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Truancy

NEWS
October 31, 2004 | By Adam Fifield INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Wearing baseball caps and long T-shirts, about 20 students wedged themselves behind desks in a classroom on a Saturday afternoon. One girl wearing a corduroy jacket admitted to the group that she liked to watch other students fight. "So I can see who gets beat," she said. But when asked whether they wanted to go to school in a peaceful environment, nearly all their hands went up. These students were not in detention but had given up a day off to attend the Philadelphia School District's second annual student antiviolence conference at Drexel University.
NEWS
October 25, 2002 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In an effort to boost attendance and academic achievement, the Philadelphia School District plans to hire about 250 parents to help find truant students in their communities. The parents will be hired and trained by a dozen community and faith-based organizations, which the district plans to appoint early in November. The parents will earn $8 to $10 an hour and work 20 to 30 hours a week. The new force of truant officers will begin work Dec. 2. District chief executive Paul Vallas provided these details yesterday as he laid out his plan to crack down on truancy in the 200,000-student district.
NEWS
February 2, 2007 | By David T. Shulick
In the early 1900s, criminologists noted that almost a quarter of young male offenders had a history of skipping school. Social scientists thus labeled truancy the "kindergarten of crime. " More than 100 years later, the issue of truancy has become paramount across the country. And on Nov. 30, 2006, when Mayor John F. Street admonished hundreds of repeatedly truant students and their parents at the Liacouras Center, it became evident that this growing trend plagues the City of Brotherly Love as well.
NEWS
December 23, 1999 | By Michael Stoll, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Declaring war on truancy and delinquency, Delaware County is expanding its network of case workers and psychologists who will work exclusively with students who cut school. The half-million-dollar Truancy and Delinquency Prevention Partnership, which has been operating in some schools since last school year, will go countywide early next year. It will coordinate anti-truancy efforts in the schools, courts, county government and private nonprofit groups. "Truancy begets delinquency," said Edward Maguire, president and chief executive of the Child Guidance Resource Centers, the Media-based partnership's lead agency.
NEWS
September 12, 1997 | By Douglas Herbert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT Correspondent Raphael Lewis contributed to this article
A Delaware County pilot program aimed at reducing juvenile delinquency will punish truants in the Rose Tree Media School District by making them perform community service at school. The program will apply to the district's Penncrest High School in Middletown Township. Under the state's two-year-old truancy law, juveniles found to have unlawfully missed three days of school are technically subject to a host of penalties. These range from a $300 fine and temporary suspension of their driver's licenses to community service and a counseling program - or a combination of all four.
NEWS
April 3, 2000 | By Melia Bowie, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Twenty parents nibbled snacks and milled around an Abington Memorial Hospital Health Center classroom in Willow Grove, ready to talk about "blanche," "pearly gates," and "tears of gold. " "These are just some new terms, so you know what to look out for," said Elaine Shannon, co-coordinator of the Abington-Willow Grove chapter of Because I Love You, a national support group for parents with troubled children of all ages. With carefully typed lists of the latest slang for marijuana, LSD and cocaine, Shannon circulated among the group's members, who have been thrust into their children's battles with drugs and alcohol, physical and verbal abuse, truancy, teen pregnancy, and criminal activity.
NEWS
February 18, 1993 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT Inquirer correspondent Cynthia McGroarty contributed to this article
With a daily Chester High School absentee rate approaching 40 percent, Chester city officials are focusing their anti-truancy efforts on a new group: Store owners. Under an ordinance police are now enforcing, owners face fines of up to $500 if they let school-age children stay in their businesses more than 15 minutes during school hours. "This says to young people, 'You should be in school,' and it says to the businesses, 'You should not allow students to stay in your business,' " said Police Chief James Clark, who proposed the measure to the City Council.
NEWS
March 30, 2010 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Every day, about 12,000 Philadelphia students are out of school with no excuse. Every year, the Philadelphia School District, city courts, and the Department of Human Services spend $15 million on truancy-prevention programs. Historically, a lack of coordination among the three means that many students still slip through the cracks - leading not just to truants, but also to dropouts. There are about 95,000 children under DHS care in city schools and in out-of-school programs.
NEWS
March 19, 2003 | By Ralph Vigoda INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It took a day before her father was able to post bail, leaving her to spend an uncomfortable night in the Delaware County prison. She still faces fines and more time in court. Her travails result not so much from what she has done, but what she has failed to do: ensure that her child goes to school. The woman's 15-year-old son, the oldest of four children, is a chronic truant from Upper Darby High School. Through February, he had missed 66 days. That's a dangerous thing to do in the Upper Darby School District, where truancy is taken very seriously.
NEWS
March 30, 1998 | By Happy Fernandez
We all have seen them hanging out on the corner during the school day. On any given day in Philadelphia, 30,000 public school students are not in school. Why? The reasons are varied and often harrowing. But there is good news to report. The City of Philadelphia is embarking on a renewed effort to reduce truancy - and it's working. Reducing truancy is an effective crime reduction measure and a proven tool to help protect our kids from crime and violence. Truancy is an early warning sign, a signal of possible trouble at home, at school or in the neighborhood.
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