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Tuition

NEWS
December 10, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Caitlyn Ricci and her parents sat on opposite sides of the Camden courtroom, emblematic of a deep family divide. On the right was Ricci, 21, wearing a solid green shirt and black dress pants, with her attorney. On the left side, seated together, were her divorced parents: middle school English teacher Maura McGarvey and varsity high school basketball coach Michael Ricci, joined by each of their attorneys. Superior Court Judge Thomas Shusted Jr. implored both sides - who have fought more than a year over who should pay Caitlyn Ricci's college tuition - to stop bickering.
NEWS
November 14, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before Caitlyn Ricci sued her parents for college tuition money, before they stopped talking, before her father accused his parents - Caitlyn's grandparents - of "tearing my family apart," the Ricci family was just trying to hold things together. Caitlyn Ricci's parents divorced in 1997, four years after her birth. Her mother has said she worked to create a caring environment - taking her to aquariums and art museums - when Caitlyn wasn't with her father. But as Caitlyn pushed age 18 and beyond, her parents said, their relationship with her grew fragile.
NEWS
September 15, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lincoln University's promise got Aitza Hedgemond's attention: The incoming freshman's annual tuition would remain at $11,836 all four years, guaranteed. It was one factor that led Hedgemond to select Lincoln, a historically black university in rural Chester County, over several other schools. "I don't have to worry about tuition going up," said Hedgemond, 18, of Burlington, who received some scholarship money but is paying for the rest herself. "I don't have to take out extra loans.
NEWS
September 1, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jonathan Jusino spent his first year out of high school as a stock clerk and sales associate at a clothing store, and found it unfulfilling. "I noticed there was no future for me in the work I was doing," he said. So Jusino enrolled at Community College of Philadelphia last fall as a first step in pursuing a teaching career. With his financial aid, it would have taken him three years to get his associate's degree. But a program introduced by the college this semester will allow him to finish in 21/2.
NEWS
July 19, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University undergraduates will pay $600 more in tuition in the fall. In-state students will pay $14,006 in tuition, up from $13,406, and those from out of state will pay $24,032, up from $23,432. Mandatory student-activity fees, assessed on top of tuition, will remain at $690. The university's trustees approved the new tuition schedule at their meeting on Thursday. They also increased funding for student financial aid by more than $9.6 million. The amount set aside to aid students now totals approximately $100 million.
NEWS
July 18, 2014
TEMPLE University announced yesterday that tuition for undergraduate students will increase by 3.7 percent starting this fall. The university's board of trustees approved the increase, which will cost students an additional $600 this coming year. Tuition will be $14,006 for in-state residents and $24,032 for out-of-state students. Mandatory fees will remain at $690. Last year, Temple had more than 28,000 undergraduate students. The board attributed the increase in tuition to enhancements in student services and contractual salary increases.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW BRUNSWICK - Tuition at Rutgers University will increase 2.2 percent for the "typical" undergraduate student this fall, the university's board of governors decided Wednesday. Base tuition in the university's most popular school - Arts and Sciences - will increase to $10,954 for the 2014-15 school year, up from $10,718. Mandatory fees will also rise. A full-time, in-state undergraduate in the School of Arts and Sciences in New Brunswick will pay $13,813 in tuition and fees next year; a similar student in Camden will pay $13,683.
NEWS
July 10, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The board governing Pennsylvania's 14 state universities on Tuesday approved a 3 percent tuition increase for 2014-15. Under the plan approved by the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education's board of governors at its meeting in Harrisburg, full-time in-state students this fall will pay a base tuition of $6,820 a year, a $198 increase from the $6,622 they paid last year. Overall, tuition, fees, and room and board for an in-state student will be $18,500 for 2014-15, up from about $18,000 this year.
NEWS
July 5, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hold on to your wallets, students at Pennsylvania's state-funded colleges. While much debate over the state's new budget has focused on aid to public schools, a less-noticed element is what the spending plan means for the colleges. It may mean higher tuition. The 14 state-run universities will face a $58 million shortfall in their combined $1.56 billion budget for the new fiscal year if Gov. Corbett signs the budget with no changes. That $29.1 billion plan includes flat funding for most higher-education institutions, including the state system.
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