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Truancy

NEWS
March 10, 2003 | By Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Praising parents one moment and wagging a stern finger at them the next, Mayor Street said yesterday that legal guardians should participate more in public education. At the very least, he implored, parents must make sure their children do not cut school. Those who can't manage that much should be "punished and disciplined. " "I think that we should be hauling some of these parents into court," Street said at the "Year of the Child" celebration, an annual event held yesterday at the Liacouras Center at Temple University.
NEWS
February 19, 2003 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lorie Moore was in sixth grade when she first skipped a day of school, and she typed an excuse note on the family's new typewriter. "I told the teacher my mother allowed me to type it," said Moore, who went on to play hooky 25 or so days more in high school. (But shhh, don't tell her mother.) Fast-forward 30 years. Moore, now 41 and a parent of two school-age children, is on the front lines of the Philadelphia School District's latest tactic to combat truancy. As one of about 170 parent truant officers, she walks the city streets where she grew up and visits the homes of wayward students who have not shown up for school and have no excuse.
NEWS
November 9, 2002 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A dozen community groups and other agencies were selected yesterday to hire and oversee parents to act as truancy officers as part of Philadelphia's campaign to reduce the number of students who skip school. Twenty-six groups had applied for the job. Those chosen include social-service agencies and faith-based organizations. District Chief Executive Officer Paul G. Vallas, who announced the program last month, said the parent officers would be his "foot soldiers" in the fight to curtail truancy.
NEWS
November 4, 2002
It's important to keep an open mind My own impression of the TV terrorism "experts" that Lillian Swanson warns her readers to be wary of ("Media, police and public are in this together," Oct. 28) is that many of them are actually far more interested in terrorizing a captive audience with gloom and doom and perpetuating negative stereotypes than in anything else. We all really should be very wary of white vans - and I don't mean that white vans in and of themselves are a threat but that a white van was easily lodged in all our minds and white vans one after another distracted each and every one of us from seeing the real killer hiding in the shadows.
NEWS
October 30, 2002
RESPONDING to truancy with coercive efforts to enforce the attendance of chronically absent high school students is a misguided, wasteful and counterproductive effort. Students who routinely choose to avoid school do so out of a profound lack of interest and investment in the educational offerings provided to them. The only way to ensure that students will attend school regularly and benefit from the time they spend there is to offer a pedagogical product that is considered by disaffected young people to be enriching, gratifying and respectful.
NEWS
October 25, 2002 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In an effort to boost attendance and academic achievement, the Philadelphia School District plans to hire about 250 parents to help find truant students in their communities. The parents will be hired and trained by a dozen community and faith-based organizations, which the district plans to appoint early in November. The parents will earn $8 to $10 an hour and work 20 to 30 hours a week. The new force of truant officers will begin work Dec. 2. District chief executive Paul Vallas provided these details yesterday as he laid out his plan to crack down on truancy in the 200,000-student district.
NEWS
October 23, 2002
THIS MORNING, 15,000 chairs are empty in schools all across the city. Not from sickness or excused absences, but from kids cutting school. If you think that's not your problem, think again. After all, your taxes are helping to pay for those students to get educated. At current annual school district spending levels of $8,149 per student, every absence means a wasted $45 for that day. With 15,000 students cutting school on any given day, the total cost of truancy is a staggering $675,000 a day. Hooky-players cost us $13 million a month.
NEWS
October 16, 2002 | By Melanie Burney INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Special search teams hit the streets shortly after 10 a.m. yesterday in a sweep to find the city's most wanted: students absent from public schools. In the first day of a four-day crackdown, 20 students were picked up. They were hauled into truancy headquarters at Broadway Elementary School, processed, and then taken to their schools. Most were first-time offenders, so they received only a warning. Their parents were also notified. The roundup is the latest attempt by South Jersey's largest district to cut its staggering dropout and attendance rates.
NEWS
March 14, 2002 | By Melanie Burney INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The hundreds of students who skip school in Camden every day will be rounded up and their parents will be haled into court, district Superintendent Annette D. Knox said yesterday. "We intend to find our children, and we intend to bring them back to school," Knox pledged in launching an ambitious plan to cut the district's abysmal dropout and attendance rates. "We can't fail these kids; they've been failed for too long. " Effective immediately, Knox said, the district - South Jersey's largest - will begin enforcing existing attendance policies and making changes to curb truancy.
NEWS
June 25, 2001 | By NAOMI M. POST
REMEMBER THE apprehension you felt as a child when your teacher called you forward to receive your report card? For those trying to improve the well-being of Philadelphia's children, that feeling flooded back on June 13, as the city released its second annual children's report card and children's budget. First, the good news. We have seen consistent improvement in achievement scores, participation levels in standardized testing, rising graduation rates and the rate of first-time first-graders promoted.
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