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Trout

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July 23, 2011
G    AB     R H    RBI    BB SO    AVG.   10     34     5     6     2     3       8     .176
NEWS
April 21, 1988 | By Dave Caldwell, Inquirer Staff Writer
With silent splendor, it slices serpentine through a sophisticated city and its surrounding suburbs. It offers its visitors a sylvan serenity, a place to escape the headlines and the deadlines of everyday living. It is the Wissahickon Creek, a waterway that meanders from central Montgomery County through Fairmount Park before it empties into the Schuylkill between Manayunk and East Falls. And it offers some prime places to tangle with trout. "When you're along the Wissahickon Creek, you can kind of blot the city out of your mind," said Sally Corl, the state Fish Commission waterways conservation officer for Philadelphia County.
NEWS
April 20, 1989 | By Dan Hardy, Special to The Inquirer
It was 6:30 a.m., the first day of trout fishing season, and the countdown was on - only 90 minutes to go before the first fishing line hit the water. Along the banks of the Ridley Creek, the Chester Creek and the Darby Creek early Saturday, small clusters of anglers huddled together, talking about who would catch the first fish, and who would get the biggest. It was drizzling in the chilly pre-dawn darkness, but that didn't seem to bother the waiting groups. The anglers waiting by the Ridley Creek on Knowlton Road in Middletown Township included Danny Massi, a machinist from Chester, who said that for the last 14 years, he has started trout season at the same spot.
NEWS
November 17, 1991 | By Kathi Kauffman, Special to The Inquirer
The Lower Merion-Narberth Watershed Association is looking for volunteers willing to roll up their sleeves and get wet. At noon Saturday, the association will begin planting about 7,000 brown- trout eggs in Mill Creek. The boxes that hold the eggs, Vibert boxes, will be placed in areas of the stream that are well-aerated from consistent water flows. Watershed members will work with volunteers to map out placement of the boxes, which hold 500 eggs apiece. Volunteers will cover the boxes with large stones and anchor them to form egg beds for the trout.
SPORTS
April 6, 1997 | By Stephen J. Morgan, FOR THE INQUIRER
From the crowded creeks of Philadelphia and its suburbs to the seldom-fished headwater streams of northern Pennsylvania, anglers will fan out across the state Saturday for the opening of trout season. If you have never fished for trout before or are a veteran who wants to brush up on the basics, here are some facts you need to know: Anglers are allowed to keep eight trout daily on most waters during the regular season, which begins at 8 a.m. Saturday and runs through Sept.
SPORTS
April 14, 1996 | By Stephen J. Morgan, FOR THE INQUIRER
Anglers will enjoy a bonus of extra stocked fish when the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission begins its second round of spring trout-stocking this week. Officials learned that they had 150,000 additional yearling trout on hand after taking inventory at the agency's 10 hatcheries, said Dan Tredinnick, a commission spokesman. The 8- and 9-inch fish exceed the minimum legal size limit (7 inches). Each year, the commission produces fish above its planned stocking target to ensure that it is able to replace trout that die in hatcheries before stocking commences.
NEWS
September 25, 1989 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Arms talks gave way to trout fishing yesterday morning, and when Secretary of State James A. Baker 3d and Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze climbed from the river, it was Yanks 3, Reds 0. Baker, an avid fisherman, stood chest-deep in the Snake River and caught and released three cutthroat trout in the space of five minutes. Shevardnadze stood on the bank and struggled with the rod lent to him by the National Park Service, trying to master the art of spin-casting. He awkwardly plunked several casts in the grass at his feet.
NEWS
April 24, 1988 | By Chris Panzetta, Special to The Inquirer Inquirer Staff Writer Sergio Bustos contributed to this article
Calendars notwithstanding, spring for thousands of people in Southeastern Pennsylvania began at 8 a.m. on April 16. It was the opening day of trout season, and anglers of all ages descended on waterways throughout Bucks, Delaware, Montgomery, Chester and Philadelphia Counties. Pennsylvania issues more than 1 million fishing licenses a year, according to the state Fish Commission. But the number of anglers might be twice that, the commission said, because children younger than 16 don't need licenses and a number of Pennsylvanians don't bother to obtain the $12 one-year license, choosing to take their chances that they won't be caught.
NEWS
April 16, 1999 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The trout season is off the hook. Right before Pennsylvania anglers wade into the streams tomorrow, the state has decided the trout aren't too toxic to eat. Just last week, officials revealed that thousands of hatchery-raised trout already stocked into waterways - including some in Montgomery and Chester counties - were tainted with polychlorinated biphenyls, known as PCBs. But after running more tests, the state said yesterday the trout are safe to put on the table - despite traces of PCBs in trout shipped to Philadelphia, Bucks, Delaware and other counties.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1986 | By Ben Callaway, Inquirer Staff Writer
The start of trout season is an annual rite of spring that will involve more than a million Pennsylvanians tomorrow, beginning at 8 a.m. But trout fishing these days is not the kind of thing described in classical outdoors literature, and nothing like days long gone but not forgotten. Decreasing water quality and increasing pressure by anglers have created a put-and-take, hatchery-oriented fishery that some feel is a triumph of quantity over quality. Stocking fish has become necessary in most public waters because trout do not produce themselves in great number naturally in these surroundings.
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SPORTS
June 9, 2016 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, STAFF WRITER
NEW YORK - As he mindlessly shagged balls in the vast Yankee Stadium outfield Monday afternoon, that recent rumor about Mike Trout didn't seem so crazy at all. Three weeks ago, a Boston newspaper suggested the scuffling Los Angeles Angels were considering moving their Roy Hobbs-ian centerfielder. If they did, it said, the Yankees would be the most logical destination. Now, on this blue-sky afternoon, as he stood where Joe DiMaggio and Mickey Mantle had become Yankee legends - center field in the Bronx - Trout was framed by the magnitude of that pin-striped possibility.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
Beneath the rippling reflection of budding trees, brown trout in Valley Creek wriggled and splashed, invigorated by spring's warming waters. "It's a neat little ecosystem here," said Matt Stutzman, a biologist from Coatesville fishing at a bend in the creek. "It's rare. " The Tredyffrin Township waterway - rated an exceptional stream by the state in part because it supports a self-sustaining trout population - is one of the few where wild trout thrive so close to a big city. The creek is hallowed water to fisherman, who worry about a proposed highway expansion near the blue-ribbon stream.
SPORTS
July 16, 2015 | By Jake Kaplan, Inquirer Staff Writer
CINCINNATI - Mike Trout's first career All-Star Game at-bat, in 2012 at Kansas City's Kauffman Stadium, resulted in a single to center field. His first at-bats in each of his next two All-Star Games ended in a double and triple, respectively. So it was only fitting for baseball's best all-around player to complete his de facto All-Star Game cycle on Tuesday night at Great American Ball Park, sending the fourth pitch of the 86th midsummer classic the opposite way and over the right-field wall.
SPORTS
July 15, 2015 | By Jake Kaplan, Inquirer Staff Writer
CINCINNATI - Mike Trout won't turn 24 until August, but this week the Los Angeles Angels superstar finds himself as more of a veteran amid the next wave of baseball's young stars. Trout, who will start his third straight All-Star Game on Tuesday night at Great American Ball Park, laughed Monday when it was mentioned that he is no longer the youngest player on the field. "You know, it's good to have young talent in here, guys who come in and make an impact for their team," the Millville native said.
SPORTS
May 18, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
BALTIMORE - Mike Trout leaped high at the wall to snatch an apparent home run in the 10th inning. He made a shoestring catch and threw out the potential go-ahead runner with a 200-foot strike to home plate in the 11th inning. But his most remarkable feat on Wednesday night in Southern California - although he accomplished it with typical big-league, superstar aplomb - might have been making the red-eye flight home to the East Coast to spend Thursday in his hometown of Millville.
SPORTS
January 5, 2015 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
MIKE TROUT'S ascension from promising prospect to multitalented major league All-Star to the game's greatest current player took all of about 12 months. And the Millville Meteor's meteoric rise happened nearly 2 1/2 years ago. But baseball's award voters and the public relations machine that was The Official Retirement of Derek Jeter Throughout All of Major League Baseball meant Trout apparently had to wait his turn for validation. All Trout did in his first two full seasons was hit .324 with a 976 OPS, hit 57 home runs, steal 82 bases and score 238 runs.
SPORTS
December 31, 2014
AMERICAN LEAGUE Most Valuable Player Mike Trout, of the Los Angeles Angels, a native of Millville, N.J., will be honored as the Outstanding Pro Athlete of the Year by the Philadelphia Sports Writers Association at its 111th annual banquet on Jan. 16 at Cherry Hill's Crowne Plaza Hotel. Trout, who has not yet confirmed his attendance, also won the award 2 years ago after he was named the AL's Rookie of the Year. The 23-year-old, who became the youngest unanimous MVP pick in major league history, was a huge crowd favorite in May when he played here against the Phillies.
SPORTS
November 14, 2014 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
This baseball season was something different for Mike Trout. The Los Angeles Angels outfielder hit for more power than in his first two seasons. He struck out more often and stole fewer bases. Trout drove in more runs. He generated more extra-base hits. He flourished in big games, leading the Angels to the best record in baseball and the American League West title. Trout, the 23-year-old Millville High School graduate, was a slightly different player in 2014. He was something else as well: the American League's most valuable player.
SPORTS
July 16, 2014 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
MINNEAPOLIS - The game's best young hitter smashed 22 homers in the season's first 90 games - more than any of the 10 sluggers who swung in Monday night's Home Run Derby - but Mike Trout was nothing more than a spectator for it all. A reluctant one at that. "A lot of guys are giving me crap about it, not doing it," Trout said. "But eventually, I'll probably do it. " The Millville native insinuated that Angels manager Mike Scioscia discouraged Trout from participating. Trout was never selected.
SPORTS
May 15, 2014 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mike Trout woke up Tuesday at home. In a way, Trout ended one of the more eventful days of his professional baseball career in the same place. Trout was a member of the visiting team at Citizens Bank Park as the star centerfielder for the Los Angeles Angels. But given the sea of red "Trout 27" jerseys and T-shirts in the stands, the cheers that followed the mention of his name, and all the trappings of "Millville Night" in the stadium, it surely wasn't a typical road game for the 22-year-old former Phillies fan. "I love it here," Trout said during an engaging, 30-minute news conference in the Phillies' media room.
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