CollectionsTrojan Horse
IN THE NEWS

Trojan Horse

FIND MORE STORIES »
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 15, 1992 | By S.E. Siebert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It's been the target of anger and frustration in Upper Southampton. After several months, the battle of Gloria Dei Hilltop is over. It's up to the Upper Southampton Board of Supervisors to clear the smoke and declare the winner. After six hearings and more than 20 hours of discussion, the board wrapped up testimony Tuesday on the proposed 150-unit senior citizen apartment complex on Valley Hill Trail. The board is expected to announce its decision at its Nov. 10 meeting.
NEWS
August 3, 2016
By Jill M. Geer Before every Olympic Games, there is a continuous, inevitable stream of negativity and doomsday forecasting. The 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympic Games are not different. It is not my directive in this piece to recount the negativity. It is my directive to recount the personal, truthful, and positive ways the Olympic Games have helped change the world. The ancient Games began in the eighth century B.C. in Greece and changed the Panhellenic world by creating a truce between cities that would just as soon weaponize a Trojan horse as call a timeout on their conflicts.
NEWS
August 24, 2001
In recent years, law enforcement has begun using cameras for a multitude of purposes. One favorite is the red-light camera, which photographs the license plates of cars that run red lights, sending a ticket to a car's registered owner. Thirty cities employ cameras, and the number is growing. . . . [S]uch cameras are only steps away from those that can seek particular people or vehicles, can track the path of a car, or make records of a vehicle's travels. Such technology would pose significant threats to our Fourth Amendment rights .. . . If those who downplay Orwellian concerns don't listen, red-light cameras will be a Trojan horse that parades with fanfare onto our streets, only to surreptitiously rob us of our money and our rights.
NEWS
July 24, 2006
IN HIS July 14 letter, Sen. Rick Santorum's press person attacked me and showed the same loose interpretation of the facts as Santorum. Santorum's record on raising the minimum wage is abysmal. He has voted 13 times against raising the wage - casting one of these disgraceful votes as recently as last month. Mr. Traynham claims that Mr. Santorum sponsored a wage raise last year, but this amendment was in fact a Trojan horse to eliminate the 40-hour workweek and overtime pay. In addition, the measure would have prevented states from raising the minimum wage for restaurant employees.
NEWS
October 25, 2012
THE PRESIDENTIAL debates had no questions about the environment. I did hear about the future of our families, but Earth is shaping up with no future. Drilling for oil was a pretty big discussion in one debate, but only more drilling. Bacteria and virus are thriving, droughts are becoming more severe, temperatures are rising at an alarming rate, yet no candidate wants to discuss these issues. Studying to become an environmental scientist in college, I know my job outlook is good, but for all the wrong reasons.
NEWS
August 5, 1999
The Republicans in Congress have hammered out a federal tax-cut compromise, and it's a beaut. This 10-year extravaganza is just as unaffordable as before, but less blatantly generous toward the wealthy. And its little-publicized tax breaks for those already on corporate welfare are enough to warm the heart of many a Washington lobbyist. The plan would cost $792 billion over the next 10 years - out of an operating surplus that's highly unlikely to occur. The main gesture toward fiscal sanity is something the House of Representatives cooked up: The plan's income-tax cuts would halt if the annual cost of interest on the debt rises.
NEWS
January 4, 1999 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
Championships are no rarity in the 1900 block of South 3rd Street, but an unusual doubleheader in the 1999 Mummers Parade will keep the First Block of Mummery partying through next weekend. Bill McIntyre's Shooting Stars Fancy Brigade will host the Brigade Serenade Saturday night in front of their clubhouse at 1931 - an annual event at which other brigades salute the winning Stars with a costumed reprise of the New Year's parade. Sharing the spotlight and providing part of the soundtrack will be Quaker City String Band - its home is at 1943 - which captured first prize in its division with an imaginative Old Russia theme.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
'They're not human beings! They're beasts!" So proclaims a German officer in the thick of battle in War Horse , the Tony Award-culling spectacle that spends this week and next at the Academy of Music. Though the beasts in question are played by larger-than-life-size puppets, much of the audience at that point in the World War I saga would disagree vehemently. Thanks to the physical fluidity and expressive precision afforded by sophisticated puppetry, the war horses seem, at times, like superior alternatives to humanity.
NEWS
October 31, 2008
Broken promise Usually, politicians wait until they are elected before breaking their promises. But Barack Obama broke his pledge to the American people to support campaign finance reform and limit his campaign spending if his opponent did the same. He did it when he realized he could raise more money than anyone else - a record-shattering $639 million to date, nearing what Bush and Kerry combined raised in 2004. John McCain kept faith with voters and is now at a serious spending disadvantage.
NEWS
August 18, 2001 | By William Raspberry
Stuart Newberger is an exceptionally patient man, and it is not his fault that I didn't quite get the lesson he was at such pains to teach. I had called him because he, as a lawyer with the American Civil Liberties Union, is representing the seven families that sued to overturn Virginia's "moment of silence" statute. They lost and Newberger plans to appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court. All I wanted to know was: Why? How are your clients and their children harmed by a law that orders Virginia's public schools to set aside a minute each morning during which children may "meditate, pray or engage in other silent activity"?
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 3, 2016
By Jill M. Geer Before every Olympic Games, there is a continuous, inevitable stream of negativity and doomsday forecasting. The 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympic Games are not different. It is not my directive in this piece to recount the negativity. It is my directive to recount the personal, truthful, and positive ways the Olympic Games have helped change the world. The ancient Games began in the eighth century B.C. in Greece and changed the Panhellenic world by creating a truce between cities that would just as soon weaponize a Trojan horse as call a timeout on their conflicts.
NEWS
June 24, 2015
ATHENS, Greece - After a long, but too short, holiday in Greece, I came home changed, and not just by Grecian Formula. I enjoyed a period of introspection and reflection in a nation that gave the world democracy, philosophy, the Olympics, Aristotle, Plato, tzatziki and baklava. After sitting at the Parthenon for hours, then cruising the myth-laden Greek Islands for days, I realized that so much of what I am is rooted here. So I use this forum to announce - move over George Stephanopoulos and Jennifer Aniston - I identify as Greek and wish to be regarded as Greek.
SPORTS
June 5, 2015 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Sports Columnist
IF YOU READ only about the Trojan Horse, you might be entertained, but you would not get the full tale of the Trojan War. Both are great stories. So yesterday, Eagles running backs coach Duce Staley knew one of the topics coming at him would be about former Eagles running back LeSean McCoy and the firestorm he caused by implying head coach Chip Kelly got rid of him because he got rid of "all the good black players. " Not only had Staley, a former Eagles running back, worked closely with McCoy for the last two seasons, but he also is in the position of being the only African-American lead assistant coach on Kelly's staff.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
'They're not human beings! They're beasts!" So proclaims a German officer in the thick of battle in War Horse , the Tony Award-culling spectacle that spends this week and next at the Academy of Music. Though the beasts in question are played by larger-than-life-size puppets, much of the audience at that point in the World War I saga would disagree vehemently. Thanks to the physical fluidity and expressive precision afforded by sophisticated puppetry, the war horses seem, at times, like superior alternatives to humanity.
NEWS
October 25, 2012
THE PRESIDENTIAL debates had no questions about the environment. I did hear about the future of our families, but Earth is shaping up with no future. Drilling for oil was a pretty big discussion in one debate, but only more drilling. Bacteria and virus are thriving, droughts are becoming more severe, temperatures are rising at an alarming rate, yet no candidate wants to discuss these issues. Studying to become an environmental scientist in college, I know my job outlook is good, but for all the wrong reasons.
NEWS
October 31, 2008
Broken promise Usually, politicians wait until they are elected before breaking their promises. But Barack Obama broke his pledge to the American people to support campaign finance reform and limit his campaign spending if his opponent did the same. He did it when he realized he could raise more money than anyone else - a record-shattering $639 million to date, nearing what Bush and Kerry combined raised in 2004. John McCain kept faith with voters and is now at a serious spending disadvantage.
NEWS
January 12, 2007 | By GLORIA C. ENDRES
THE NO CHILD Left Behind Act, which is 5 years old, is up for reauthorization this year or next, depending on the politics. But it's not too early to be giving it a very skeptical look. It was passed by a bipartisan vote, signed by President Bush and imposed on U.S. public schools as a mandate for reform. It was first implemented by then-Secretary of Education Roderick Paige, once superintendent of Houston schools and who helped elect Bush in 2000. Remember Paige? He's the guy who called the National Education Association a "terrorist organization.
NEWS
July 24, 2006
IN HIS July 14 letter, Sen. Rick Santorum's press person attacked me and showed the same loose interpretation of the facts as Santorum. Santorum's record on raising the minimum wage is abysmal. He has voted 13 times against raising the wage - casting one of these disgraceful votes as recently as last month. Mr. Traynham claims that Mr. Santorum sponsored a wage raise last year, but this amendment was in fact a Trojan horse to eliminate the 40-hour workweek and overtime pay. In addition, the measure would have prevented states from raising the minimum wage for restaurant employees.
BUSINESS
January 12, 2006 | By Jeff Gelles INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania consumers who have been wrongly billed for mysterious international calls - sometimes at rates as high as $8 a minute - are entitled to a full refund of the charges under a settlement announced yesterday between Pennsylvania and three out-of-state companies. State Consumer Advocate Irwin A. "Sonny" Popowsky said the calls were made by the consumers' computers after they unintentionally downloaded so-called Trojan-horse programs. Such programs, also known as "modem hijackers" or "dialers," can install themselves when a user responds to a spam e-mail or clicks on a pop-up ad, and possibly in other circumstances.
NEWS
November 26, 2003 | By Sens. Jon S. Corzine and Frank Lautenberg
If you believe the spin from the Bush administration, the Republican leadership in Congress, and the national leadership of the AARP, the Medicare bill that passed yesterday is a good deal for New Jersey seniors and the Medicare program. But spin and facts are two different things. And here are some of the facts: The bill will: Force thousands of New Jersey seniors out of Medicare as they know it into HMO plans; Result in more than 90,000 New Jersey retired seniors losing their drug coverage from their former employers; Cut more than $550 million from cancer treatment in New Jersey to pay for rural health care elsewhere; Do too little to contain drug costs, and, remarkably, not go into effect until the year 2006.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|