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January 16, 2015 | DAILY NEWS STAFF REPORT
CONWELL-EGAN High is giving eighth-graders a chance to attend the school next year for half the usual tuition. The catch? Contestants have to make a halfcourt shot at tomorrow's Archbishop Wood at Conwell-Egan game, which begins at 7 p.m. The contest is open to eighth-grade boys and girls. All participants must preregister by calling the school at 215-945-6200 or visiting conwell-egan.org. Contestants will be offered free admission to the game and must check in before the end of the first quarter.
NEWS
January 16, 2015
WILL BUNCH informs us ("Free to be - and not be - Charlie"), that he and his colleagues at the Daily News disapprove of the crude humor in Charlie Hebdo , and so will not print the cartoons that led to mass murder in Paris. A month ago, there was perhaps a place for Mr. Bunch's nuanced editorial judgments about what is, and what is not, proper. Now, however, the cartoons are at the heart of the biggest news story in the world and you are a newspaper. How can you not publish them?
NEWS
January 13, 2015
THERE'S LITTLE not to like in President Obama's idea to provide free tuition for community-college students, which he announced last week. The idea, which would require Congressional approval, would provide a free two-year tuition ride for students meeting certain criteria, including keeping a 2.5 grade-point average. Obama touted it as a plan that would help students finance the first half of a bachelor's degree. He intends to address the proposal further in his State of the Union address next week.
NEWS
January 13, 2015
LESS THAN TWO WEEKS after Christmas, Santa Claus is back - this time wearing a Barack Obama mask, pulling the gift of "free tuition" out of his sack. The idea came out of leftfield, following his bold moves on illegal immigration, climate control with China and opening a door to Cuba. Santa Claus has gifts only for good children, and Santa Obama has a few strings on his proposal, called America's College Promise. Before we analyze the content, let's agree on two things: First, the tuition is "free" to students, but the bill will be paid by the government, meaning you. Second, since the money goes to the colleges, it motivates them to enroll as many students as possible and to keep them eligible as long as possible.
NEWS
January 11, 2015 | By Rita Giordano and Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writers
Proclaiming that "the United States is coming back," President Obama unveiled an ambitious proposal Friday that would allow millions of students to get a community college education tuition-free. The president's speech, while welcomed by several local community college leaders and students as well as some national education advocates, provided few details about how the program would work, including how it would be funded. Obama said he would submit the idea to Congress in coming weeks as part of his new budget.
NEWS
December 24, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
The case of a Temple University student who sued her parents for tuition - after more than a year of courtroom drama that featured shouting matches between lawyers and a tearful plea from the mother - is headed for a new venue. The Appellate Division of New Jersey's Superior Court will take up Caitlyn Ricci's case, which until Monday had been heard by two Camden County judges. "This is a very difficult case," Judge Donald Stein said before sending the case to the appeals court. "I've really never seen a family torn apart the way this family is torn apart, and it's a tragedy.
NEWS
December 10, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Caitlyn Ricci and her parents sat on opposite sides of the Camden courtroom, emblematic of a deep family divide. On the right was Ricci, 21, wearing a solid green shirt and black dress pants, with her attorney. On the left side, seated together, were her divorced parents: middle school English teacher Maura McGarvey and varsity high school basketball coach Michael Ricci, joined by each of their attorneys. Superior Court Judge Thomas Shusted Jr. implored both sides - who have fought more than a year over who should pay Caitlyn Ricci's college tuition - to stop bickering.
NEWS
November 14, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before Caitlyn Ricci sued her parents for college tuition money, before they stopped talking, before her father accused his parents - Caitlyn's grandparents - of "tearing my family apart," the Ricci family was just trying to hold things together. Caitlyn Ricci's parents divorced in 1997, four years after her birth. Her mother has said she worked to create a caring environment - taking her to aquariums and art museums - when Caitlyn wasn't with her father. But as Caitlyn pushed age 18 and beyond, her parents said, their relationship with her grew fragile.
NEWS
September 15, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lincoln University's promise got Aitza Hedgemond's attention: The incoming freshman's annual tuition would remain at $11,836 all four years, guaranteed. It was one factor that led Hedgemond to select Lincoln, a historically black university in rural Chester County, over several other schools. "I don't have to worry about tuition going up," said Hedgemond, 18, of Burlington, who received some scholarship money but is paying for the rest herself. "I don't have to take out extra loans.
NEWS
September 1, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jonathan Jusino spent his first year out of high school as a stock clerk and sales associate at a clothing store, and found it unfulfilling. "I noticed there was no future for me in the work I was doing," he said. So Jusino enrolled at Community College of Philadelphia last fall as a first step in pursuing a teaching career. With his financial aid, it would have taken him three years to get his associate's degree. But a program introduced by the college this semester will allow him to finish in 21/2.
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