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Tuition

NEWS
July 3, 1991 | By Tia Swanson, Special to The Inquirer
Glassboro State College trustees last night voted to increase tuition by $6 per credit hour, despite receiving $2.2 million more than expected from the state. The college will use the additional money to restore about 15 faculty positions, give $200,000 more to the Camden campus and provide an additional $200,000 for remedial programs under a revised 1991-92 budget. The budget also adds $500,000 to the operating portion of the spending plan and provides funding for part-time positions in the library and health center.
NEWS
November 1, 1991 | BY S. FREDERICK STARR, From the New York Times
Higher education, private and public, is too expensive. The costs are prohibitively high, having risen 4.4 percent faster than inflation over a decade. Last year a public outcry forced universities to slash budgets and lay off staff members. Far from cutting tuition bills, however, these steps have only slowed the rate of increase of costs, but not much. At most schools this year's tuition increases are still well above the rate of inflation. Next year's increases are unlikely to be smaller, because further budget reductions would threaten basic functions.
NEWS
July 1, 2011 | Associated Press
HARRISBURG - A 7.5 percent tuition increase approved Thursday by the board that governs Pennsylvania's 14 state-owned universities will cost full-time resident students an additional $436 for the 2011-12 academic year, largely because of state aid cuts. The increases for resident students will push annual tuition from $5,804 to $6,240. The State System of Higher Education board also increased the technology fee that all students pay by $116 a year, to $348. Of the 120,000 students enrolled at system campuses, nearly 106,000 are Pennsylvania residents.
NEWS
January 17, 1986 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tuition for high schools operated by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia will go up $90 in September for families with one child in an archdiocesan high school and $180 for families with two or more children in school, the archdiocese announced yesterday. A family with one child in high school will pay tuition of $1,165 for the coming school year, and a family with two or more children will pay a flat fee of $2,330, according to the announcement. The amount that each parish in the archdiocese must pay for each of its parishioners enrolled in an archdiocesan high school will remain $240, the announcement said.
NEWS
September 8, 1989 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
A state Treasury Department employee who is the son of a former prominent Democratic state official has apparently become the first person to receive permission to have his law school tuition paid in part by taxpayers. James M. White, the department's general counsel, said yesterday that Charles Brown, who earns more than $30,000 a year as an executive assistant, would be eligible for tuition reimbursement. He said Brown would be eligible for $1,000 per semester if he successfully completed his courses at Widener University's new Harrisburg campus.
NEWS
July 26, 1987 | By Tanya Barrientos, Inquirer Staff Writer
To some students at West Chester University, a $150 tuition increase in the fall will be hard to swallow, and to make matters worse, university officials predict that the school still will have to cut back on supplies and in other areas to make ends meet. Earlier this month, the board of governors of the State System of Higher Education voted to increase tuition at 14 state universities by $150, boosting basic tuition for full-time, in-state graduate and undergraduate students to $1,830 from $1,680 a year.
NEWS
January 19, 1988 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tuition for Catholic high school students in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia will be $1,255 in the fall, $60 more than this year. Msgr. David E. Walls, vicar for Catholic education in the archdiocese, and Robert H. Palestini, superintendent of schools, announced the tuition increase in the Jan. 14 issue of the Catholic Standard and Times, the archdiocesan newspaper. About 33,500 students attend archdiocesan high schools in the five-county archdiocese. Families with two or more students enrolled in Catholic high schools will pay $2,510, an increase of $120.
NEWS
November 26, 1987 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
In one of the few publications of its kind available to area students and parents, the Philadelphia Gas Works has recently published a guide to costs at 119 public and private colleges and universities in Pennsylvania. The guide, titled "1987-88 Family Guide to College Costs in Pennsylvania," lists tuition, room and board during the current academic year at each of the schools, as well as contacts and telephone numbers for information about admissions and financial aid. "The process of selecting the best school for the student can seem intimidating and a college education today is an ample investment, costing up to $50,000 or more," the guide says.
NEWS
January 23, 2006
RE RONNIE POLANECZKY'S Jan. 19 column: Drew Weston-Ball, a senior at Bodine High in Philadelphia, is trying to sell advertising space on his hand to help pay for college. Many innovative kids like Drew will have to go severely into debt to banks to get higher education. Many will also give up the dream of going to college because this country is pricing most out of it. This is what we are doing to our youth, our posterity! This is a bipartisan issue. No one in Congress is taking this seriously enough.
NEWS
July 13, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
SCHUYLKILL HAVEN, Pa. - Even as Pennsylvania State University's board of trustees voted Friday to raise tuition by nearly 3 percent on its main campus, new president Eric Barron announced plans to focus on reining in soaring student debt. Over the last 10 years, Penn State graduates' debt has grown from an average of less than $20,000 to $35,000, Barron told the board during its meeting at the Penn State Schuylkill campus here. About two-thirds of students graduate with debt, the same percentage as a decade ago. It was Barron's first presentation as president to the board, during a meeting where the Jerry Sandusky child-rape scandal was again raised, this time by a trustee also attending his first meeting.
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