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Tunisia

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NEWS
November 8, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Coup leader Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali was sworn in as Tunisia's new president yesterday, only hours after announcing that veteran leader Habib Bourguiba had been removed from office because of senility and other "lingering illness. " Government sources said the decision to remove Bourguiba, 84, the Arab world's longest-serving elected leader, had been made with the support of virtually all ranking members of the government. He had been in power for 31 years. The new president got a standing ovation when he took the oath of office at the National Assembly, praising Bourguiba's past leadership but promising a more democratic future.
NEWS
July 1, 1991 | by Leigh Jackson, Daily News Staff Writer
A convicted cop killer, who escaped 11 years ago to Libya, where he married and taught English, faces extradition back to the United States, according to Bucks County authorities. "This is the first time in the history of this country that a fugitive has been returned through extradition without an extradition treaty," said Bucks County Assistant District Attorney Alan M. Rubenstein. William Patrick Alston, 43, of Tioga Street near 20th, was arrested about two months ago as he tried to enter Tunisia with an invalid passport, Rubenstein said.
NEWS
May 19, 2011 | By Margaret Talev, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - President Obama will use his speech to the Arab world Thursday to call for billions of dollars in financial assistance to Egypt and Tunisia as part of a comprehensive approach to the "Arab Spring" movement that he hopes will boost democratic reforms and America's reputation in the region. The aid package, which would unfold over two to three years, would include an estimated $1 billion in debt cancellation, $1 billion in loan guarantees, and several billion more in financing from multilateral institutions such as the World Bank, according to three senior administration officials who briefed reporters on the condition of anonymity under ground rules set by the White House.
NEWS
April 10, 2012 | By David D. Kirkpatrick
NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE CAIRO - The six-month-old government of Tunisia cracked down with tear gas and batons Monday on thousands of protesters who filled a central artery of the capital in defiance of a new ban on demonstrations there. The confrontation, at the site of the protests that ousted former President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali and kicked off the Arab Spring last year, was another manifestation of a role reversal now playing out across North Africa in the aftermath of the revolts in neighboring Egypt and Libya as well.
NEWS
July 29, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
When leftist opposition leader Mohammed Brahmi was gunned down in front of his family Thursday in Tunis, the impact rippled throughout the region. The assassination shook the only democracy born of the Arab Spring upheavals that is still fully functioning. Given the military crackdown in Egypt, the civil war in Syria, and the instability in Libya and Yemen, the Tunis killing raised a question the 2011 revolts were supposed to have buried: Is democracy suited to the Arab world? Tunisia was supposed to be the poster child for Arab democracy, the country where the self-immolation of a frustrated youth sparked the first (peaceful)
SPORTS
August 1, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON - The U.S. men's Olympic basketball team needed a while but eventually put on the show fans came to see, beating Tunisia, 110-63, Tuesday night. Finally pulling away when coach Mike Krzyzewski started the reserves to open the second half, the Americans had six players in double figures and improved to 2-0 in the tournament. Krzyzewski insists he planned to start the second unit even before a lackluster first half, and said there was nothing bad about the Americans' performance.
NEWS
June 19, 1988 | By Jack Severson, Inquirer Staff Writer
Love Roman ruins but can't afford Rome's $200-a-night hotels? Crazy about Mediterranean resorts but find the prices on the Cote d'Azur beyond your reach? Delight in culinary pursuits but think $80 for lunch in Paris is a bit too much to swallow? Then this North African country may be the place for you this year, a year when the downscaled dollar makes most of Europe accessible only to the near- rich. Tunisia isn't the cheapest place in the world to visit, but this most- Westernized of North African nations certainly isn't expensive when compared with the countries of Western Europe.
NEWS
June 25, 1992 | By Peter Finn, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
To summarize her take on life, 72-year-old Luise Leppert likes to quote another - far less sunny - overachiever. "According to George Bernard Shaw," she said, "it's better to wear out than to rust. " So Leppert, a great-grandmother, is off to Tunisia today with the Peace Corps for "a finale" to her life. "It's one last adventure," said Leppert. "I have butterflies. But here I go. " Leppert, a Ventnor City native who has been staying recently in Medford Lakes, will live in a squat, concrete-block house in a rural community in North Africa, where the wind blows in hot and dry from the Sahara Desert.
NEWS
January 15, 2013
By Moncef Marzouki The futurist Alvin Toffler used to say that when a society reaches a certain degree of development, democracy becomes a technical necessity, not simply an ethical one. But this rule didn't seem to apply to the Arab world. Industrialization failed, "modernity" arrived late due to colonization, and when a democratic wave destroyed dictatorships in Latin America and Eastern Europe, little happened in North Africa and the Middle East. Racists pointed to the wrong cause for this phenomenon, citing the culture.
NEWS
June 25, 2012
Tunisia returns ex-Libyan official TUNIS, Tunisia - Tunisia extradited Libya's former prime minister to his country on Sunday, despite concerns by Tunisia's president and human-rights groups that he could be tortured or unfairly prosecuted there. The decision by Tunisia's prime minister to send Al-Baghdadi Al-Mahmoudi home to face trial appeared to set up a potential clash between the president and prime minister of this North African country, the top two officials in the governing coalition.
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NEWS
January 10, 2016
Stephen W. Bosworth, 76, a three-time U.S. ambassador who helped shepherd the transition to democracy in the Philippines after the decades-long rule of Ferdinand E. Marcos and later sought to defuse the nuclear threat in North Korea, died Monday at his home in Boston. The cause was pancreatic cancer, said his brother Brian Bosworth. At the time of his death, Mr. Bosworth was chairman of the U.S.-Korea Institute at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
November 6, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
As we debate how Tuesday's election results will affect government gridlock, I can't help thinking about two other elections, held last week, in tiny Tunisia and embattled Ukraine. They offer insights to Americans fed up with paralysis in Washington (exit polls showed a majority of U.S. voters were not only dissatisfied with President Obama, but also with both political parties - and with Congress). As Obama and Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell take to the airwaves promising to deliver "results" over the next two years, I suggest they pay attention to what's happening in Tunis and Kiev.
NEWS
February 3, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
For those who think the failures of the Arab Spring prove the Mideast is unsuited to democracy, Jordan's Marwan Muasher begs to differ. A scholar and statesman who's long been a voice for tolerance in the Arab world, Muasher argues - in his important new book, The Second Arab Awakening and the Battle for Pluralism - that it's too soon to judge the outcome of the Arab upheavals that began in 2011. He says: "The Arab world never operated in a culture of democracy, so you can't expect a transformational process in three years.
NEWS
July 29, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
When leftist opposition leader Mohammed Brahmi was gunned down in front of his family Thursday in Tunis, the impact rippled throughout the region. The assassination shook the only democracy born of the Arab Spring upheavals that is still fully functioning. Given the military crackdown in Egypt, the civil war in Syria, and the instability in Libya and Yemen, the Tunis killing raised a question the 2011 revolts were supposed to have buried: Is democracy suited to the Arab world? Tunisia was supposed to be the poster child for Arab democracy, the country where the self-immolation of a frustrated youth sparked the first (peaceful)
FOOD
May 3, 2013 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
The lunch-hour rush is under way at the convoy of food trucks that line Spruce Street near the University of Pennsylvania campus. From inside the cramped Chez Yasmine, Jihed Chehimi is serving gourmet street fare from around the globe - heaping salmon sandwiches sprinkled with caviar, homemade couscous, and cups of Indian red lentil soup - all with a side of conversation that occasionally turns to the science of AIDS. For more than two decades, the Ph.D. in viral immunology was an HIV/AIDS researcher, first at Penn and then at the labs of the Wistar Institute, where the senior scientist explored innate and adaptive immunity.
NEWS
February 22, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Tunisia has done it again. The country that triggered the Arab Spring has produced something unseen during the past two years of upheavals: A politician who holds himself to account. Hamadi Jebali, Tunisia's prime minister, resigned Tuesday in protest at the failure of political leaders, including those of his own Islamist party, Ennahda, to compromise. He was trying to calm the country after the assassination of an opposition leader had sent tens of thousands of Tunisians to the streets in protest at the failure of Ennahda to crack down on religious extremists blamed for that murder and other acts of violence.
NEWS
January 15, 2013
By Moncef Marzouki The futurist Alvin Toffler used to say that when a society reaches a certain degree of development, democracy becomes a technical necessity, not simply an ethical one. But this rule didn't seem to apply to the Arab world. Industrialization failed, "modernity" arrived late due to colonization, and when a democratic wave destroyed dictatorships in Latin America and Eastern Europe, little happened in North Africa and the Middle East. Racists pointed to the wrong cause for this phenomenon, citing the culture.
NEWS
January 9, 2013 | By Bouazza Ben Bouazza and Paul Schemm, Associated Press
TUNIS, Tunisia - Tunisian authorities released one of the only men in custody for alleged links to September's attack on the U.S. diplomatic mission in the Libyan city of Benghazi, the latest blow to an investigation that has limped along for months. Armed groups assaulted the lightly guarded mission on Sept. 11 and killed U.S. Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens and three other Americans, but despite U.S. promises there has been little news of progress so far in bringing the perpetrators to justice.
NEWS
September 16, 2012 | By Karen DeYoung, Washington Post
CAIRO - The Obama administration ordered the evacuation of all but emergency U.S. government personnel, and all family members, from diplomatic missions in Tunisia and Sudan on Saturday and warned Americans not to travel to those countries. The action came as leaders across the Muslim world took stock of their relationship with the United States, a major provider of aid and investment, and struggled to balance it with the simmering anger of their populations. In Sudan, the State Department order came after the government in Khartoum rejected a U.S. request to send a Marine antiterrorism unit to protect the embassy there, which came under attack by protesters Friday.
SPORTS
August 1, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON - The U.S. men's Olympic basketball team needed a while but eventually put on the show fans came to see, beating Tunisia, 110-63, Tuesday night. Finally pulling away when coach Mike Krzyzewski started the reserves to open the second half, the Americans had six players in double figures and improved to 2-0 in the tournament. Krzyzewski insists he planned to start the second unit even before a lackluster first half, and said there was nothing bad about the Americans' performance.
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