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Troubled Waters

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NEWS
August 6, 2002
HOW MANY city employees does it take to paint a bathroom? A few to paint, and one to drain the pool. A better question: How long does it take to fix a swimming pool? The pool at the Lee Rec Center and 10 others in the city began major repair and renovation work in October. So far, just four have reopened; five have been rescheduled for next year. Lee is due to open this week. Lee's original June 25 opening date was delayed, but it was due to open last week until Recreation Commissioner Vic Richard decided that the bathrooms and poolhouse needed work.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2007 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Of the nine seafaring souls who, in 1968, left Britain to compete in a nonstop solo sail around the world, Donald Crowhurst was surely the least experienced, the least prepared. A mild-mannered electronics engineer who lived with his wife and children in the English countryside, Crowhurst appears in Louise Osmond and Jerry Rothwell's fascinating documentary, Deep Water, as a man out of his depth, so to speak. Crowhurst built a swift trimaran equipped with the latest gadgets. It boasted a self-righting mechanism, in case his three-hulled vessel flipped into stormy waters of the southern capes.
BUSINESS
July 8, 1999 | By Lisa Suhay, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
What began 15 years ago as an environmental project at a New Jersey college has blossomed into a business that has given its founders a steady income and a suntan. "In grad school, we were working on a project to help local residents deal with the stagnancy of their lakes and ponds," said environmental scientist Larry Kovar, now 44. "People were asking for our advice, and I saw it as an opportunity to help people out and broaden my horizons. " The business, Aquatic Analysts, of Middleville, N.J., was started by Kovar and Michael Sebetich, a professor of aquatic ecology at William Patterson College in Wayne, Passaic County.
NEWS
July 14, 1994 | By Savannah Blackwell, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After years of pleading with municipal officials and searching for financial backing, one resident finally has his wish - a new Monument Avenue bridge. To the delight of Jack Haage, Upper Moreland and Hatboro officials announced last week that they had reached an agreement detailing how much each town will pay for what part of the project to replace the bridge and its awkwardly placed abutment. The creek is part of the border between the municipalities. It took Haage three years to convince Upper Moreland commissioners that the abutment, which was erected by Hatboro several years ago, acts like a dam that - during heavy rains - backed up water into his home and those of his neighbors.
NEWS
July 12, 1992 | By Michael E. Ruane, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Out by Halfway Island, two great blue herons rise from the carpet of willow grass, disturbed by the intrusion. As it passes the tip of the island, the little boat bothers the Susquehanna River, but gently, with the swish of its paddle wheel and the lapping of water under the bow. Sometimes, too, the strains of Schubert's Unfinished Symphony will drift from Jack Dillman's radio in the pilot house and mix with the music of the ferry and...
NEWS
March 14, 2001
In just a few weeks, arguments among "faith-based" organizations have reminded us why our Founders decided to separate church and state. The Anti-Defamation League kicked off the festivities by declaring that because of anti-Semitic preachings, the Nation of Islam should get no government money from the new Office of Faith-based Initiatives - although if past anti-Jewish comments are the issue, most Christian denominations also would be disqualified....
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1986 | By RENEE V. LUCAS, Daily News Staff Writer
"The Prisoner of Second Avenue," a comedy by Neil Simon. Directed by Tom Markus, lighting by Richard Moore, costumes by Lana Fritz. Presented by the Walnut Street Theatre, 9th and Walnut streets, Tue.-Sun. through Nov. 22. Anyone in his right mind knows that a recently fired 46-year-old advertising account executive having a nervous breakdown is not a laughing matter. So why was last night's Walnut Street Theatre audience a packed house of titters, giggles, chuckles and guffaws?
SPORTS
November 8, 1995 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
Get this straight: The officiating was sporadic, erratic, sometimes inexplicable. The 76ers, in a 109-106 loss to the Sacramento Kings, were worse. All the elements coach John Lucas had been pleading for - a defensive presence, more efficient ball movement, better shooting, more people contributing - were missing. Make up for the 21 points injured Clarence Weatherspoon had been averaging? Not a chance. Establish a home-court advantage? Uh, no. But get this straight, too: Whatever replacement refs Eric Britto and William Kennedy were doing, it wasn't working.
SPORTS
February 1, 1988 | By TIM KAWAKAMI, Daily News Sports Writer
Stirred but not shaken, John Elway walked off the title field once again the loser, once again left only to shake his head and keep his gaze steady in the spotlight. And later he answered the inevitable questions calmly, gently, rationally - and only occasionally bitterly - in the aftermath of his team's second consecutive embarrassment in the Super Bowl. He even smiled some, which belied the day he had, the game that was summarily wrenched from his grasp, the 42-10 nightmare that overwhelmed his Denver Bronocs team.
SPORTS
May 29, 1987 | By PAUL HAGEN, Daily News Sports Writer
It is fashionable these days to wonder aloud whether Rick Schu ever will follow Mike Schmidt in anything but alphabetical order for the Phillies. This heir apparent stuff gets old after a while, especially as a player gets older and a curious sort of self-fulfilling prophecy sets in. First a guy is great, gets rave reviews. Good enough to start almost anywhere else, the team assures one and all. It's just a darn shame for the kid that the team (in this case the Phillies) has a player of that caliber (in this case Schmidt)
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NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - For the second time in as many months, a panel of state senators on Tuesday chose to not endorse one of Gov. Wolf's cabinet nominees - amid signs that steeper odds await the next one. After a hearing, the Environmental Resources and Energy Committee declined to take a position on acting Secretary of Environmental Protection John Quigley before moving his nomination to the full Senate for consideration. Forwarding the nomination without open support is an unusual step and reflects friction between the first-term Democrat and the Republican-controlled legislature as they embark on budget negotiations.
NEWS
March 3, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna and Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
To accomplish the first-term agenda that would burnish his image as a pragmatic leader, Gov. Christie relied on an ally across the aisle: Senate President Stephen Sweeney. The Gloucester County Democrat backed the Republican governor on initiatives Christie would count among his key successes: requirements that public workers pay more toward their pensions, limits on police and fire salary increases reached through arbitration, and a property-tax cap. Now, their partnership appears to be hitting a rough patch: Christie wants more changes to the state pension system, while Sweeney says Christie is picking an unnecessary battle with public workers.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2013 | By Merilyn Jackson, For The Inquirer
Last weekend's Invisible River - an aerial dance/music project to be staged under and around the Strawberry Mansion Bridge by Alie Vidich & the Brigade - nearly became Invisible Dance . Though Vidich and her team had worked for eight months to secure permits through the Fairmount Park Special Events Office, the bridges division of the City Streets Department, and the state Fish and Boat Commission, no one told them they also needed to notify...
BUSINESS
October 2, 2011 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
With three area oil refineries potentially shutting down by next July, the fallout on commerce on the Delaware River will be staggering. Recent decisions by Sunoco Inc. to sell or close its South Philadelphia and Marcus Hook refineries and by ConocoPhillips to shut down, if it can't sell, its Trainer, Delaware County, refinery have given fresh fodder to opponents of deepening the Delaware River navigation channel. Delaware Riverkeeper Maya van Rossum fired off a letter Thursday to the Army Corps of Engineers in Philadelphia, demanding a redo of the cost-benefit calculation of the $300 million channel dredging.
NEWS
May 24, 2010 | By Chelsea Conaboy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Gillooly family of Cherry Hill has made tough budget decisions to save money this summer. That extra week at the Shore? Cut. A $685 membership to the private Barclay Farm swim club? Stays. "When you parse that out over the whole summer, it's so cheap for all of us," said Anne Gillooly. Other families are choosing differently. Total members in at least eight of the 13 clubs in Cherry Hill, including Barclay Farm, fell last year, according to the Cherry Hill Association of Pools.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2008
This distinctive documentary follows Hurricane Katrina survivors Scott Roberts and Kimberly Rivers Roberts, residents of New Orleans' Ninth Ward. Mixing camcorder and hand-held footage with news clips, the film lays bare the unthinkable human toll the 2005 storm took on those too poor or otherwise unable to evacuate the city. The film follows the couple through the storm, huddling in an attic without electricity, and in the months afterward as they become FEMA refugees.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2007 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Of the nine seafaring souls who, in 1968, left Britain to compete in a nonstop solo sail around the world, Donald Crowhurst was surely the least experienced, the least prepared. A mild-mannered electronics engineer who lived with his wife and children in the English countryside, Crowhurst appears in Louise Osmond and Jerry Rothwell's fascinating documentary, Deep Water, as a man out of his depth, so to speak. Crowhurst built a swift trimaran equipped with the latest gadgets. It boasted a self-righting mechanism, in case his three-hulled vessel flipped into stormy waters of the southern capes.
NEWS
August 28, 2007 | By Paul Nussbaum and Dylan Purcell INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
River Road, the bucolic, winding Bucks County highway along the Delaware River, has more troubled bridges than any road in Southeastern Pennsylvania, according to state data released yesterday. River Road, a favorite of autumn leaf viewers and weekend visitors, has 16 bridges rated as bad as or worse than the Minnesota bridge that collapsed this month. Throughout the five-county Pennsylvania region, there are 404 bridges that, like the Minnesota bridge, are designated "structurally deficient" and rated at or below 50 percent on a sufficiency scale.
NEWS
November 29, 2006 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia's troubled water billing system is on the road to recovery following an agreement reached earlier this month between the city and software giant Oracle Corp. The project had been stalled for more than a year after it become apparent that the new billing system was flawed - despite $18 million in taxpayer money that was spent on building it over a three-year period. Known as Project Ocean, it was to replace the antiquated, 30-year-old system that is currently used to bill half a million customers of the Philadelphia Water Department.
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