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NEWS
November 20, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - The New Jersey Senate approved a bill Monday that would let undocumented immigrants qualify for in-state college tuition and state financial aid. Three Republicans joined 22 Democrats in supporting the bill, following brief debate spurred by one Republican over whether it would limit the opportunities of other New Jersey students. Twelve senators opposed the measure, which now must be heard by the Assembly. "We are opening up avenues for the next generation of leaders in this state and this country," said Sen. Teresa Ruiz (D., Essex)
NEWS
November 18, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON Giancarlo Tello, 23, didn't know he was in the United States illegally until he was a sophomore in high school and his mother told him he couldn't get a driver's license. Other realizations followed: Tello, whose parents brought him to New Jersey from Peru when he was 6, learned he didn't have a Social Security number. He couldn't work, except at odd jobs. And he couldn't receive financial aid to go to college or qualify for in-state tuition. While he earned enough as a tennis coach and computer instructor to attend Bergen Community College - hitching rides from his father, who woke him at 5 a.m. and picked him up from the school at 11 p.m. - Tello couldn't afford to continue a political science major he had begun at Rutgers University, he said Thursday.
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON To tamp down college costs, New Jersey's Senate president is proposing a study of new options for students, including a program that would defer tuition at state schools. Under the so-called Pay It Forward program, students would pay a percentage of their income for a certain number of years after graduating instead of tuition up front. The concept, also proposed in Oregon and Pennsylvania, has drawn some criticism from teachers' unions and questions about its feasibility.
NEWS
November 4, 2013 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
GREETINGS, college-bound high-school seniors! Over the next few weeks, you'll wrap up your college applications. The process will be more aggravating than it was for prior seniors because the Common Application - an online marvel that lets you apply to multiple schools using one document - has gone bat-crap this year, first locking applicants out of the website then kicking them off just before they hit "send. " Of the 517 colleges and universities that use the Common App, at least 175 have no alternative form of application.
NEWS
September 2, 2013
For Thomas Hundley and his middle-class family, a college education has become an elusive luxury. Hundley, 22, of Cherry Hill, could be a poster child for President Obama's latest effort to curb soaring tuition costs that put a college degree out of reach for many. A political science major at Howard University in Washington, Hundley missed his senior year last year after a desperately needed $25,000 student loan was denied. "I never thought I would have to stop going to school," Hundley said in an interview.
NEWS
August 27, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tony Hall tells his five daughters they must go on to college and get their degrees, but he doesn't have one himself. "It's kind of like a hypocrite. I say a degree is important, but they don't see mine hanging there," said the 35-year-old insurance agent from Wyncote. In July, Hall set out to change that by enrolling at Strayer University, a for-profit institution that offers a primarily business curriculum and caters to working adults. His decision was largely influenced by a new offer at Strayer: tuition breaks.
BUSINESS
August 26, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
President Obama complained last week about the rising cost of a college education and student debt. Isn't that kind of like the chief pirate complaining merchant ships are getting scarce? The price of anything that's privately built but heavily U.S. taxpayer-funded - weapons, medicine, colleges - tends to rise faster than stuff that trades more or less competitively, like tomatoes or scrap metal. Obama's response: By 2015, he wants U.S. taxpayers to subsidize schools, based not just on how much they charge, or whom they let in (the poorer the better)
NEWS
July 27, 2013
Learning on the installment plan Oregon state officials have taken a bold step toward solving the tuition problem for students trying to attend public universities. With the state's new "Pay it Forward, Pay it Back" plan, approved this month, needy students will pay nothing while in school, and then only 3 percent of their income for the next two decades after getting a four-year degree. Those who attend for a shorter time would pay a prorated amount. Although this plan is in use in other countries, it has never been tried here.
NEWS
July 20, 2013
By Katrina vanden Heuvel On July 1, federal student loan rates doubled from 3.4 percent to 6.8. Meanwhile, Oregon is paving the way for students to attend public universities without paying tuition or taking out traditional loans at all. A new bill, which Gov. John Kitzhaber is expected to sign, instructs Oregon's Higher Education Coordination Commission to come up with a "Pay It Forward, Pay It Back" university financing model in time for a...
NEWS
July 13, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. - The Rutgers University board of governors decided Thursday to increase tuition and fees 3.3 percent for full-time in-state students next school year, over the shouted objections of about two dozen protesters. Tuition, which is the same at the university's campuses in New Brunswick, Camden, and Newark, will rise to $10,718 from $10,356. Two board members, Anthony J. DePetris and Joseph J. Roberts Jr., voted against the hike. Fees and room and board vary slightly by campus and school.
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