CollectionsTuna
IN THE NEWS

Tuna

FEATURED ARTICLES
FOOD
June 30, 2016
Makes 4 servings 1/4 fennel bulb, cut into quarters 1/2 red onion, quartered 1 celery stalk, coarsely chopped 2 whole garlic cloves, peeled 1 bay leaf 1 carrot, quartered 1/2 tablespoon black peppercorns Pinch of crushed red pepper 1 pound sushi-grade yellowfin tuna loin, cut into 2½- to 3-inch slices Generous amount of salt Mild olive oil (not extra virgin; ligurian is preferred) 1. Fill a large, wide braiser with at least 6-inch sides 2/3 full with water, and set over medium high heat.
FOOD
June 25, 2009
As a chef, my favorite tuna has always been the yellowfin packed in olive oil because of its taste and meaty texture. But I now realize that, as a consumer, it is so much more complicated than just good taste. All the tunas on this list are good tasting, but are also high in omega-3s, contain no additives, and were all fished in American or Asian waters, where fishing methods yield a catch with lower mercury levels. American Tuna Pole Caught Wild Albacore was judged the best overall because of its taste, rich natural oils, low mercury, superior texture, high omega-3s, and because it is cooked only once in the can. It also contains no additives and is caught and packed by fishing families in the mainland United States.
SPORTS
December 11, 2006 | Daily News Wire Services
BILL PARCELLS used to teasingly refer to Sean Payton as "Dennis the Menace. " There's no telling what Parcells might call his former assistant now. Payton outsmarted his old boss early, then had some fun at his expense with an onside kick later, once the New Orleans Saints were well on their way to a 42-17 victory over host Dallas last night. Having spent the last 3 years on Parcells' staff, Payton knew exactly how to attack the Cowboys - and Drew Brees pulled it off perfectly, tying his career high with five touchdown passes, all before the third quarter ended.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2002 | By LAUREN MCCUTCHEON For the Daily News
Backyard cookouts are part of the July Fourth tradition. But by July 5 or 6, burger and dog lovers might be ready to grill something new. Dave and Amy Rihl, owners of the Hula Grill on the Ocean City boardwalk, suggest trying fresh yellowfin (or Ahi) tuna steaks, which are inspired by the abundant seafood and Asian-influenced cuisine of Hawaii's North Shore. The recipe calls for ingredients easily found in Asian markets and specialty grocery stores and makes four sandwiches.
FOOD
March 23, 1994 | by Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
Heart-healthy food is hiding in your cabinet. We're talking about canned fish - tuna, of course, but don't forget convenient salmon-in-a-can. It can stand in for the far pricier fresh or frozen version in combinations and casseroles, with no nutritional loss. And salmon instead of tuna can add variety to those lunchtime sandwich spreads. Both tuna and salmon are good sources of omega-3 fatty acids, those wonderful substances that make fish oils so good for your cholesterol and triglyceride levels.
NEWS
October 21, 1989 | By Toni Locy, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Jeffrey Taylor contributed to this report
For Mayor Goode, a 51-year-old workaholic who rarely strolls, but races when he walks, Thursday was one of those stressful days that wouldn't end. Several hours after Goode listened to top city officials vent their anger at him and each other during a 10-hour gripe session, he was rushed to the hospital with head and neck pain, a racing heart beat and soaring blood pressure. After a battery of tests, Dr. Arthur Whereat, a cardiologist at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, said Goode is not seriously ill and did not have a heart attack or heart problems.
NEWS
April 19, 1990 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pressed to recall when it was that he first started worrying about tuna nets and dolphin slaughter, Scott Hall raised his eyebrows and said, "MTV. " MTV, the cable channel where teenagers tune in to Madonna the vamp, Aerosmith the androgynous and Guns N' Roses the outlaws, also has a show about the environment. The new generation, explained Hall, is less egocentric than the last. In the meantime, a new medium has matured with a degree of social conscience. This is how reform movements are born.
NEWS
June 12, 2011 | By Don Melvin, Associated Press
ABOARD THE STEVE IRWIN - Tuna fishermen battled environmentalists on the Mediterranean, hurling heavy links of chain at them as the environmentalists tried to disrupt illegal tuna fishing under the no-fly zone north of Libya on Saturday. The fishermen also tried to lay a rope in front of the activists' boat, the Steve Irwin - owned by the U.S. group the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society - hoping to disable it. Environmentalists responded with fire hoses and stink bombs. Several hundred feet above the fray circled a French fighter jet summoned by the fishermen, who claimed, falsely, that activist divers were trying to cut their net. The 195-foot Steve Irwin, named after the Australian conservationist who died in 2006, left the Sicilian port of Syracuse early Friday, heading for a rendezvous with a smaller, faster sister ship, the Brigitte Bardot, just north of Libyan waters.
NEWS
April 14, 2004
'Plain Talk About Canned Tuna: A Safe & Healthy Food for Everyone. " That's the claim of a full-page advertisement that has begun appearing in newspapers and magazines, placed by (you guessed it) the U.S. Tuna Foundation. "America learned this week that tuna, and many other fish, can contain harmful levels of toxic mercury," says a competing ad, placed by the Natural Resources Defense Council and MoveOn.org, an activist group. Who's right? What's a consumer to do? Many people are responding with what they believe is the "safe" choice: Passing on the tuna melt, retiring the tuna casserole, opting for turkey on rye. Just as some health-conscious consumers have culled beef and farm-raised salmon from their grocery lists because of mad-cow and cancer fears, they're dropping tuna because of warnings over mercury levels.
NEWS
December 7, 2009 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Tuna, Texas, is the locale of a trilogy of plays from a trilogy of writers: Joe Sears, Jaston Williams, and Ed Howard. Opening the Walnut's Independence Studio season for the third year with a "Tuna" holiday show, this latest entry, Red, White and Tuna, following two hilarious hits, is a definite miss. "This place has gone from mean to meaner," says one resident, and he's right. Of course, these rednecks were always mean as well as bizarre, but they seemed, in their eccentricities and loyalties and feuds and intrigues and romances, somehow also lovable and endearing.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
June 30, 2016
Makes 4 servings 1/4 fennel bulb, cut into quarters 1/2 red onion, quartered 1 celery stalk, coarsely chopped 2 whole garlic cloves, peeled 1 bay leaf 1 carrot, quartered 1/2 tablespoon black peppercorns Pinch of crushed red pepper 1 pound sushi-grade yellowfin tuna loin, cut into 2½- to 3-inch slices Generous amount of salt Mild olive oil (not extra virgin; ligurian is preferred) 1. Fill a large, wide braiser with at least 6-inch sides 2/3 full with water, and set over medium high heat.
FOOD
June 17, 2016
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat of June 14, 2016: Craig LaBan:  Here's one notable update from the Department of Disappointments: Isn't it especially sad when a longtime reliable favorite begins to slip and then keeps going? Such appears to be the case with Tiffin, the once stalwart Indian take-out specialist. . . . Tiffin hit a new low when we decided to give it one more try via take-out last night. . . . Food was not very hot, and it had even less flavor.
FOOD
June 16, 2016
Makes 4 servings 11/2 pounds tuna steak, cut into small chunks 1 tablespoon red miso paste 1/2 teaspoon prepared wasabi 1 teaspoon soy sauce 4 green onions, white and pale green parts, cut into 1/2-inch pieces For pickled ginger relish: 1/2 cup pickled ginger for sushi, finely chopped Finely chopped zest and juice of 1/2 lemon 3 green onions, white and pale green parts, halved lengthwise and thinly sliced ...
FOOD
January 29, 2016
I'm a sucker for a good can of tuna, and this recipe gives it a slightly sophisticated profile, with greens, eggs, and a bit of Parmesan cheese. It's quick to put together, and so pantry-friendly you might not even have to shop. You do need a jumbo-muffin pan. Tuna Spinach Tortas 4 to 6 servings   10 ounces frozen spinach, preferably in a bag rather than in a block Two 5-ounce cans tuna packed in olive oil 1/4 cup freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese 1/2 cup plain panko (bread crumbs)
FOOD
January 28, 2016
Makes 8-10 servings 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 medium onion, diced 2 carrots, diced 2 stalks of celery, diced 4 cloves garlic, minced 2 oil-packed anchovy fillets 1 teaspoon minced fresh thyme or rosemary 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes 2 zucchini, diced 6 cups chicken broth 4 cups cannellini beans (canned, or dried beans soaked overnight until tender) 1 15-ounce can diced tomatoes 1 head escarole, trimmed, washed, and coarsely chopped 3 cans Italian albacore tuna packed in olive oil, drained Salt, pepper to taste 1. In a large, heavy soup pot, heat olive oil, then add onion, carrots, celery, and garlic, and sauté until tender.
NEWS
February 6, 2015
HAVE YOU heard? Science shows that, contrary to popular thinking, fish is not a vegetable. Many so-called vegetarians harbor that fluid dietary ethic. I include my own 15 years as a so-called vegetarian, when I celebrated the occasional birthday or holiday with shrimp or New England clam chowder because, come on, "It's just seafood!" But serious science has established a couple of other facts. One is that ocean drift nets grab a huge amount of "bycatch" - nontargeted animals that die just the same.
FOOD
October 30, 2014 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
The new commercial kitchen at the Free Library of Philadelphia is, by far, the most beautiful, tricked-out kitchen in which I've ever cooked. We made lovely meals in the simple convent kitchen at St. Martin de Porres in North Philadelphia when the after-school cooking program began in 2012, and then in the public school cafeteria kitchens the following fall and spring. As the program grew over the last two years, with volunteers cooking in schools in Philadelphia and Camden, some classes made feasts with just an electric frying pan. The point is, you don't need a high-end kitchen and fancy equipment to cook a nice dinner.
NEWS
October 5, 2014 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eric Frein is surviving in the woods by eating cans of tuna fish and ramen noodles, police said Friday. But they say they believe his food supply is dwindling, and that with Frein's diminishing resources and the weather beginning to chill, they will soon be able to catch the self-styled survivalist. "I'm more confident than ever that he's stressed," State Police Lt. Col. George Bivens said. "It's only a matter of time. " At a 25-minute news briefing Friday afternoon, Bivens offered few new details on the three-week-old manhunt for Frein, who is accused of killing one state trooper and injuring another in a Sept.
NEWS
September 20, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mementos around her house might have raised intriguing questions about where Marion Flood Kaisla worked. There were the highball glasses with etchings of the StarKist advertising figure Charlie the Tuna. There were bottles of several varieties of Tabasco sauce brought back from the brewing vats on Avery Island, La. And strangely, bottles of experimental forms of Heinz ketchup, colored green and purple. "I thought they were disgusting," Mrs. Kaisla's daughter, Katherine A. Dewechter, said about the ketchup, "but my kids loved them.
NEWS
June 24, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer GreenSpace Columnist
Adam Finkel figures he's lucky. His daughter never really liked tuna to begin with. And she's 13 now, beyond an age where tuna consumption is most worrisome. Her brain is closer to maturity. But based on two recent reports, Finkel, a University of Pennsylvania professor who is also a national expert on human health-risk assessment, fears many of the nation's kids are eating too much tuna - aided and abetted by being offered it at school. Tuna has a lot going for it. It's popular and cheap, loaded with protein and low in fat. And federal health guidelines are simple and direct: We should eat more seafood.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|