FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
November 6, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Transportation Security Administration said Monday that the public should "not anticipate a change in airport security" after the shootings at Los Angeles International Airport last week. "However, passengers may see an increased presence of local law-enforcement officers" across the country, the agency said. "Security measures will be both seen and unseen. " Friday's slaying of Gerardo Hernandez, the first TSA employee killed in the line of duty, was not unlike mass shootings at a Colorado movie theater, a Connecticut elementary school, or the Sept.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2016 | By Joel Naroff
Isn't it amazing how TSA, a three-letter agency, can become a four-letter word? The organization charged with keeping us safe while we travel has become the gang that cannot screen straight. With security lines stretching forever, flights being missed, and baggage not making it on planes, anger is mounting. And the blame is being heaped on TSA management. But should the buck stop there? No! Though demand has risen, Congress has limited spending and staffing, airline policies have increased screening requirements, and together with the TSA they have created a service disaster.
NEWS
June 8, 2012 | By Michael Hinkelman and Daily News Staff Writer
A SUSPENDED training instructor with the Transportation Security Administration who worked at Philadelphia International Airport was sentenced late Wednesday in federal district court to four years' probation in connection with taking a $200 bribe from a TSA officer in 2011. Shannon Gilliam, 30, of Sharon Hill, was also ordered to serve the first six months of probation under house arrest with an ankle bracelet and perform 300 hours of community service. He pleaded guilty to a single count of bribery in February.
NEWS
August 31, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
NEXT MONTH, hundreds of thousands of pilgrims will flock like papal doves to Philly for the World Meeting of Families. Many will fly into and out of Philly International Airport. Some will have babies in tow, and those babies will get hungry on their flights back home. And they will want milk. Because they're, y'know, babies. My prayerful entreaty is that the Transportation Security Administration is more accommodating with them than it was with the Bunn's baby. Last Monday morning, Steve and Susana Bunn were headed home to Santa Ana, Calif., after a long visit here with friends and family (Steve is a Philly native)
BUSINESS
June 16, 2012 | By Linda Loyd and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Transportation Security Administration on Friday dismissed seven employees at Philadelphia International Airport for paying bribes to an instructor in exchange for passing annual proficiency exams. TSA management at the Philadelphia airport removed 10 employees from security duties in November pending results of an investigation of bribery by the Homeland Security Department's Office of Inspector General. Since then, three of the employees have resigned. The seven others were notified Friday of the TSA's intent to terminate their employment for professional misconduct.
NEWS
February 9, 2015
THE TRANSPORTATION Security Administration wouldn't comment for my column last week about Roger Vanderklok, who was arrested after he tried to file a complaint about a TSA supervisor at Philadelphia International Airport. After Vanderklok's story went viral, though, the TSA issued a statement on its website about Vanderklok's case. Included was a photo that TSA agents took of the capped PVC tube Vanderklok had in his carry-on bag. The photo was placed alongside a photo of an actual pipe bomb that had been made from PVC tubing, apparently to show the similarities between the items.
NEWS
February 16, 2012 | By Michael Hinkelman
Federal prosecutors unsealed bribery charges today against a Transportation Security Administration (TSA) instructor at Philadelphia International Airport. Shannon Gilliam, 29, of Sharon Hill, was charged by criminal information, a process which typically indicates a plea deal is in the works. The information said Gilliam was employed as a security training instructor with the TSA. He was responsible for training transportation security officers (TSOs) and to administer mandatory screening proficiency tests to TSOs who handle passenger and baggage screening at the airport.
NEWS
March 8, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
You still can't carry a bottle of water through security, and those three-ounce liquids and gels must be in a see-through, quart-size bag, so why allow pocket knives? The U.S. Transportation Security Administration says that beginning April 25, it will allow small knives, golf clubs, ski poles, toy baseball bats, and other previously forbidden items on flights in the United States. The announcement drew immediate criticism from flight attendants and pilots. The union representing 8,000 American Airlines pilots said the changes "represent a significant step backward in aviation security.
NEWS
February 29, 2012
A TRAINING instructor with the Transportation Security Administration at Philadelphia International Airport pleaded guilty yesterday to taking a bribe from a transportation security officer. Shannon Gilliam, 29, of Sharon Hill, potentially faces four to 27 months in prison under advisory sentencing guidelines. Gilliam has been suspended pending outcome of the investigation, a TSA official said. Prosecutors said Gilliam was responsible for training transportation security officers and administering mandatory certification exams to officers who handle passenger and baggage screening at the airport.
NEWS
May 26, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
With 38 million Americans expected to hit the roads, rails, and skies this Memorial Day weekend, the Transportation Security Administration is asking fliers to check their pockets, carry-on bags, and handbags before arriving at airport security checkpoints, where lines have been an hour or longer. No grenades - real or fake. No drills or saws, knives or blades. No toy guns or hammers, and leave the bullets and brass knuckles at home. TSA public affairs manager Michael McCarthy showcased for reporters Tuesday how a security lane at a Philadelphia International Airport checkpoint moved four times faster if people followed proper procedures.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 1, 2016 | By Ronnie Polaneczky
I've got my fingers crossed so tightly for Roger Vanderklok, I think I've busted some knuckles. That's how much I want his lawsuit against the Transportation Security Administration to go to trial already. I have no doubt a jury would hand Vanderklok some long-overdue justice. As a happy consequence, a ruling in Vanderklok's favor could change the way travelers experience airport-security screening. I'll get to that in a sec. But first, let me refresh your memory about Vanderklok's saga, which I detailed in a column last year . On Jan. 26, 2013, Vanderklok, now 60, a Philly architect and avid runner, went through the security screening area of Terminal B at Philly International Airport.
BUSINESS
August 11, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
The term "dog days of summer" has new meaning at Philadelphia International and other U.S. airports. A new federal rule, as of last Thursday, requires U.S. airports receiving federal financial aid to provide pet potties inside airport terminals, in areas past security. The law, titled Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Disability in Air Travel, mandates that airports with 10,000 or more annual passengers provide indoor wheelchair-accessible pet-relief areas convenient to airline gates for service animals that accompany passengers departing, connecting, or arriving on flights.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2016 | By Joel Naroff
Isn't it amazing how TSA, a three-letter agency, can become a four-letter word? The organization charged with keeping us safe while we travel has become the gang that cannot screen straight. With security lines stretching forever, flights being missed, and baggage not making it on planes, anger is mounting. And the blame is being heaped on TSA management. But should the buck stop there? No! Though demand has risen, Congress has limited spending and staffing, airline policies have increased screening requirements, and together with the TSA they have created a service disaster.
NEWS
May 26, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
With 38 million Americans expected to hit the roads, rails, and skies this Memorial Day weekend, the Transportation Security Administration is asking fliers to check their pockets, carry-on bags, and handbags before arriving at airport security checkpoints, where lines have been an hour or longer. No grenades - real or fake. No drills or saws, knives or blades. No toy guns or hammers, and leave the bullets and brass knuckles at home. TSA public affairs manager Michael McCarthy showcased for reporters Tuesday how a security lane at a Philadelphia International Airport checkpoint moved four times faster if people followed proper procedures.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
With airport security lines growing and the summer travel season looming, Congress has agreed to shift $34 million to hire 768 additional security officers and pay overtime to help alleviate long lines at airport security checkpoints. Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson and Transportation Security Administration Administrator Peter Neffenger said at a news conference Friday that the agency has developed a plan to boost the ranks of screeners, but that the traveling public should be prepared to wait and should arrive two hours before domestic flights.
NEWS
April 11, 2016 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Staff Writer
EGG HARBOR TOWNSHIP, N.J. - The calling card of Atlantic City International Airport long has been convenience. Compared with larger airports in the greater metropolitan area - including Philadelphia International and Newark Liberty International - passengers at ACY could expect easy travel to and from the airport, relatively inexpensive parking, and fairly quick security screenings. But cutbacks that began in March in Transportation Security Administration personnel at the facility have limited the hours that security checkpoints are manned - now until only 8 p.m. daily.
NEWS
March 31, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
The American Airlines copilot accused of being intoxicated before a scheduled flight to Philadelphia from Detroit on Saturday is from Chadds Ford, the Wayne County, Mich., Prosecutor's Office said Tuesday. John Francis Maguire, 50, has been charged with a misdemeanor crime of operating an aircraft under the influence. Maguire, who was released after being charged Saturday, will be arraigned next week, said Maria Miller, a spokeswoman for Wayne County Prosecutor Kym Worthy. At 6:28 a.m. Saturday, Transportation Security Administration screeners observed that Maguire, while going through crew security screening, "appeared to be under the influence of alcohol," said a report of the Wayne Metro Airport Police Department.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2015 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: My dad wants to have my son, 6, visit him out of state for a week over the summer. The impetus for this request is that my in-laws hosted him for a week last summer, so he feels he should have a turn. However, there are so many reasons my husband and I will not allow him to spend time with my dad unaccompanied by us. First, the main reason he wants to have my son visit is a "keeping up with the Joneses" thing with my in-laws.
NEWS
September 28, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Julia Terruso, Michael Boren, and Matthew Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writers
Center City transformed into a steel maze of security gates and fences Friday, guarded by scores of local and federal police authorities, who claimed the streets ahead of the imminent arrival of Pope Francis. Concrete barriers blocked major routes such as Market Street East and smaller streets across the area, and pedestrians found themselves stopped from walking to one place from the other. An alphabet soup of police and investigative agencies - FBI, HSI, TSA, CBP - joined dozens of Philadelphia police officers on and around the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, a main stage for this weekend's papal activities.
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