CollectionsTug Mcgraw
IN THE NEWS

Tug Mcgraw

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 18, 1991 | By Edward Colimore and Robert J. Terry, Inquirer Staff Writers
Mark McGraw, son of former Phillies relief pitcher Tug McGraw, was charged yesterday with raping a Temple University sophomore at her campus dormitory on Sunday, police said. McGraw, accompanied by his father and an attorney, turned himself over to police at the department's Sex Crimes Unit in the 1700 block of Pattison Avenue in South Philadelphia. He was charged with rape, indecent assault, indecent exposure, simple assault, false imprisonment and unlawful restraint, police said.
NEWS
June 2, 1989 | By Joe Logan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Silly you, you probably thought Tug McGraw, erstwhile Phillies star, was out of baseball. "Oh, no," McGraw, 45, said yesterday, "I still pitch semipro for Wilmington Truck Body. In fact, we won 13-0 last night, and the Tugger pitched four innings of shutout ball. " But the Tugger's real job these days is covering sports for Channel 6. Long gone are the days of those "You Gotta Believe" pieces, punctuated by the smiley faces. Now he reports on ex-teammates and friends, such as Mike Schmidt.
NEWS
September 21, 1987 | By Tanya Barrientos, Inquirer Staff Writer
He wasn't a statesman, a historian or a college professor, but he had been asked to come and talk to students at Henderson High School about the Constitution. He seemed a bit overwhelmed by the task, at times fumbling for ways to apply his life experiences to the tenets of the 200-year-old document. But former baseball star Tug McGraw's constitutional pitch turned out to be a big hit. McGraw's visit to the high school in West Chester was one of many ways that area students celebrated the bicentennial of the Constitution.
NEWS
January 9, 2004
I have a problem with the deification of Tug McGraw. I'm sure he was a nice, fan-friendly, fun guy, but I've never been able to look at him the same way after the details of his relationship with his son, Tim, came out. According to the Daily News, Tug never sought any contact with Tim or offered any support. And after meeting Tim at age 11, Tug went on to ignore multiple letters from his son. Tug claimed to be uncertain that Tim was his son, but that's a pitiful excuse.
NEWS
January 13, 2004 | By KEVIN KERRANE
THE MANY affectionate eulogies for Tug McGraw have rightly recalled his courage, on and off the field, and his fun-loving personality. But too few have done justice to Tug's intelligence and craft. Red Smith got it right 30 years ago. "Tug McGraw," Smith wrote, "is left-handed and lighthearted and not necessarily more predictable than the screwball he throws, but he is no dummy. " I didn't appreciate Tug's devotion to pitching as an art until he had been out of baseball for four years.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1997 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
No matter what museum curators and other experts might say, taste in art is a personal affair. We all respond to different kinds of images and techniques of art-making. So what would happen if ordinary citizens - that is, nonspecialists in art - were given the chance to create their own exhibition? The answer will emerge Sunday when the Museum of American Art of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts opens an unusual show called "Philadelphia's Choice. " It's a group of 48 paintings and two sculptures chosen from the museum's permanent collection by 17 area residents.
SPORTS
May 3, 1994 | by Mark Kram, Daily News Sports Writer
Backstage in his dressing room at the Saginaw Civic Center, Tim McGraw opened a bottle of beer and asked: "How far is South Bend from here?" Wearing a wide-brimmed, black cowboy hat and boots with toes sharp enough to be lethal weapons, McGraw had just wrapped up a concert date in front of a packed house and posed for pictures with a delegation of teenaged fans. One of the hottest new names out of Nashville - his "Not a Moment Too Soon" is the top-selling country album in America, highlighted by the controversial hit single "Indian Outlaw" - McGraw was scheduled to climb back on the bus and head to South Bend, Ind., for an appearance at Notre Dame.
SPORTS
March 29, 2003 | By Pete Schnatz FOR THE INQUIRER
Andy Belmont drew inspiration from Tug McGraw's chest-thumping antics as a relief pitcher for the 1980 world champion Phillies. Today, Belmont hopes to return the favor as McGraw recovers from surgery to remove a brain tumor. Belmont's No. 91 Pontiac will carry two special messages - "Get Well Tug McGraw" and "You Gotta Believe" - in this afternoon's Busch Series race at Texas Motor Speedway. "Having grown up near Philly, I had to do something," said Belmont, a Penndel native.
SPORTS
March 18, 2011 | by Paul Hagen
IT STARTED innocently, as many traditions do. Thirty years ago, baseball barely observed St. Patrick's Day during spring training. Dodgers owner Walter O'Malley, proud Irishman that he was, always made sure that corned beef and cabbage was the dinner entree at Dodgertown in Vero Beach. That was about it. And then Tug McGraw decided to have a little fun. It's a well-worn tale by now. How McGraw, who had proclaimed St. Patrick's Day his favorite holiday, conspired to have his entire uniform dyed green the night before.
SPORTS
December 4, 2005 | By Todd Zolecki INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tom Gordon must have been just 9 or 10 at the time, but he remembers the moment vividly. He and his father were watching the Atlanta Braves play the Phillies. It must have been late in the game and the Phillies must have been winning because Gordon's father turned to him and said, "Son, that's Tug McGraw pitching. " To which Gordon responded, "Dad, his name is Tug?" But Gordon, whose nickname is "Flash" and whom the Phillies introduced as their new closer yesterday at Citizens Bank Park, has an appreciation for McGraw.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
July 12, 2013 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
NINE DAYS after undergoing surgery, Darren Daulton has been diagnosed with glioblastoma, an aggressive form of brain cancer. Daulton underwent surgery to remove two tumors July 1. But, his battle isn't over. The update on Daulton's condition was released in a statement on 97.5 The Fanatic yesterday afternoon. "[Darren] has returned to his Clearwater [Fla.] area home to continue recuperating amongst his immediate family and friends," the statement read. "He will eventually begin treatments in Florida.
NEWS
April 29, 2013
Philadelphia's Top 50 Baseball Players By Rich Westcott University of Nebraska Press. 272 pp. $24.95 Reviewed by Larry Eichel   According to local baseball historian Rich Westcott, someone named Bob Johnson is one of the top 50 baseball players in Philadelphia history. Never heard of him? The man known as "Indian Bob" (he was one-quarter Cherokee) played for the Philadelphia Athletics from 1933 through 1942, spending most of his time in left field.
SPORTS
April 7, 2013 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Phillies home opener on Friday against the Kansas City Royals brought back memories of a landmark season in team history. After winning an epic five-game National League championship series against the Houston Astros, the Phillies beat the Royals in six games to win the franchise's first World Series in 1980. With that as a backdrop, Hall of Fame third basemen Mike Schmidt and the Royals' George Brett took part in the opening-game ceremonies and then spoke about a variety of topics, including 1980.
SPORTS
November 16, 2012 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Growing up in Jenkintown, Bradley Cooper lived and died with the Eagles. So he was quite at home in Silver Linings Playbook, which stars Cooper as the troubled Pat Solitano and Robert De Niro as his Eagles-obsessed father. During his youth, Cooper said, he and his own father, who has since died, were drawn together by the Eagles. "Anytime you can make a connection with your own life and your role, it's a great thing," Cooper, 37, said during an interview Wednesday at the Eagles' practice facility in South Philadelphia.
SPORTS
June 6, 2012 | BY DAN GERINGER
Christopher Laffey, 36, a country-music songwriter from Havertown, was driving down the shore during the summer of 2010, listening to the Phillies game on the car radio, when the phrase hit him: "Love Our Fightin' Phillies!" Then the tune hit him. And then he hit the beach, broke out his old-school notebook, and started humming and writing and going with the flow. "At first, I wanted to put Charlie Manuel in," he told SportsWeek in his native Irish brogue, "but then I thought, ‘No!
NEWS
May 28, 2012 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
WILDWOOD — There were certainly sunbathers basking on the beach and children riding the boardwalk rides. There were hamburgers and hot dogs and backyard barbecues aplenty. Saturday was, after all, the first day of a three-day weekend that marks the unofficial start to the summer vacation season. But in this Jersey Shore resort, there's something more to Memorial Day weekend this year than the usual sun and sand: the city's first-ever "Celebration of Heroes Beach Festival," an event organizers say is expected to bring more than 250,000 people.
NEWS
February 24, 2012 | By Jon Caroulis
I've been fortunate enough to live through the two best eras of Phillies baseball: the late 1970s and early '80s, when the franchise won its first World Series, and the current period, which has seen a second championship and may yet see a third. I've watched Hall of Fame players like Mike Schmidt and Steve Carlton; potential Hall of Famers like Chase Utley and Roy Halladay; folk heroes like John Kruk and Tug McGraw; and one-shot wonders like Marty Bystrom and Mike Rogodzinski (who led the league in pinch hits in 1973 and then disappeared)
SPORTS
October 12, 2011 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
As Jim Croce, that Phillies fan from Upper Darby, cautioned long ago, you don't spit into the wind. Why seed black clouds that, even on the sunniest Philadelphia sports day, are hovering not far away? Why prod cruel fate when, after creating decades of devastation, it's sleeping at last? Why mess around with baseball karma? I'm still trying to figure out why, on the 34th anniversary of Black Friday, with the skittish 2011 Phillies desperate for a season-saving Game 5 victory, club officials decided to commemorate the lowest moment from one of the franchise's lowest points.
SPORTS
October 7, 2011
Nervous? Anxious? Trouble sleeping Thursday night? That's what these elimination games can do to a person. Do or die. Win or go home. It all sounds so scary, and no doubt a large portion of frantic Phillies fans are out there are already gnawing at their nails in anticipation of Friday night's Game 5 at Citizens Bank Park. Some free advice: Embrace this moment and enjoy the ride. Roy Halladay is pitching and the Phillies are at home. That combination makes them the favorite to win and advance.
SPORTS
October 7, 2011
AFTER A TOUGH loss, venerable knuckleballer Charlie Hough could be found in front of his locker, alternately dragging on a cigarette and a beer, dispensing perspective with a casual been-there, done-that air. Such as: "Every baseball game is important, but no one game is that important. " With all due respect to Hough's sagacity, the game your Philadelphia Phillies will play tonight at Citizens Bank Park against the St. Louis Cardinals to decide which team advances in the postseason tournament is that important.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|