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Tuition Assistance

NEWS
January 25, 1994 | Daily News Staff Report
Catholic high school students will face a $175 tuition increase next year, the smallest in six years, bringing the total school bill to $2,600, according to an archdiocesan spokeswoman. Non-Catholic students attending archdiocesan high schools will pay $200 more, or $3,200 per year, according to spokeswoman Marie Kelly. In a Jan. 18 letter to parents, Msgr. Philip J. Cribben, secretary for Catholic education in the archdiocese, said the 7.2 percent increase was the result of improved enrollment projections and new funding sources.
NEWS
June 30, 2004 | By Melanie Burney INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gov. McGreevey yesterday offered thousands of students another reason to attend a New Jersey community college: free tuition. As many as 16,000 spring graduates who finished in the top 20 percent of their class are eligible for free tuition this fall at one of 19 New Jersey community colleges. It is believed to be the first time that a state has offered such a program for its community colleges, said Lawrence Nespoli, president of the New Jersey Council of County Colleges.
NEWS
January 22, 2004 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It will cost $3,900 - an increase of $200 - to send a student to one of the 21 high schools the Archdiocese of Philadelphia operates in the five counties of Southeastern Pennsylvania in the fall. "Even with this increase in tuition for the next school year, the Catholic high schools administered by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia will continue to charge one of the lowest tuitions that can be found in a privately funded high school operating anywhere in the United States," Richard McCarron, secretary for Catholic education, said in a letter mailed to parents Friday.
NEWS
January 20, 2005 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tuition for the 22,000 students who attend high schools operated by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia will top $4,000 for the first time in September, officials said yesterday. The archdiocese announced that the basic tuition at its 21 high schools in the five-county region will be $4,140 for the 2005-06 academic year. The $240 increase amounts to 6 percent more than this year's tuition of $3,900. The new rate follows a 5.4 percent increase this school year. Richard McCarron, secretary for Catholic Education, informed parents of the new rate in a letter sent last Friday.
NEWS
July 31, 2004 | By Terry Bitman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tuition at New Jersey's 19 community colleges will rise an average of 4.4 percent this fall, the New Jersey Council of County Colleges said yesterday. The council called the increase modest and said it amounted to an increase of about $3.12 a credit hour. For full-time students, the average increase comes to about $94 a year. Tuition will rise $4 to $70 a credit hour for in-county students at Camden County College; $3 to $71 a credit hour at Gloucester County College, and $1 to $66 a credit hour at Burlington County College.
NEWS
April 9, 1990 | By Kathy Brennan, Daily News Staff Writer
The union representing employees of area Super Fresh supermarkets ratified a contract agreement last night after more than six months of negotiations with the company, a union spokesman said. Members of United Food and Commercial Workers Union Local 1776 voted 391-30 to ratify a three-year pact that includes pension increases of 33.3 percent for full-time workers and 40 percent for part-timers, local spokesman John Lavin said. The new contract also provides hourly pay raises of 50, 60 and 70 cents over the life of the contract, Lavin said.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the Archdiocese of Philadelphia set out in late 2008 to raise $200 million in donations, Catholics stepped up generously and pledged $221 million through January 2011. The Heritage of Faith/Vision of Hope campaign gathered $185 million in pledges for the archdiocese and $36 million specifically for parishes, the archdiocese reported. But pledging is one thing. Paying is another. Church officials said in late November, in a long-delayed report, that as of June 30, 2011 - just six months after the pledge period officially ended - collections were falling short.
NEWS
January 25, 2010 | By KITTY CAPARELLA, caparek@phillynews.com 215-854-5880
Tuition reimbursement was reinstated for the children of 1,500 unionized nurses and health-care professionals at the Temple University Health System by the Pennsylvania Labor Relations Board last week. About 150 members, whose dependents had been using the benefit, should be reimbursed about $1 million, said Bill Cruice, chief negotiator for the Pennsylvania Association of Staff Nurses and Allied Professionals. Michael Horvitz, 59, an emergency-room nurse for 20 years, said that he had used the benefit to enhance his nursing education and that now his learning-disabled son planned to use it for his education.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2010 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shouting slogans and hoisting placards, hundreds of Temple University Hospital nurses and technical employees walked a picket line Thursday amid a standoff over management demands for benefit cuts and other union concessions. Some 1,500 nurses and technical staff walked off their jobs on Wednesday, incensed that the hospital had eliminated a popular tuition assistance program and had failed to add nurses in what they described as understaffed units, among other grievances. "It's a matter of respect," said nurse Lisa Antenucci.
NEWS
March 15, 2007 | By Larry Eichel INQUIRER SENIOR WRITER
Democratic mayoral candidate Michael A. Nutter yesterday proposed creating a $10 million-a-year tax-credit program to encourage Philadelphia businesses to hire up to 1,000 ex-offenders. In announcing the plan, Nutter noted that released prisoners commit a high percentage of the city's crimes - while research indicates that the most effective way to keep them out of trouble is to get them jobs. But many employers refuse to hire anyone with a criminal record. Nutter's plan is designed to try to change that.
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