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Tumor

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NEWS
March 9, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
With surgery and chemotherapy, Roberta Bash, 67, of Downingtown beat advanced-stage ovarian cancer in 2010. Then, it came back. "Cancer can go dormant, and I didn't know that," she said. The second time, Bash wanted to explore all her options - including an experimental treatment at Penn Medicine that manipulates a patient's tumor cells to trigger an immune response. So, during her surgery last March, instead of allowing her tumor to be tossed out or donated for research, she saved it. The company StoreMyTumor, which markets itself as a concierge service for tumors, negotiated the tissue's harvest, processing, and cryopreservation.
SPORTS
January 23, 2008 | Daily News Wire Services
A testicular tumor removed from Denver Nuggets forward Nene was malignant. The team said yesterday the tumor was discovered early, and tests showed the cancer was isolated. "The recovery rate is extremely high," the Nuggets said in a written statement. "In addition, the odds of a recurrence are very small. " The Brazilian player underwent surgery Jan. 14 to remove the tumor. The team said he was doing well, but there was no timetable for his return. Nene's Web site had posted a statement last week saying the tumor was benign, but that announcement later was removed.
SPORTS
October 13, 2008 | Daily News Wire Services
After a career full of miraculous shots - including one from a parking lot during his first British Open win - Seve Ballesteros was preparing for the "hardest challenge" of his life yesterday after announcing he has a brain tumor. The 51-year-old Ballesteros was set to undergo a biopsy tomorrow before doctors determine how to proceed. "Throughout my career I have been among the best at overcoming challenges on the golf course," the five-time major winner said in a statement released by Madrid's La Paz hospital.
SPORTS
July 31, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
New York Yankees first baseman Jason Giambi has been diagnosed with a benign tumor, but is expected to return to the team later this season after treatment. The Yankees announced last night that Giambi was placed on the 15-day disabled list and will be treated immediately. The team, citing privacy issues, declined to divulge where the tumor is or what type of treatment Giambi will have. Yankees manager Joe Torre said he didn't believe surgery would be necessary. General manager Brian Cashman said: "I think the next few days, he'll be treated and we'll see how he's feeling.
NEWS
July 14, 2011 | By Fabiola Sanchez, Associated Press
CARACAS, Venezuela - Nearly two weeks after announcing he has cancer, President Hugo Chavez on Wednesday described a baseball-size tumor that was removed in surgery and a prognosis that includes chemotherapy or radiation treatment. Chavez provided his most extensive account to date of his illness, suggesting that difficult months may lie ahead as he anticipates physically taxing treatments while also remaining in the presidency. It was the first time he has referred to expecting chemotherapy or radiation treatment after the June 20 surgery in Cuba.
NEWS
January 6, 2005 | By Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Timothy Michael Kaisinger, 25, whose childhood battle with a brain tumor touched many people and fed public-policy debate, died Monday of respiratory complications from the disease he had fought since 1988. Mr. Kaisinger, formerly of the Bridesburg section of Philadelphia, lived in Turnersville. "He was a warrior," said his father, Timothy J. Kaisinger, who saw his son baffle medical experts with his resiliency. By 1989, doctors had all but surrendered Mr. Kaisinger to the ravages of a huge tumor in his brain.
SPORTS
May 9, 2001 | by Dana Pennett O'Neil Daily News Sports Writer Daily News sports writer Paul Hagen contributed to this report
With one word, Dr. David Andrews put a number of minds at ease. Benign. That was the diagnosis following brain surgery yesterday on Phillies third-base coach John Vukovich. Andrews, a neurosurgeon at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, performed the 90-minute surgery, removing part of a 4-centimeter, low-grade tumor that was discovered over the weekend. This type of tumor, the cause of which is unknown, will continue to grow, but with periodic MRI exams, doctors will be able to monitor its growth and treat it accordingly.
NEWS
January 11, 2011 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
In his first TV chat since being treated for throat cancer, Michael Douglas says he's "relieved" that the tumor that plagued him for months has disappeared. "I feel good, relieved. The tumor is gone," Douglas tells Matt Lauer in a chat set to air Tuesday on Today . "But, you know, I have to check out on a monthly basis now to maintain. I guess there's not a total euphoria. " Catherine Zeta-Jones ' hub adds, "It's been a wild six-month ride. " Douglas' treatment hasn't all been fun and games: There are side effects.
SPORTS
March 30, 2011 | Associated Press
SYRACUSE, N.Y. - Doctors have told former Syracuse University punter Rob Long that all signs of a brain tumor have disappeared. An MRI of Long's brain taken Friday at Kimmel Cancer Center in Philadelphia showed no more signs of the tumor that was discovered in December. Long, a co-captain and 4-year starter for the Orange, was diagnosed in early December with a large tumor. Originally thought to be benign, doctors found malignant cells, and Long moved back home to Downingtown, where he had attended Downingtown West High.
SPORTS
October 16, 2008 | Daily News Wire Services
Seve Ballesteros was in stable condition yesterday after the 51-year-old golf great had surgery on a brain tumor a day earlier. La Paz Hospital said were no complications from the surgery. Spanish state news agency Efe reported the operation lasted 12 hours. The hospital said a sizable part of the Spaniard's tumor was removed. It was not immediately known if it was malignant and it would be several days before the results were announced. "At the moment he is conscious and stable, although he will not be able to receive any visitors in the coming days until he has recovered from the surgical process," the hospital said in a statement.
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NEWS
August 4, 2014 | By Joan Capuzzi, V.M.D., For The Inquirer
By feline standards, Zeb was a social cat. He spent much of his time in the kitchen, where he could mingle with his owners and the other family pets. But two years ago, his behavior started to change. His owners, Ricki and Ed Johnson of Schwenksville, would often find him hiding in a box. He became lethargic and seemed to have difficulty eating. The 9-year-old domestic shorthair started defecating in an indoor potted plant and urinating in a closet - not unusual for some cats, perhaps, but Zeb had always been fastidious.
NEWS
March 24, 2014 | By Dr.William B. McNamee Jr., For The Inquirer
Her three sisters brought her to the emergency room at Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital. For the last month she had been having increasing problems with thinking and she could no longer walk on her own. One month before, she was living independently with her daughter in Virginia, but now she looked to her sisters a lot like their elderly mother who died a few years ago of Alzheimer's disease. How could this happen almost overnight? In the emergency room, her vital signs were normal and she could tell the doctors the right place, month, and year.
NEWS
March 9, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
With surgery and chemotherapy, Roberta Bash, 67, of Downingtown beat advanced-stage ovarian cancer in 2010. Then, it came back. "Cancer can go dormant, and I didn't know that," she said. The second time, Bash wanted to explore all her options - including an experimental treatment at Penn Medicine that manipulates a patient's tumor cells to trigger an immune response. So, during her surgery last March, instead of allowing her tumor to be tossed out or donated for research, she saved it. The company StoreMyTumor, which markets itself as a concierge service for tumors, negotiated the tissue's harvest, processing, and cryopreservation.
NEWS
October 28, 2013 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Some call it the "icing on the cake. " Others deem it the "illusion of a protrusion. " But for Patricia Missiras, 57, of Brookhaven, having 3-D areolas and nipples tattooed to her reconstructed breasts goes much deeper. It's part of her quest to put her bilateral mastectomy, chemo, and radiation firmly in the rear-view mirror. "I want to look as normal as I did before," she says. "I know it's not going to look exactly the same, but I want to get back to where I was before all of this happened.
SPORTS
June 28, 2013 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is news no family wants to hear once and now, for the third time in a decade, the Phillies family is dealing with it again. Darren Daulton has two brain tumors. The news about the unquestioned leader of the 1993 Phillies National League championship team first broke Thursday afternoon in a statement released by 97.5 The Fanatic, the radio station that carries Daulton's weeknight program "Talking Baseball with Dutch. " The statement said that Daulton is scheduled for surgery early next week.
NEWS
May 9, 2013 | By Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press
A new genetic test to gauge the aggressiveness of prostate cancer may help tens of thousands of men each year decide whether they need to treat their cancer right away or can safely monitor it. The new test, which goes on sale Wednesday, joins another one that recently came on the market. Both analyze multiple genes in a biopsy sample and give a score for aggressiveness, similar to tests used now for certain breast and colon cancers. Doctors say tests like these have the potential to curb a major problem in cancer care - overtreatment.
NEWS
May 6, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
While preparing to remove a malignant tumor from the Rev. Michael Prewitt's brain, neurosurgeon Steven Brem of the University of Pennsylvania worried that the surgery could affect his patient's ability to speak or move. As surgeons have for decades, he studied an MRI that showed the tumor in Prewitt's left parietal lobe. But he also examined a type of scan you've probably never heard of: diffusion tensor imaging. It shows bundles of the fibers that transmit messages from parts of the brain to one another and the brain stem.
NEWS
April 26, 2013 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
SANDRA STEWART of Mayfair was shocked when her daughter, Corin, who had just celebrated her fifth birthday, awoke on Martin Luther King Day, Jan. 20, 2009, with a protruding left eye. Stewart took Corin to a pediatric eye specialist at Holy Redeemer Hospital. "He tells me right away that there's a tumor behind her left eye and it could be cancer," Stewart said. After a CAT scan at St. Christopher's Hospital for Children and a biopsy at Wills Eye Institute, Stewart said: "The doctors told us it was malignant.
NEWS
April 23, 2013
WILMINGTON - The autopsy of a Texas man who killed his former daughter-in-law and another woman at a Delaware courthouse shows he had a brain tumor. The autopsy report of Thomas Matusiewicz, 68, says a large tumor known as a meningioma was found. Authorities say Matusiewicz killed himself after the courthouse shooting Feb. 11. His widow, Lenore, had sought an independent autopsy, saying she believed an untreated brain tumor was to blame for her husband's violent actions. Matusiewicz was cremated shortly after the state released his body.
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