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Tuition

NEWS
April 29, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's 14 state universities raised tuition 27 percent over six years, and a state audit report released Monday says that while stagnant state aid is largely to blame, the system should do better. "Despite laudable efforts to hold down costs, the state system must look for additional ways to minimize tuition hikes, cut costs, and increase enrollment," said Auditor General Eugene D. DePasquale. The 59-page report, which was largely positive, noted that while the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education offers one of the most affordable options, "many students and families across the commonwealth are concerned that attaining a PASSHE education is becoming out of reach.
NEWS
April 10, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Several hundred undocumented immigrants are benefiting from a law enacted in late 2013 letting them pay in-state tuition at New Jersey colleges and universities, according to a new report. Last year, 251 new undergraduate students took advantage of the law, along with 113 continuing students, according to the report by New Jersey Policy Perspective (NJPP), a liberal-leaning think tank. Colleges provided the figures, which are tracked because the law requires students to submit affidavits that say they will agree to pursue legal status if federal law changes.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2015
DREXEL University junior Zakiya James didn't graduate from high school, or even spend much time there. She never took the SATs or got a GED. None of that stopped the 17-year-old from becoming a Drexel Dragon in January. Since transferring to the school, she has been thriving, taking a host of heavy-duty engineering courses. But there's one small problem: Zakiya's parents can't afford Drexel's pricey tuition. Not by a long shot. Her mother, who works as a medical receptionist in Washington, D.C., was able to make Zakiya's housing deposit and gave her money for books, but that was pretty much it. Zakiya has gotten financial aid from the school, but she is faced with the onerous task of coming up with the rest of the money she needs for tuition on her own. It's heartbreaking.
NEWS
April 6, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
President Obama's proposal to make community college free for most students may never get through Congress. But for freshly graduated high school students from Philadelphia's low-income families, that might not matter. Community College of Philadelphia has decided to help pay their way. The school is doing away with tuition for all seniors graduating from a city high school this spring who have low-enough family incomes to qualify for federal Pell grants and who meet certain other requirements.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | BY ABBY CRUZ, Daily News Staff Writer cruza@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
WORKING full time and being a full-time father is challenging work, but Robert Kersey Jr. was up to it. In fact, he loved nothing more than being a dad; it was his favorite job. He was not only a father to his three sons, but Robert also was a father figure to every member of his family, as well as his friends and neighborhood youths. Robert Kersey Jr., who rose from being a janitor to buying, rehabilitating and selling properties throughout Philadelphia, died March 18. He was 76. Robert was the second of three children born to Robert Kersey Sr. and Lavinia Kersey.
NEWS
March 5, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
After years of flat or declining funding, Pennsylvania's state universities and community colleges were thrilled to see Gov. Wolf propose significant increases Tuesday. But there are strings attached to the governor's budget proposal: Wolf asked the colleges to freeze tuition for next year. "And I expect them to answer that call," Wolf said during his address. Under Wolf's proposal, the 14 universities in the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education would receive an increase of $45.3 million, 11 percent, in funding for 2015-16, raising the total allocation to $458 million.
SPORTS
January 16, 2015 | DAILY NEWS STAFF REPORT
CONWELL-EGAN High is giving eighth-graders a chance to attend the school next year for half the usual tuition. The catch? Contestants have to make a halfcourt shot at tomorrow's Archbishop Wood at Conwell-Egan game, which begins at 7 p.m. The contest is open to eighth-grade boys and girls. All participants must preregister by calling the school at 215-945-6200 or visiting conwell-egan.org. Contestants will be offered free admission to the game and must check in before the end of the first quarter.
NEWS
January 16, 2015
WILL BUNCH informs us ("Free to be - and not be - Charlie"), that he and his colleagues at the Daily News disapprove of the crude humor in Charlie Hebdo , and so will not print the cartoons that led to mass murder in Paris. A month ago, there was perhaps a place for Mr. Bunch's nuanced editorial judgments about what is, and what is not, proper. Now, however, the cartoons are at the heart of the biggest news story in the world and you are a newspaper. How can you not publish them?
NEWS
January 13, 2015
THERE'S LITTLE not to like in President Obama's idea to provide free tuition for community-college students, which he announced last week. The idea, which would require Congressional approval, would provide a free two-year tuition ride for students meeting certain criteria, including keeping a 2.5 grade-point average. Obama touted it as a plan that would help students finance the first half of a bachelor's degree. He intends to address the proposal further in his State of the Union address next week.
NEWS
January 13, 2015
LESS THAN TWO WEEKS after Christmas, Santa Claus is back - this time wearing a Barack Obama mask, pulling the gift of "free tuition" out of his sack. The idea came out of leftfield, following his bold moves on illegal immigration, climate control with China and opening a door to Cuba. Santa Claus has gifts only for good children, and Santa Obama has a few strings on his proposal, called America's College Promise. Before we analyze the content, let's agree on two things: First, the tuition is "free" to students, but the bill will be paid by the government, meaning you. Second, since the money goes to the colleges, it motivates them to enroll as many students as possible and to keep them eligible as long as possible.
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