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Tumor

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NEWS
March 9, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
With surgery and chemotherapy, Roberta Bash, 67, of Downingtown beat advanced-stage ovarian cancer in 2010. Then, it came back. "Cancer can go dormant, and I didn't know that," she said. The second time, Bash wanted to explore all her options - including an experimental treatment at Penn Medicine that manipulates a patient's tumor cells to trigger an immune response. So, during her surgery last March, instead of allowing her tumor to be tossed out or donated for research, she saved it. The company StoreMyTumor, which markets itself as a concierge service for tumors, negotiated the tissue's harvest, processing, and cryopreservation.
NEWS
December 14, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Christopher Teti was diagnosed with aggressive brain cancer in 2011, Kevin D. Judy performed traditional surgery at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. He removed a portion of Teti's skull and cut out the tumor. When a second tumor showed up this year, Judy tried a far less intrusive approach. He and colleagues drilled a dime-size hole in the patient's skull, inserted a slender, laser-emitting wand, and destroyed the malignant growth with heat. Aside from the drilling part, Judy did the procedure from a separate room, pushing down on a foot pedal to turn on the laser inside Teti's skull.
SPORTS
January 23, 2008 | Daily News Wire Services
A testicular tumor removed from Denver Nuggets forward Nene was malignant. The team said yesterday the tumor was discovered early, and tests showed the cancer was isolated. "The recovery rate is extremely high," the Nuggets said in a written statement. "In addition, the odds of a recurrence are very small. " The Brazilian player underwent surgery Jan. 14 to remove the tumor. The team said he was doing well, but there was no timetable for his return. Nene's Web site had posted a statement last week saying the tumor was benign, but that announcement later was removed.
SPORTS
October 13, 2008 | Daily News Wire Services
After a career full of miraculous shots - including one from a parking lot during his first British Open win - Seve Ballesteros was preparing for the "hardest challenge" of his life yesterday after announcing he has a brain tumor. The 51-year-old Ballesteros was set to undergo a biopsy tomorrow before doctors determine how to proceed. "Throughout my career I have been among the best at overcoming challenges on the golf course," the five-time major winner said in a statement released by Madrid's La Paz hospital.
SPORTS
July 31, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
New York Yankees first baseman Jason Giambi has been diagnosed with a benign tumor, but is expected to return to the team later this season after treatment. The Yankees announced last night that Giambi was placed on the 15-day disabled list and will be treated immediately. The team, citing privacy issues, declined to divulge where the tumor is or what type of treatment Giambi will have. Yankees manager Joe Torre said he didn't believe surgery would be necessary. General manager Brian Cashman said: "I think the next few days, he'll be treated and we'll see how he's feeling.
NEWS
July 14, 2011 | By Fabiola Sanchez, Associated Press
CARACAS, Venezuela - Nearly two weeks after announcing he has cancer, President Hugo Chavez on Wednesday described a baseball-size tumor that was removed in surgery and a prognosis that includes chemotherapy or radiation treatment. Chavez provided his most extensive account to date of his illness, suggesting that difficult months may lie ahead as he anticipates physically taxing treatments while also remaining in the presidency. It was the first time he has referred to expecting chemotherapy or radiation treatment after the June 20 surgery in Cuba.
NEWS
January 6, 2005 | By Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Timothy Michael Kaisinger, 25, whose childhood battle with a brain tumor touched many people and fed public-policy debate, died Monday of respiratory complications from the disease he had fought since 1988. Mr. Kaisinger, formerly of the Bridesburg section of Philadelphia, lived in Turnersville. "He was a warrior," said his father, Timothy J. Kaisinger, who saw his son baffle medical experts with his resiliency. By 1989, doctors had all but surrendered Mr. Kaisinger to the ravages of a huge tumor in his brain.
SPORTS
May 9, 2001 | by Dana Pennett O'Neil Daily News Sports Writer Daily News sports writer Paul Hagen contributed to this report
With one word, Dr. David Andrews put a number of minds at ease. Benign. That was the diagnosis following brain surgery yesterday on Phillies third-base coach John Vukovich. Andrews, a neurosurgeon at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, performed the 90-minute surgery, removing part of a 4-centimeter, low-grade tumor that was discovered over the weekend. This type of tumor, the cause of which is unknown, will continue to grow, but with periodic MRI exams, doctors will be able to monitor its growth and treat it accordingly.
NEWS
January 11, 2011 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
In his first TV chat since being treated for throat cancer, Michael Douglas says he's "relieved" that the tumor that plagued him for months has disappeared. "I feel good, relieved. The tumor is gone," Douglas tells Matt Lauer in a chat set to air Tuesday on Today . "But, you know, I have to check out on a monthly basis now to maintain. I guess there's not a total euphoria. " Catherine Zeta-Jones ' hub adds, "It's been a wild six-month ride. " Douglas' treatment hasn't all been fun and games: There are side effects.
SPORTS
March 30, 2011 | Associated Press
SYRACUSE, N.Y. - Doctors have told former Syracuse University punter Rob Long that all signs of a brain tumor have disappeared. An MRI of Long's brain taken Friday at Kimmel Cancer Center in Philadelphia showed no more signs of the tumor that was discovered in December. Long, a co-captain and 4-year starter for the Orange, was diagnosed in early December with a large tumor. Originally thought to be benign, doctors found malignant cells, and Long moved back home to Downingtown, where he had attended Downingtown West High.
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NEWS
April 24, 2016
* JUST HOW SMART are dogs? More than we give them credit for, scientists say. The average dog's intelligence is estimated to be at the same level as that of a 2.5-year-old toddler - curious and creative. Researchers say dogs can read human cues, show emotional connection to their owners, display jealousy and learn hundreds of words. * Cats as well as dogs can become ill from a new strain of canine influenza (H3N2) virus, according to the Shelter Medicine Program at the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine.
NEWS
November 25, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
WE INTERRUPT my usual "You gotta do better, people!" rant with a column full of gratitude. I know . . . let's embrace the fleeting moment. It was kind of a nutty idea, I admit. But after hearing Jennifer Pownall's story, I couldn't resist. The Northeast Philly mom was diagnosed with three meningioma brain tumors last year. Sometimes, she told me, music was the only thing that got her through the pain. So, she created the Rock Out Brain Tumors Air Guitar Challenge to raise money for the National Brain Tumor Society by asking people to make videos of themselves rocking out for a good cause.
NEWS
November 24, 2015 | By Joe Brandt, Daily News Staff Writer
In the weeks after Pope Francis blessed their ailing daughter during his visit to Philadelphia, Joe and Kristen Masciantonio probably spent more time in the cancer ward at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia than at Mass at St. Cyril of Jerusalem in Bucks County. But last week, Joe said, scans showed that a troublesome tumor in 1-year-old Gianna's brain shrank significantly after rounds and rounds of surgeries and chemotherapy, to the point where it's "basically gone. " The girl's stunning reversal of fortune - following a dire diagnosis from her doctors - led one family friend to call Gianna's encounter with the pontiff "the Miracle on Market Street.
NEWS
November 24, 2015 | BY JOE BRANDT, Daily News Staff Writer brandtj@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
IN THE WEEKS after Pope Francis blessed their ailing daughter during his visit to Philadelphia, Joe and Kristen Masciantonio probably spent more time in the cancer ward at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia than at Mass at St. Cyril of Jerusalem Church in Jamison. But last week, Joe said, scans showed that a troublesome tumor in 1-year-old Gianna's brain shrank significantly after rounds and rounds of surgeries and chemotherapy, to the point where it's "basically gone. " The tot's stunning reversal of fortune - which came after a dire diagnosis from her doctors - led one family friend to call Gianna's encounter with the pontiff "the Miracle on Market Street.
SPORTS
October 11, 2015 | BY JEFF NEIBURG, Daily News Staff Writer neiburj@phillynews.com
SUNRISE, Fla. - Early yesterday afternoon, the Flyers made an announcement no organization ever wants to make. Logan Pyett, a Canadian defenseman with the Flyers' AHL affiliate, the Lehigh Valley Phantoms, was diagnosed with sarcoma, a malignant tumor, in his upper left leg. Sarcoma is a rare form of cancer that affects soft tissue. Pyett, 27, who signed a one-year contract this offseason after two years in Russia's KHL, is out indefinitely. Pyett played as recently as the Phantoms' Sept.
SPORTS
October 9, 2015 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
On April 9, 2014, while sitting with doctors at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Nick and Ashley DeCapria got the news that no parent ever wants to hear: that their 2-year-old son, Vhito, had just two weeks to live. Vhito, now 4, was diagnosed with a rare form of cancer, an atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT). A tumor the size of a pineapple was immediately drained of two liters of fluid. Aggressive radiation and chemotherapy started three days later. "It hit us like a rock," Nick DeCapria.
SPORTS
October 5, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sean Sanchirico has simple aspirations at this stage of his life: take classes at Rutgers Camden, spend time with family and friends, improve his game as a member of the Scarlet Raptors golf team. "Just be a normal college student," Sanchirico said, setting the bar at a level that always seemed unattainable in recent years. In one way, the 20-year-old from Haddon Township has made good on his goal. His days are pretty pedestrian for a popular pre-business major who can be found many afternoons at the Camden County Golf Academy driving range on Cooper River in Pennsauken.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2015 | By Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
Mia is the kind of woman who once made a list of 257 must-haves in a future mate, including a sense of humor and an affinity for avocados. She assembled a wedding binder before Dan had even proposed and picked out a name for their firstborn before the baby was conceived. When that child, Judah, was 2, Mia - intent on conceiving again - endured Clomid injections, ovarian cysts, and surgery for endometriosis. She started acupuncture. She and Dan consulted a reproductive endocrinologist.
NEWS
April 12, 2015 | By Dr. Jeffrey Miller, For The Inquirer
By the time A.A. arrived in my office, she had spent almost a year looking for answers. In November 2012, she was 45 and struggling to lose weight and keep her blood pressure down. What sounds like a common scenario, however, was anything but. A.A. was experiencing fatigue and malaise, and the area around her eyes bruised easily. Another puzzling symptom: She said she was acutely aware of her neck. It wasn't pain, but awareness. She was losing more hair than usual in her brush and had stopped menstruating, and her skin broke open easily.
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