CollectionsTuition
IN THE NEWS

Tuition

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 10, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Caitlyn Ricci and her parents sat on opposite sides of the Camden courtroom, emblematic of a deep family divide. On the right was Ricci, 21, wearing a solid green shirt and black dress pants, with her attorney. On the left side, seated together, were her divorced parents: middle school English teacher Maura McGarvey and varsity high school basketball coach Michael Ricci, joined by each of their attorneys. Superior Court Judge Thomas Shusted Jr. implored both sides - who have fought more than a year over who should pay Caitlyn Ricci's college tuition - to stop bickering.
NEWS
July 15, 2011 | By Miriam Hill
INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Penn State University will raise tuition 4.9 percent for in-state students and 2.9 percent for out-of-state students for the upcoming school year, Penn State President Graham Spanier announced at the Board of Trustees meeting Friday. Last year, the University increased tuition 5.9 and 4.5 percent respectively for in-state and out-of-state students. The meeting is taking place at Penn State Lehigh Valley Campus, according to the Daily Collegian, which is covering the event.
NEWS
April 29, 1992 | BY DAVIDSON GOLDIN, From the New York Times
As the government spends increasingly less on student financial aid, many leading colleges and universities are using a greater percentage of tuition revenues for scholarships. Just as tax breaks are given for charitable contributions, this portion of tuition should be tax deductible. Statistics compiled by the Consortium on Financing Higher Education, which does research and analysis for 32 member colleges, show the growing importance of tuition income for supporting scholarships.
NEWS
June 27, 1991 | by Edward Moran, Daily News Staff Writer
Temple University's continued financial problems may force the school to increase tuition by $402 this year, university sources said yesterday. The university's 36-member board of trustees is expected to approve the proposed 9.5 percent increase this afternoon, after it votes to adopt the school's $708 million operating budget, the sources said. Tuition has already been raised by 7 percent for the second summer semester, which begins July 8, according to the sources. The increase will raise next year's tuition from $4,234 to $4,636.
NEWS
April 26, 1987 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Beginning next fall, Temple University will allow students to pay tuition and dormitory charges in 10 monthly installments each year, with no interest or finance charges other than an annual $40 fee to cover administrative costs. Temple President Peter J. Liacouras said the new program - the Temple University Installment Payment Plan, or TIPP - would provide the school's 31,100 full- and part-time students with "a convenience in budgeting cash flow," rather than direct financial aid. "TIPP is an option that our working students and their parents can use to help pay for an education at Temple," Liacouras said.
NEWS
March 21, 1991 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Students at Montgomery County Community College will pay an additional $7 per credit hour starting with the college's first summer session in May. The school's board of trustees voted Monday, 11-1, to raise tuition from $50 to $57 per credit hour. Trustee Jean Stefanowicz voted against the proposal. Board members Muriel B. Pancoast, Peter J. Korsan and Delores Rotello were absent. It is the first time the college has raised tuition since 1988, when tuition was increased from $45 to $50 per credit hour.
NEWS
April 3, 2008 | By MICHAEL DANNENBERG & BENJAMIN MILLER
IT'S NOT NEWS that the cost of a college degree has risen significantly over the last couple of decades. Since 1990, tuition and fees have risen by nearly 225 percent at four-year public colleges and by 154 percent at private four-year colleges. The real story is that tuition growth rates often fluctuate wildly from year to year - which makes it hard for families to plan ahead and budget enough to cover the costs. Last year, students at Villanova faced an unexpected tuition and fee increase that was double the previous year's.
NEWS
January 27, 1991 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, Special to The Inquirer
During the war in the Persian Gulf, Goddard Early Learning Centers have cut tuition in half for any family whose mother or father is serving in the gulf. President Joseph A. Scandone said the tuition reduction was to help alleviate additional stress for families. For Sue Donnelly, who is living in Berwyn, the reduced tuition helped make it possible for her 3-year-old son, Jamie, to attend the Malvern school. Donnelly's husband, Pat, was sent to Saudia Arabia on Aug. 29. Donnelly said that she and her family had been living at Hunter Airfield in Stewart, Ga., but that after her husband was activated, she and Jamie returned to the area to live with her father.
NEWS
February 20, 1992 | By David T. Shaw, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Peter Ciotoli is glad to be moving his family back into the area, but he didn't exactly get the welcome he had hoped for from the Downingtown school board. Five years ago, Ciotoli's job with a local environmental consulting firm transferred him to Virginia. Now, that job has transferred him back. As the Ciotoli family awaited completion of a house being built in West Bradford, the only home Ciotoli could find to lease in the interim was in Exton, which lies within the West Chester Area School District.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 19, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the first time in nearly 50 years, in-state students attending Pennsylvania State University will face no tuition increase for the next academic year. Reversing a proposal announced Thursday that would have raised tuition 2.7 percent, or $450, for in-state students attending the main campus, the university's board of trustees on Friday unanimously approved the tuition freeze. The break will require the board to cut as much as $17 million from the annual budget. The tuition break applies to Pennsylvania residents attending all of the university's 19 undergraduate campuses.
NEWS
July 18, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tuition for incoming freshmen and sophomores at Pennsylvania State University's main campus would rise 2.7 percent, or $450, for 2015-16 under a proposal passed by the board of trustees' finance committee Thursday. In-state students would pay $17,022, up from $16,572 last year, the university said. Out-of-state students also would pay more. In March, the trustees approved a 3.89 percent increase in room-and-board costs. If the tuition proposal is adopted this week, the total per-student cost, including fees, would exceed $28,100 for next year.
NEWS
July 17, 2015 | By Chris Brennan and Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writers
A private Catholic elementary school beset by controversy after firing a popular faculty member for being in a same-sex marriage is calling in help to deal with outraged parents. Nell Stetser, principal of Waldron Mercy Academy in Merion, wrote to parents and faculty Wednesday, acknowledging that the school's community "has been shaken" by the firing of Margie Winters, the school's director of religious education since 2007. "I understand that there are feelings of frustration, disappointment, betrayal, anger, and sorrow," wrote Stetser, who fired Winters on June 22 after she refused to resign.
NEWS
July 16, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University's board of trustees on Tuesday approved a 2.8 percent increase in tuition for the coming year, meaning in-state students will pay $14,398 in 2015-16, up by $392 from the last academic year. Fees for all full-time students will rise by $100, to $790, to accommodate increased costs in activities and technology, said Ken Kaiser, Temple's chief financial officer and treasurer. Students will pay $15,188 in 2015-16 for tuition and fees, up $492 (3.3 percent) from the last academic year.
NEWS
July 11, 2015 | By Erin Edinger-Turoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
Students at 14 state-owned universities will pay $240 more in tuition for the coming academic year under a plan approved Thursday by the board of governors of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education. Full-time in-state students will pay $7,060 in 2015-16, up from $6,820. The increase comes despite Gov. Wolf's call in March for state-owned universities to freeze tuition, when he proposed a $45.3 million (11 percent) bump in funding for 2015-16. "We took what we feel was an appropriate action at this point," board spokesman Kenn Marshall said, adding that universities need to start fall planning.
NEWS
July 9, 2015 | By Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writer
The college transition brings with it the stress of packing, making friends, and getting adjusted to a new learning environment. For international students, coming to a new country also involves an additional anxiety: fitting in. For the first time, the Haddonfield School District is working to ease that transition for some high-achieving students from China, Superintendent Richard Perry said. In September, Haddonfield Memorial High School plans to enroll four students - one junior and three seniors - from southern China's Guangdong Country Garden School for stays of 10 to 12 months.
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON - New Jersey's colleges should reconsider the traditional "high aid, high tuition" funding model long in place, a task force on college affordability was told Wednesday. Steven M. Rose, president of Passaic County Community College, said he believed the funding model had grown unconsciously over time: When the state cut or limited funding, public colleges and universities would raise tuition, and the state money would go toward financial aid instead. Students from wealthy families can pay full price, Rose said, and students from low-income families can receive financial aid. But the students in the middle can get caught in the gap between being able to afford college and qualifying for need-based financial aid, said Rose, who also is chairman of the New Jersey Presidents' Council, an organization of the state's college and university presidents.
NEWS
April 29, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's 14 state universities raised tuition 27 percent over six years, and a state audit report released Monday says that while stagnant state aid is largely to blame, the system should do better. "Despite laudable efforts to hold down costs, the state system must look for additional ways to minimize tuition hikes, cut costs, and increase enrollment," said Auditor General Eugene D. DePasquale. The 59-page report, which was largely positive, noted that while the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education offers one of the most affordable options, "many students and families across the commonwealth are concerned that attaining a PASSHE education is becoming out of reach.
NEWS
April 10, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Several hundred undocumented immigrants are benefiting from a law enacted in late 2013 letting them pay in-state tuition at New Jersey colleges and universities, according to a new report. Last year, 251 new undergraduate students took advantage of the law, along with 113 continuing students, according to the report by New Jersey Policy Perspective (NJPP), a liberal-leaning think tank. Colleges provided the figures, which are tracked because the law requires students to submit affidavits that say they will agree to pursue legal status if federal law changes.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2015
DREXEL University junior Zakiya James didn't graduate from high school, or even spend much time there. She never took the SATs or got a GED. None of that stopped the 17-year-old from becoming a Drexel Dragon in January. Since transferring to the school, she has been thriving, taking a host of heavy-duty engineering courses. But there's one small problem: Zakiya's parents can't afford Drexel's pricey tuition. Not by a long shot. Her mother, who works as a medical receptionist in Washington, D.C., was able to make Zakiya's housing deposit and gave her money for books, but that was pretty much it. Zakiya has gotten financial aid from the school, but she is faced with the onerous task of coming up with the rest of the money she needs for tuition on her own. It's heartbreaking.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|