided a platform for ideas that older musicians might not risk. No question that pianist Ilya Poletaev had a point: Much Grieg is overlooked. The composer didn't help his two-hit-wonder reputation by leaving his opera unfinished, never really beginning his proposed second piano concerto, and giving some of his best efforts to vocal music in a difficult-to-sing hybrid Norwegian dialect.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Composers don't necessarily spin out ideas conveniently formatted for ensembles equipped to realize them. A lot of inspiration seeps out for instrumental combinations not neatly organized under the umbrella of an IRS-recognized nonprofit. So when a group like Astral Artists curates a concert like Sunday afternoon's "Astral in Wonderland" at the Trinity Center - mostly unfamiliar repertoire - that's cause for paying close attention, even if you don't necessarily like everything you hear.
NEWS
October 6, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Spain was under Islamic rule for seven centuries until 1492, when its Christian leaders forced their Abrahamic cousins to convert or flee the country. Yet, more than 500 years later, Iberian culture still bears a profoundly Islamic and Arab influence. Nowhere is that more evident than in the southern region of Andalusia, which touches North Africa via the Strait of Gibraltar. The region's most famous modern poet, Federico García Lorca (1898-1936), infused his verses with a musical language both Spanish and Arabic.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Does it matter why we hear the musicians we do? With its deep relationships and pedagogical bloodlines, Philadelphia risks a certain provincialism and clubbiness every time an artist steps out on stage. Astral Artists, though, is a vital hedge against that dynamic, expressed most recently on Sunday afternoon at the Trinity Center in the Philadelphia recital debut of Romie de Guise-Langlois. Where we're used to hearing refinement across all registers, this clarinetist argued for variety of tone.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2012
Special Events DEA Drug Take-Back Dispose of outdated and unused prescription and OTC drugs. Trinity Center for Urban Life, 2212 Spruce St.; 215-732-2515. 9/29. 10 am-2 pm. Gatsby in the Garden 'Great Gatsby'-themed party in celebration of the Rodin Museum's reopening. Entertainment, appetizers & drinks. Rodin Museum, Franklin Parkway at 22d St.; 215-763-8100. 9/28. 6:30-9 pm. Sold out. Germantown White House Exhibits Interactive exhibits featuring George Washington's family & household.
NEWS
September 10, 2012
If one purpose of the Philly Fringe is to try out iffy ideas under low-pressure, low-budget circumstances, then the update of Verdi's Falstaff that opened Saturday night came with plenty of lessons in operatic viability. Produced by Poor Richard's Opera, Verdi's high-traffic work about drunken, deluded Falstaff attempting to woo women in his declining years was reconceived by director Siddhartha Misra in modern dress, meaning that character expositions were enhanced by slide projections of Facebook profiles and the love duets consisted of two parties singing their text messages to each other.
NEWS
June 5, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns and Inquirer Music Critic
During the course of its regular concert season, Dolce Suono Ensemble jumps off the high dive often enough that when these intrepid musicians take it easy, you're a little relieved for their sake — while resting assured that your own ears won't fall off from overuse. So it was in the Sunday concert at Trinity Center with particularly songful pieces by Mozart and Schubert, three of the pieces arranged for flute, cello, and piano accompaniment by no less than composer Steven Stucky.
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