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Truancy

NEWS
February 2, 2007 | By David T. Shulick
In the early 1900s, criminologists noted that almost a quarter of young male offenders had a history of skipping school. Social scientists thus labeled truancy the "kindergarten of crime. " More than 100 years later, the issue of truancy has become paramount across the country. And on Nov. 30, 2006, when Mayor John F. Street admonished hundreds of repeatedly truant students and their parents at the Liacouras Center, it became evident that this growing trend plagues the City of Brotherly Love as well.
NEWS
January 11, 2007
RE COUNCILMAN Goode's comments to schools CEO Paul Vallas: I agree with the councilman that truancy is a major problem. But does the councilman have a solution? Does he really think the school district can fix truancy? If he were superintendent, would truancy disappear? Councilman Goode's father was the city's chief executive for eight years. Was Goode Sr. any less committed than his son to getting kids in school? Despite the fact that the "brothers and sisters run the city," truancy, drug-trafficking and homicide are an ongoing plague.
NEWS
December 16, 2006 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's five minutes into Greg Patton's workday, and he's already got five customers on the truancy bus. "It's a busy morning," said Patton, who oversees the Philadelphia School District's daily sweeps for school-skipping students. Two weeks ago, Mayor Street declared war on truancy, threatening parents of children who miss school with jail time and stiff fines. Patton expected the highly publicized push would yield fewer students on the streets. But even the mayor's sharp words have meant no real change so far. There was a bump in the number of truants immediately after Street made his announcement, but it has leveled off to about 200 truants picked up daily.
NEWS
December 15, 2006
WHAT'S the big uproar over the truancy problem? For more than 50 years, Democrats have been in control of Philadelphia, telling people that their situation was someone else's fault. And they keep saying it's the government's duty to provide everyone's needs, from cradle to grave. Now they want the kids to do something for themselves (like learning). How hypocritical is that? Tom Bell, Philadelphia
NEWS
December 4, 2006
THE STUDENT SHALL: Attend school and all assigned class periods every day. Arrive at school and every class period on time. Obey all school rules, dress codes and behave appropriately at school. Complete and return all homework as directed. THE PARENT/GUARDIAN SHALL: Ensure the child gets to school every day and on time. Not remove the child from school early without providing the school with a valid excuse. Ensure that any student absences are for legitimate, excused reasons only.
NEWS
December 4, 2006
EXCUSES. EXCUSES. It used to be the children who were full of them. These days, it's often parents who are adept at blaming everyone and everything except themselves when it comes to their children, school and truancy. The gripes and grumbles we heard last week from the thousands of parents at Temple's Liacouras Center gave the distinct impression that the school district's truancy problem is as much a case of absent kids as it is of absent parents. Then again, much of the parental grumbling might be chalked up to the command summons they got from the the city's ultimate principal, Mayor Street.
NEWS
December 2, 2006 | By Martha Woodall, Susan Snyder and Dafney Tales INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Greg Patton had expected to find fewer students on the street skipping school the morning after Mayor Street warned thousands of parents and students of a truancy crackdown. Jail time and fines await parents whose children continue to miss school. The message was all over the city - in yesterday's newspapers and on radio and television. But on the street, "It was business as usual," said Patton, who oversees truancy sweeps for the school district every weekday morning. Working from yesterday's base at SEPTA's Frankford Terminal, city police, school police and SEPTA police picked up 58 truants - part of a total of 210 citywide - a typical roundup.
NEWS
December 1, 2006 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mayor Street told thousands of parents of chronic truants - ordered to appear at a woodshed session at the Liacouras Center last night or face jail time - that they would be smart to take advantage of their last chance for amnesty. From now on, he said, Philadelphia School District students with more than three unexcused absences will get a home visit from a truant officer. And parents whose children rack up eight or more illegal absences could find themselves in weekend parenting classes, hauled before a judge, or even in a jail cell.
NEWS
November 17, 2006
PHILADELPHIA, open your eyes, check the clock, and pick up your phone. Your actions could impact the lives of thousands of kids, and our city's crime rate, both right now and years down the road. If you see a school-age kid during school hours hanging out on the street - or in the mall or near the corner store - call 215-400-SAFE. Report the truant. Stop trouble before it starts, or it grows up to become bigger trouble. Playing hooky sounds like light-hearted fun. But for many kids, it becomes a way of life.
NEWS
November 16, 2006 | By Kristen A. Graham and Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
City and school district officials announced a war on truancy yesterday, pledging $3 million in new money and 400 new employees to expand Philadelphia's efforts to get wayward students back into classrooms. At the center of the effort - backed by Mayor Street and Philadelphia schools chief Paul Vallas - is a dramatic jump in the number of parent truancy officers who contact families by phone and visit homes to get students to return to school. There are 100 parent truancy officers.
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