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NEWS
September 17, 2015 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
MANASSAS, Va. - Waving her rainbow-colored "Get Bernie on the Ballot" sign at a county fairground two hours south of the Mason-Dixon Line, Liz McCauley had no qualms in standing up in her pink tennis shoes for a presidential hopeful who calls himself "a democratic socialist. " After all, the 40-year-old lifelong Republican and former "Marine brat" says, she's stood down her dad and her brother - both Corps veterans - when they "sputter 'Socialist!' " at the mere mention of Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders.
NEWS
July 29, 2015
YOUR JULY 13 editorial, "To Their Tax Credit . . . " about the Educational Improvement Tax Credit program, ignores the fact that the program provides high-quality educational options for children and families in need. What's more, contrary to the editorial, organizations like the Children's Scholarship Fund Philadelphia provide the very highest levels of accountability when it comes to the funds it receives from donors. As Pennsylvania's largest provider of scholarship support for grades K-8, CSFP serves over 6,200 Philadelphia children in more than 175 schools who receive on average $1,900 per child, per year.
NEWS
July 19, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the first time in nearly 50 years, in-state students attending Pennsylvania State University will face no tuition increase for the next academic year. Reversing a proposal announced Thursday that would have raised tuition 2.7 percent, or $450, for in-state students attending the main campus, the university's board of trustees on Friday unanimously approved the tuition freeze. The break will require the board to cut as much as $17 million from the annual budget. The tuition break applies to Pennsylvania residents attending all of the university's 19 undergraduate campuses.
NEWS
July 18, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tuition for incoming freshmen and sophomores at Pennsylvania State University's main campus would rise 2.7 percent, or $450, for 2015-16 under a proposal passed by the board of trustees' finance committee Thursday. In-state students would pay $17,022, up from $16,572 last year, the university said. Out-of-state students also would pay more. In March, the trustees approved a 3.89 percent increase in room-and-board costs. If the tuition proposal is adopted this week, the total per-student cost, including fees, would exceed $28,100 for next year.
NEWS
July 17, 2015 | By Chris Brennan and Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writers
A private Catholic elementary school beset by controversy after firing a popular faculty member for being in a same-sex marriage is calling in help to deal with outraged parents. Nell Stetser, principal of Waldron Mercy Academy in Merion, wrote to parents and faculty Wednesday, acknowledging that the school's community "has been shaken" by the firing of Margie Winters, the school's director of religious education since 2007. "I understand that there are feelings of frustration, disappointment, betrayal, anger, and sorrow," wrote Stetser, who fired Winters on June 22 after she refused to resign.
NEWS
July 16, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University's board of trustees on Tuesday approved a 2.8 percent increase in tuition for the coming year, meaning in-state students will pay $14,398 in 2015-16, up by $392 from the last academic year. Fees for all full-time students will rise by $100, to $790, to accommodate increased costs in activities and technology, said Ken Kaiser, Temple's chief financial officer and treasurer. Students will pay $15,188 in 2015-16 for tuition and fees, up $492 (3.3 percent) from the last academic year.
NEWS
July 11, 2015 | By Erin Edinger-Turoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
Students at 14 state-owned universities will pay $240 more in tuition for the coming academic year under a plan approved Thursday by the board of governors of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education. Full-time in-state students will pay $7,060 in 2015-16, up from $6,820. The increase comes despite Gov. Wolf's call in March for state-owned universities to freeze tuition, when he proposed a $45.3 million (11 percent) bump in funding for 2015-16. "We took what we feel was an appropriate action at this point," board spokesman Kenn Marshall said, adding that universities need to start fall planning.
NEWS
July 9, 2015 | By Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writer
The college transition brings with it the stress of packing, making friends, and getting adjusted to a new learning environment. For international students, coming to a new country also involves an additional anxiety: fitting in. For the first time, the Haddonfield School District is working to ease that transition for some high-achieving students from China, Superintendent Richard Perry said. In September, Haddonfield Memorial High School plans to enroll four students - one junior and three seniors - from southern China's Guangdong Country Garden School for stays of 10 to 12 months.
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON - New Jersey's colleges should reconsider the traditional "high aid, high tuition" funding model long in place, a task force on college affordability was told Wednesday. Steven M. Rose, president of Passaic County Community College, said he believed the funding model had grown unconsciously over time: When the state cut or limited funding, public colleges and universities would raise tuition, and the state money would go toward financial aid instead. Students from wealthy families can pay full price, Rose said, and students from low-income families can receive financial aid. But the students in the middle can get caught in the gap between being able to afford college and qualifying for need-based financial aid, said Rose, who also is chairman of the New Jersey Presidents' Council, an organization of the state's college and university presidents.
NEWS
April 29, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's 14 state universities raised tuition 27 percent over six years, and a state audit report released Monday says that while stagnant state aid is largely to blame, the system should do better. "Despite laudable efforts to hold down costs, the state system must look for additional ways to minimize tuition hikes, cut costs, and increase enrollment," said Auditor General Eugene D. DePasquale. The 59-page report, which was largely positive, noted that while the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education offers one of the most affordable options, "many students and families across the commonwealth are concerned that attaining a PASSHE education is becoming out of reach.
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