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Tuition

NEWS
July 16, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University's board of trustees on Tuesday approved a 2.8 percent increase in tuition for the coming year, meaning in-state students will pay $14,398 in 2015-16, up by $392 from the last academic year. Fees for all full-time students will rise by $100, to $790, to accommodate increased costs in activities and technology, said Ken Kaiser, Temple's chief financial officer and treasurer. Students will pay $15,188 in 2015-16 for tuition and fees, up $492 (3.3 percent) from the last academic year.
NEWS
July 11, 2015 | By Erin Edinger-Turoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
Students at 14 state-owned universities will pay $240 more in tuition for the coming academic year under a plan approved Thursday by the board of governors of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education. Full-time in-state students will pay $7,060 in 2015-16, up from $6,820. The increase comes despite Gov. Wolf's call in March for state-owned universities to freeze tuition, when he proposed a $45.3 million (11 percent) bump in funding for 2015-16. "We took what we feel was an appropriate action at this point," board spokesman Kenn Marshall said, adding that universities need to start fall planning.
NEWS
July 9, 2015 | By Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writer
The college transition brings with it the stress of packing, making friends, and getting adjusted to a new learning environment. For international students, coming to a new country also involves an additional anxiety: fitting in. For the first time, the Haddonfield School District is working to ease that transition for some high-achieving students from China, Superintendent Richard Perry said. In September, Haddonfield Memorial High School plans to enroll four students - one junior and three seniors - from southern China's Guangdong Country Garden School for stays of 10 to 12 months.
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON - New Jersey's colleges should reconsider the traditional "high aid, high tuition" funding model long in place, a task force on college affordability was told Wednesday. Steven M. Rose, president of Passaic County Community College, said he believed the funding model had grown unconsciously over time: When the state cut or limited funding, public colleges and universities would raise tuition, and the state money would go toward financial aid instead. Students from wealthy families can pay full price, Rose said, and students from low-income families can receive financial aid. But the students in the middle can get caught in the gap between being able to afford college and qualifying for need-based financial aid, said Rose, who also is chairman of the New Jersey Presidents' Council, an organization of the state's college and university presidents.
NEWS
April 29, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's 14 state universities raised tuition 27 percent over six years, and a state audit report released Monday says that while stagnant state aid is largely to blame, the system should do better. "Despite laudable efforts to hold down costs, the state system must look for additional ways to minimize tuition hikes, cut costs, and increase enrollment," said Auditor General Eugene D. DePasquale. The 59-page report, which was largely positive, noted that while the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education offers one of the most affordable options, "many students and families across the commonwealth are concerned that attaining a PASSHE education is becoming out of reach.
NEWS
April 10, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Several hundred undocumented immigrants are benefiting from a law enacted in late 2013 letting them pay in-state tuition at New Jersey colleges and universities, according to a new report. Last year, 251 new undergraduate students took advantage of the law, along with 113 continuing students, according to the report by New Jersey Policy Perspective (NJPP), a liberal-leaning think tank. Colleges provided the figures, which are tracked because the law requires students to submit affidavits that say they will agree to pursue legal status if federal law changes.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2015
DREXEL University junior Zakiya James didn't graduate from high school, or even spend much time there. She never took the SATs or got a GED. None of that stopped the 17-year-old from becoming a Drexel Dragon in January. Since transferring to the school, she has been thriving, taking a host of heavy-duty engineering courses. But there's one small problem: Zakiya's parents can't afford Drexel's pricey tuition. Not by a long shot. Her mother, who works as a medical receptionist in Washington, D.C., was able to make Zakiya's housing deposit and gave her money for books, but that was pretty much it. Zakiya has gotten financial aid from the school, but she is faced with the onerous task of coming up with the rest of the money she needs for tuition on her own. It's heartbreaking.
NEWS
April 6, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
President Obama's proposal to make community college free for most students may never get through Congress. But for freshly graduated high school students from Philadelphia's low-income families, that might not matter. Community College of Philadelphia has decided to help pay their way. The school is doing away with tuition for all seniors graduating from a city high school this spring who have low-enough family incomes to qualify for federal Pell grants and who meet certain other requirements.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | BY ABBY CRUZ, Daily News Staff Writer cruza@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
WORKING full time and being a full-time father is challenging work, but Robert Kersey Jr. was up to it. In fact, he loved nothing more than being a dad; it was his favorite job. He was not only a father to his three sons, but Robert also was a father figure to every member of his family, as well as his friends and neighborhood youths. Robert Kersey Jr., who rose from being a janitor to buying, rehabilitating and selling properties throughout Philadelphia, died March 18. He was 76. Robert was the second of three children born to Robert Kersey Sr. and Lavinia Kersey.
NEWS
March 5, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
After years of flat or declining funding, Pennsylvania's state universities and community colleges were thrilled to see Gov. Wolf propose significant increases Tuesday. But there are strings attached to the governor's budget proposal: Wolf asked the colleges to freeze tuition for next year. "And I expect them to answer that call," Wolf said during his address. Under Wolf's proposal, the 14 universities in the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education would receive an increase of $45.3 million, 11 percent, in funding for 2015-16, raising the total allocation to $458 million.
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