CollectionsTuition
IN THE NEWS

Tuition

NEWS
September 2, 2013
For Thomas Hundley and his middle-class family, a college education has become an elusive luxury. Hundley, 22, of Cherry Hill, could be a poster child for President Obama's latest effort to curb soaring tuition costs that put a college degree out of reach for many. A political science major at Howard University in Washington, Hundley missed his senior year last year after a desperately needed $25,000 student loan was denied. "I never thought I would have to stop going to school," Hundley said in an interview.
NEWS
August 27, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tony Hall tells his five daughters they must go on to college and get their degrees, but he doesn't have one himself. "It's kind of like a hypocrite. I say a degree is important, but they don't see mine hanging there," said the 35-year-old insurance agent from Wyncote. In July, Hall set out to change that by enrolling at Strayer University, a for-profit institution that offers a primarily business curriculum and caters to working adults. His decision was largely influenced by a new offer at Strayer: tuition breaks.
BUSINESS
August 26, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
President Obama complained last week about the rising cost of a college education and student debt. Isn't that kind of like the chief pirate complaining merchant ships are getting scarce? The price of anything that's privately built but heavily U.S. taxpayer-funded - weapons, medicine, colleges - tends to rise faster than stuff that trades more or less competitively, like tomatoes or scrap metal. Obama's response: By 2015, he wants U.S. taxpayers to subsidize schools, based not just on how much they charge, or whom they let in (the poorer the better)
NEWS
July 27, 2013
Learning on the installment plan Oregon state officials have taken a bold step toward solving the tuition problem for students trying to attend public universities. With the state's new "Pay it Forward, Pay it Back" plan, approved this month, needy students will pay nothing while in school, and then only 3 percent of their income for the next two decades after getting a four-year degree. Those who attend for a shorter time would pay a prorated amount. Although this plan is in use in other countries, it has never been tried here.
NEWS
July 20, 2013
By Katrina vanden Heuvel On July 1, federal student loan rates doubled from 3.4 percent to 6.8. Meanwhile, Oregon is paving the way for students to attend public universities without paying tuition or taking out traditional loans at all. A new bill, which Gov. John Kitzhaber is expected to sign, instructs Oregon's Higher Education Coordination Commission to come up with a "Pay It Forward, Pay It Back" university financing model in time for a...
NEWS
July 13, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. - The Rutgers University board of governors decided Thursday to increase tuition and fees 3.3 percent for full-time in-state students next school year, over the shouted objections of about two dozen protesters. Tuition, which is the same at the university's campuses in New Brunswick, Camden, and Newark, will rise to $10,718 from $10,356. Two board members, Anthony J. DePetris and Joseph J. Roberts Jr., voted against the hike. Fees and room and board vary slightly by campus and school.
NEWS
July 11, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's 14 state universities, including West Chester and Cheyney, will raise tuition 3 percent, or $194, for 2013-14 under a measure approved by the board of governors Tuesday. In-state undergraduate students who attend full time will pay $6,622 annually next academic year. Nearly 90 percent of the system's students are Pennsylvanians. The technology fee will rise $10, or 2.8 percent, for in-state students, to $368 annually. Even with the revenue from the tuition increase, the state system will have to cut $50 million from its $1.6 billion budget this year, prompting concern from faculty union leadership.
NEWS
June 29, 2013 | Associated Press
TRENTON - A New Jersey Senate committee approved a bill Thursday that would allow those who are in the country illegally to qualify for in-state tuition at colleges and universities. The measure remains stalled in the Assembly and it may not go before a Senate budget panel until late August. The bill was intended to take effect for the fall semester. To be eligible, a student must have attended a New Jersey public high school for at least three years and have a diploma or the equivalent.
NEWS
June 22, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University's board of trustees voted Thursday to raise tuition and fees 3.6 percent, or $500, a departure from last year, when rates were frozen. "For this year, doing zero just wasn't possible," said Ken Kaiser, senior associate vice president for finance and human resources. In-state students will pay $14,096 in tuition and fees, up from $13,596 last year. The increase includes a $400, or 2.8 percent, tuition increase, and a $100, or 17 percent, increase in the mandatory student activity fee, which will rise to $690.
NEWS
May 10, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden County College will increase its tuition and fees slightly next school year and make budget cuts of about $1.8 million as its operating budget shrinks because of ever-rising costs and flat government funding. The school's board of trustees approved the budget at its meeting Tuesday night. The tuition and fee increases were adopted in March. Total cost per credit at Camden County College will increase $5 next year to $138 for in-county students, $142 for out-of-county students, and $217 for international students.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|