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NEWS
September 23, 2011 | By Kim Gamel, Associated Press
TRIPOLI, Libya - Tunisian authorities arrested Moammar Gadhafi's former prime minister Thursday as Libya's new rulers and NATO warned the fugitive leader and his loyalists that they were running out of places to hide. U.S. Ambassador to Libya Gene Cretz said Gadhafi and his loyalists would eventually be routed, and he pledged continued support for the country's new leadership. "The next few months will be critical as Libyans lay the groundwork for a pluralistic democracy that respects the rights of all of its citizens," he said in remarks before the flag was raised in front of his residence in Tripoli.
NEWS
May 23, 2012 | By Bouazza Ben Bouazza, Associated Press
TUNIS, Tunisia - Tunisia said Tuesday that it will soon extradite Al-Baghdadi Al-Mahmoudi back to his homeland, after detaining the former Libyan prime minister for eight months. Mahmoudi was arrested in September for illegally crossing the frontier into Tunisia as he tried to flee to Algeria, where members of former Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi's family had sought refuge. Lawyers and human-rights groups had opposed the extradition, saying Mahmoudi might be harmed by Libya's new ruling authorities - representative of the rebels who overthrew Gadhafi last year.
NEWS
January 9, 2013 | By Bouazza Ben Bouazza and Paul Schemm, Associated Press
TUNIS, Tunisia - Tunisian authorities released one of the only men in custody for alleged links to September's attack on the U.S. diplomatic mission in the Libyan city of Benghazi, the latest blow to an investigation that has limped along for months. Armed groups assaulted the lightly guarded mission on Sept. 11 and killed U.S. Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens and three other Americans, but despite U.S. promises there has been little news of progress so far in bringing the perpetrators to justice.
NEWS
October 6, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Spain was under Islamic rule for seven centuries until 1492, when its Christian leaders forced their Abrahamic cousins to convert or flee the country. Yet, more than 500 years later, Iberian culture still bears a profoundly Islamic and Arab influence. Nowhere is that more evident than in the southern region of Andalusia, which touches North Africa via the Strait of Gibraltar. The region's most famous modern poet, Federico García Lorca (1898-1936), infused his verses with a musical language both Spanish and Arabic.
FOOD
July 5, 2000 | by Kent Steinriede, For the Daily News
Nabil Jomli has had a varied professional life. He trained as an engineer in his native Tunisia, yet became a physical education teacher there. Then, after two years as a front desk clerk in a London hotel, he came to Philadelphia in 1997. The next year he opened a halal butcher shop in the Italian Market. The butcher shop evolved into a Mediterranean take-out restaurant and, most recently, into a pizzeria with a sprinkling of Mediterranean dishes on the menu. However, one thing has been constant since Jomli, 33, opened his first business on 9th Street: savory, slightly spicy merguez sausage.
NEWS
January 29, 1989 | By Frank Greve, Inquirer Washington Bureau
When relatives first suggested that he hire commandos to rescue his daughter and granddaughter trapped in Tunisia in a bitter custody dispute, GM autoworker Bill Swint winced. "Life is not a Rambo movie," he said. Days later, the Swints hired former U.S. Army Delta Force commandos to snatch their kin from a windy Mediterranean beach - and sold movie rights to their incredible $80,000 covert action to the Rambo films' producers. Today, Laurie Swint-Ghidaoui and her dark-eyed daughter, Leila, 2, are back in Lansing.
NEWS
December 1, 2014 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Until I read Carol Solomon's introduction to the catalog for "Memory, Place, Desire: Contemporary Art of the Maghreb and Maghrebi Diaspora," I'd been under the impression that the area of North Africa known as the Mahgreb was Morocco. In fact, as visiting professor Solomon - who organized the exhibition of contemporary art from that region for Haverford College's Cantor Fitzgerald Gallery, - explains in much greater detail, the Maghreb comprises most of North Africa west of Egypt and is sometimes said to include Egypt.
NEWS
November 1, 2011
Tunisian warrant for Arafat widow TUNIS, Tunisia - Tunisia has issued a warrant summoning the widow of deceased Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat over a corruption scandal, the state news agency reported Monday. The warrant was issued last week over Suha Arafat's role in a scandal involving former Tunisian dictator Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, his family, and other high government officials, said a spokesman for the Justice Ministry. She was being investigated over the International School of Carthage, which she founded in 2006 with Ben Ali's wife, Leila Trabelsi, the agency reported.
NEWS
June 19, 1988 | By Linda Henry, Special to The Inquirer
As we wandered through the knee-high grass of the ruins of Makhtar, an ancient Roman town in central Tunisia, I shivered in the evening wind; I had not expected this chill on an April evening in North Africa. I waded through the jade-green growth and sat on the cool marble walls, remains of a city that died 1,500 years ago. Dozens of deep-purple irises danced among the walls and aisles of the ancient Byzantine mausoleum, where the third-century inhabitants of Makhtar had buried their dead.
NEWS
February 4, 1993 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sol E. Zubrow, 74, a management consultant who completed studies that touched prickly government issues for the administration of Gov. Milton Shapp, died Sunday at his home in Center City. The two met in 1960 when Mr. Zubrow tried to interest Shapp in an international marketing scheme for Tunisian olive oil. Shapp turned him down but was so impressed that he called on Mr. Zubrow often after Shapp became governor. Mr. Zubrow was consulted so often that he was sometimes called Shapp's "hot potatoes man," said Mr. Zubrow's son, Barry.
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NEWS
December 1, 2014 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Until I read Carol Solomon's introduction to the catalog for "Memory, Place, Desire: Contemporary Art of the Maghreb and Maghrebi Diaspora," I'd been under the impression that the area of North Africa known as the Mahgreb was Morocco. In fact, as visiting professor Solomon - who organized the exhibition of contemporary art from that region for Haverford College's Cantor Fitzgerald Gallery, - explains in much greater detail, the Maghreb comprises most of North Africa west of Egypt and is sometimes said to include Egypt.
NEWS
October 6, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Spain was under Islamic rule for seven centuries until 1492, when its Christian leaders forced their Abrahamic cousins to convert or flee the country. Yet, more than 500 years later, Iberian culture still bears a profoundly Islamic and Arab influence. Nowhere is that more evident than in the southern region of Andalusia, which touches North Africa via the Strait of Gibraltar. The region's most famous modern poet, Federico García Lorca (1898-1936), infused his verses with a musical language both Spanish and Arabic.
NEWS
July 28, 2013
Memorial for derail victims LAC-MEGANTIC, Quebec - An overflow crowd attended a memorial service Saturday for the 47 people who were killed when a runaway oil train derailed and exploded. About 1,000 people packed St. Agnes Church for the morning Mass presided over by Luc Cyr, the archbishop of Sherbrooke. Among the dignitaries attending was Prime Minister Stephen Harper and the town's mayor, Colette Roy-Laroche. Maine Gov. Paul LePage also was on hand to offer his condolences. The service came three weeks after a runaway train carrying 72 carloads of crude oil hurtled down an incline, derailed, and slammed into downtown Lac-Megantic.
NEWS
February 8, 2013 | By Abigail Hauslohner, Washington Post
CAIRO - Tunisia's ruling Islamist party rejected Prime Minister Hamadi Jebali's offer to dissolve the government Thursday, a day after the assassination of an opposition leader sent waves of anger rippling through the North African country and left the government scrambling to contain the fallout. The challenge put forward by the moderate Islamist Ennahda party has amplified the potential for a political crisis in Tunisia. Chokri Belaid, a leader of the leftist Popular Front alliance and an outspoken critic of Tunisia's government, was shot dead outside his home Wednesday, a day after he received the latest in a string of death threats and called for a national conference on political violence.
NEWS
January 9, 2013 | By Bouazza Ben Bouazza and Paul Schemm, Associated Press
TUNIS, Tunisia - Tunisian authorities released one of the only men in custody for alleged links to September's attack on the U.S. diplomatic mission in the Libyan city of Benghazi, the latest blow to an investigation that has limped along for months. Armed groups assaulted the lightly guarded mission on Sept. 11 and killed U.S. Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens and three other Americans, but despite U.S. promises there has been little news of progress so far in bringing the perpetrators to justice.
NEWS
June 4, 2012 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
DOHA, Qatar — As the Arab Spring morphs into a hot Arab summer, activists around the region are debating whether Islamist parties and democracy can mix. Given the triumph of religious parties in parliamentary elections in Tunisia and Egypt, and the lead roles taken by Islamists in Libya, Yemen, and the Syrian opposition, Arab human rights activists have become increasingly nervous that their revolution will be hijacked. Nowhere is that debate more intense than in Egypt, where the Muslim Brotherhood's candidate is one of two finalists in presidential elections set for June 15 and 16. The Brotherhood already won 47 percent of the parliamentary seats in November; its success stems from its tight organization and loyal core of supporters.
NEWS
May 23, 2012 | By Bouazza Ben Bouazza, Associated Press
TUNIS, Tunisia - Tunisia said Tuesday that it will soon extradite Al-Baghdadi Al-Mahmoudi back to his homeland, after detaining the former Libyan prime minister for eight months. Mahmoudi was arrested in September for illegally crossing the frontier into Tunisia as he tried to flee to Algeria, where members of former Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi's family had sought refuge. Lawyers and human-rights groups had opposed the extradition, saying Mahmoudi might be harmed by Libya's new ruling authorities - representative of the rebels who overthrew Gadhafi last year.
NEWS
December 14, 2011 | By Bouazza Ben Bouazza, Associated Press
TUNIS, Tunisia - Tunisia's newly elected president promised Tuesday at his swearing-in to be a leader for all Tunisians. Veteran rights activist Moncef Marzouki, who was repeatedly imprisoned by the old regime, said he would make a clean break with Tunisia's history of dictatorship and promised Tunisians the right to education, work, and health care, and equal rights to all women. Tunisians overthrew their long-ruling dictator in January, sparking a wave of pro-democracy demonstrations across the region.
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