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Tuition

NEWS
December 23, 2013 | By Jan Hefler and Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writers
For Edwin Javier, the signing of New Jersey's "Dream Act" by Gov. Christie on Friday, allowing undocumented immigrants like him to pay cheaper in-state tuition at state colleges, means he now will be able to afford a university education. Javier, 21, said he had hoped to attend Rutgers-Camden when he graduated from Pennsauken High School in 2012, but could not because he was ineligible for in-state tuition. As he watched lawmakers in Trenton approve the bill Thursday - after a dramatic deal between the Republican governor and the Legislature's Democratic leadership - Javier, who at age 12 ran across the Mexico-Arizona border, realized he could now be the first in his family to go to college.
NEWS
December 14, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - A bill qualifying undocumented immigrants for in-state college tuition rates cleared an Assembly committee Thursday, moving one step toward reaching the desk of Gov. Christie - who has said he would not sign it. The apparent impasse did not stop Democratic lawmakers and supporters of the bill from celebrating its release from the Budget Committee, which dropped an earlier in-state tuition proposal and advanced the same measure - giving undocumented...
NEWS
December 6, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON A Latino leader who is an ally of Gov. Christie on Wednesday accused state Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester) of playing politics and jeopardizing a bill that would allow undocumented immigrant students to pay in-state college tuition. By insisting that the bill include access to financial aid - which Christie says he will not support - Sweeney risks losing the chance to pass tuition equality legislation long awaited by the state's Latino community, said Martin Perez, president of the Latino Leadership Alliance of New Jersey.
NEWS
December 4, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON Gov. Christie said Monday that he would not sign a bill extending in-state college tuition rates to undocumented immigrants because the students also would be allowed to receive state financial aid. Christie's explanation, given at a Statehouse news conference, came a week after the Republican governor announced on a radio show that he opposed parts of the bill passed recently by the Senate. His remarks drew accusations of flip-flopping from bill supporters, who said Christie had voiced support for tuition equality before the gubernatorial election to court Latino voters but changed his position on the politically delicate issue to prepare to run for president.
NEWS
November 28, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie drew accusations Tuesday of backpedaling in the interests of a possible presidential bid after announcing he would not support a bill helping undocumented immigrants pay for college in New Jersey. Christie, who has voiced support for tuition equality, said on a radio show Monday night that he would not sign a Senate bill allowing undocumented immigrants to pay in-state tuition at New Jersey colleges and apply for state financial aid. Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester)
NEWS
November 20, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - The New Jersey Senate approved a bill Monday that would let undocumented immigrants qualify for in-state college tuition and state financial aid. Three Republicans joined 22 Democrats in supporting the bill, following brief debate spurred by one Republican over whether it would limit the opportunities of other New Jersey students. Twelve senators opposed the measure, which now must be heard by the Assembly. "We are opening up avenues for the next generation of leaders in this state and this country," said Sen. Teresa Ruiz (D., Essex)
NEWS
November 18, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON Giancarlo Tello, 23, didn't know he was in the United States illegally until he was a sophomore in high school and his mother told him he couldn't get a driver's license. Other realizations followed: Tello, whose parents brought him to New Jersey from Peru when he was 6, learned he didn't have a Social Security number. He couldn't work, except at odd jobs. And he couldn't receive financial aid to go to college or qualify for in-state tuition. While he earned enough as a tennis coach and computer instructor to attend Bergen Community College - hitching rides from his father, who woke him at 5 a.m. and picked him up from the school at 11 p.m. - Tello couldn't afford to continue a political science major he had begun at Rutgers University, he said Thursday.
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON To tamp down college costs, New Jersey's Senate president is proposing a study of new options for students, including a program that would defer tuition at state schools. Under the so-called Pay It Forward program, students would pay a percentage of their income for a certain number of years after graduating instead of tuition up front. The concept, also proposed in Oregon and Pennsylvania, has drawn some criticism from teachers' unions and questions about its feasibility.
NEWS
November 4, 2013 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
GREETINGS, college-bound high-school seniors! Over the next few weeks, you'll wrap up your college applications. The process will be more aggravating than it was for prior seniors because the Common Application - an online marvel that lets you apply to multiple schools using one document - has gone bat-crap this year, first locking applicants out of the website then kicking them off just before they hit "send. " Of the 517 colleges and universities that use the Common App, at least 175 have no alternative form of application.
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