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Tuition

NEWS
December 24, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
The case of a Temple University student who sued her parents for tuition - after more than a year of courtroom drama that featured shouting matches between lawyers and a tearful plea from the mother - is headed for a new venue. The Appellate Division of New Jersey's Superior Court will take up Caitlyn Ricci's case, which until Monday had been heard by two Camden County judges. "This is a very difficult case," Judge Donald Stein said before sending the case to the appeals court. "I've really never seen a family torn apart the way this family is torn apart, and it's a tragedy.
NEWS
September 2, 2013
For Thomas Hundley and his middle-class family, a college education has become an elusive luxury. Hundley, 22, of Cherry Hill, could be a poster child for President Obama's latest effort to curb soaring tuition costs that put a college degree out of reach for many. A political science major at Howard University in Washington, Hundley missed his senior year last year after a desperately needed $25,000 student loan was denied. "I never thought I would have to stop going to school," Hundley said in an interview.
NEWS
July 18, 2014
TEMPLE University announced yesterday that tuition for undergraduate students will increase by 3.7 percent starting this fall. The university's board of trustees approved the increase, which will cost students an additional $600 this coming year. Tuition will be $14,006 for in-state residents and $24,032 for out-of-state students. Mandatory fees will remain at $690. Last year, Temple had more than 28,000 undergraduate students. The board attributed the increase in tuition to enhancements in student services and contractual salary increases.
NEWS
December 10, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Caitlyn Ricci and her parents sat on opposite sides of the Camden courtroom, emblematic of a deep family divide. On the right was Ricci, 21, wearing a solid green shirt and black dress pants, with her attorney. On the left side, seated together, were her divorced parents: middle school English teacher Maura McGarvey and varsity high school basketball coach Michael Ricci, joined by each of their attorneys. Superior Court Judge Thomas Shusted Jr. implored both sides - who have fought more than a year over who should pay Caitlyn Ricci's college tuition - to stop bickering.
NEWS
June 22, 2000 | By Gary H. Sternberg, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Camden County Technical School District yesterday approved a tuition increase of $2 per credit hour for its adult school for 2000-01. Since most full-time courses at the district's postsecondary technical institute are about 12 credit hours, that is an increase of $24 per course, said Gary Bennett, the district's assistant superintendent for business. Tuition will be $37 per credit hour for Camden County residents and $43 for everyone else. Tuition for postsecondary courses began in 1997 due to a reduction in state funding.
NEWS
July 17, 2009 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Temple University announced yesterday that it will stay with the 2.9 percent tuition increase trustees approved in April. But the university said it might have to reexamine its tuition if the state adopts a budget that contains a proposed $21 million cut in funding for Temple. Temple's tuition increase is smaller than the hikes of between 3.7 and 4.5 percent announced yesterday by Pennsylvania State University, the University of Pittsburgh, and the 14 state-system universities, including West Chester and Cheyney.
NEWS
September 11, 1988 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
The state auditor general has announced that the Lower Moreland School District should calculate tuition for Bryn Athyn students according to state Department of Education guidelines, not a longstanding oral agreement between the two districts. Auditor General Don Bailey recommended that the district abandon an oral agreement, in place since 1976, with Bryn Athyn on how the tuition was calculated. The difference in the two methods of calculation resulted in an overpayment by Bryn Athyn to Lower Moreland of $10,362 over the 1984-85 and 1985-86 school years, Bailey said a statement issued Aug. 15. Bailey's audit report also said Bryn Athyn would have to pay the tuition monthly rather than semi-annually.
NEWS
June 29, 2012 | By Susan Snyder and Dara McBride, Inquirer Staff Writers
Temple University's board of trustees voted Thursday morning to hold the line on tuition for 2012-13, its decision coming just days after state lawmakers proposed restoring a 30 percent budget cut to Temple and two other state-related colleges. It's the first time since 1995 that the university has not raised tuition, said spokesman Ray Betzner. The zero increase in tuition covers both in-state and out-of-state students. For in-state students, tuition will remain $13,006 and for out-of-state students, $22,832.
NEWS
June 19, 1997 | By Noel Holton, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Students at Rowan University likely will be paying several hundred dollars more to attend classes this fall. According to Rowan University president Herman James, a 14 percent increase in tuition, which was approved unanimously at a board of trustees meeting last night, is mostly due to a five-year general improvement plan at the institution. The rest is the result of state funding cuts. At the time the Rowan board was meeting, Whitman administration officials were announcing that an agreement had been reach to provide more money for higher education in the proposed budget.
NEWS
February 27, 1986 | By Kenneth Glick, Special to The Inquirer
Edgewater Park School officials are upset at the high cost of educating township students at Burlington City High School, but not upset enough to demand an independent audit of the Burlington board's budget. "We don't feel that an audit is necessary at this point," said Walter J. Dold, superintendent of Edgewater Park schools. The concern of the Edgewater Park officials and residents stems from a $700 tuition increase for the township students who attend Burlington High. During the school board meeting Monday, residents and officials asked Dold if an outside audit of Burlington City's books could be conducted.
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