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Tunnel Vision

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NEWS
August 30, 2002
WELCOME back to our regular exercise in sheepishness as we recall our past wrongheaded opinions. Today's Daily News Regret goes back to 1977, when we ridiculed the proposed $400 million commuter rail tunnel to connect the Penn Central line, which dead-ended at Suburban Station, with that of the Reading Railroad, which ended at 10th and Market. Using the headline "Digging a Hole" ( more than once), the Daily News editorialized (more than once) that the tunnel was an overpriced boondoggle being pushed by then-Mayor Frank Rizzo because he "worships at the altar of the construction unions.
NEWS
October 3, 1996 | BY RABBI ARTHUR WASKOW
During this week, Jews are celebrating Sukkot, the harvest festival, with a strange booth - a hut with open sides and a leafy, leaky roof - open enough to see the stars, open enough for rain or a robber to enter. If it is built to be invulnerable, it is no longer kosher. Yet in the evening prayers, we ask God to "spread over us the sukkah of Your peace. " Why is this vulnerable house the home of peace? Because only when we all publicly acknowledge how vulnerable we are can we make peace with each other.
NEWS
October 16, 2010
If Gov. Christie's intent with his stunning decision to derail the new rail tunnel linking New Jersey and Manhattan is to run a high-stakes poker bluff with the federal government over funding the costly project, then good luck to him. But if the governor's hold-out position is to scuttle the trans-Hudson River tunnel, then he's apparently intent on making his biggest policy blunder yet. The multibillion-dollar tunnel will be vitally important...
NEWS
August 21, 1995 | By Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
Like all cities, Philadelphia is honeycombed with hidden spaces and forgotten places. This is the first of two articles aimed at revealing some of those hidden spots that few people have ever seen: FRANKLIN INSTITUTE TUNNEL: Deep in the basement of the Franklin Institute is a 250-foot-long empty tunnel that runs under Race Street. It once connected the science museum with the Franklin Institute Research Laboratories building. At one time, the Franklin Institute was active in scientific research for government and private industry.
NEWS
July 3, 1986 | By Sydney J. Harris
A lady I knew slightly, and admired, died not long ago, and I learned from her obituary that she had received the highest scholastic record in her college's history - but failed to make Phi Beta Kappa because she never learned to dive and got low grades in physical education. This mention took me back to my days as a member of Troop 4, Beaver Patrol, in the Boy Scouts of America, when my ultimate ambition was to become an Eagle Scout, the highest rank in scouting. Alas, I was never able to make it, for although I had many more merit badges than were required, I could never pass the life saving test, which was a requisite for the rank.
NEWS
April 14, 1995 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
Nick Cassizzi, 51, is Port Richmond born and bred. So is 27-year-old Rob Giannini. And though they're a generation apart, they have one thing very much in common. Tunnels! "Dark, dirty, dingy, derelict" tunnels. If you're from Port Richmond - or just visiting - it's hard to live without them. They're a way of life. A "gateway" to different places, different faces. Cassizzi and Giannini point out that it's nearly impossible to get into or out of Port Richmond without passing through a tunnel.
NEWS
June 23, 1993 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
It was a huge public-works project in the heart of Center City - the most expensive in the city's history. There were years of fierce politicking and posturing before the first spade of earth was turned. "Boondoggle!" screamed the opponents, mostly community advocates who said the project ignored and even defied the needs of the neighborhoods. "Jobs!" bellowed the advocates, who saw millions of dollars flowing to construction workers. The disruptive construction work seemed endless.
NEWS
January 24, 2002 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
About 12,200 cars a day are traveling through the much-ballyhooed tunnel that connects the Atlantic City Expressway with the city's marina section - a figure officials hope will grow once a new casino opens at one end. The tunnel is part of a 2.5-mile road built at a cost of $330 million, two-thirds of which was paid with state money. The rest was financed by the MGM Mirage casino company. Officials at the South Jersey Transportation Authority estimated that 23,000 cars a day are using some portion of the roadway, including the tunnel, in either direction.
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SPORTS
November 11, 2012 | By Vinny Vella, vvella@philly.com
"Just be goofy. No one can see you. " With those words of advice from La Salle sophomore Keala Evans - my appointed mascot handler - I got inside the La Salle Explorer's grinning and comically oversize head last weekend to see what it's like to be a Big 5 mascot. The Explorer, nemesis of the Saint Joseph's Hawk, the Villanova Wildcat, the Temple Owl and the Penn Quaker, is a wide-eyed swashbuckler who pumps up the crowd at my alma mater during basketball season at the Tom Gola Arena in Olney.
NEWS
September 12, 2011
Philadelphia police shot and critically injured a 38-year-old man who they say brandished a gun early Sunday as a crowd gathered in the 3200 block of Mercer Street in Port Richmond. Alfred Cruttenden, of the 2800 block of Gillingham Street, was shot in the stomach and a leg after he arrived in a vehicle, drew a revolver from his waistband, and waved it at the crowd, police spokesman Lt. Ray Evers said. He said Cruttenden ignored demands from 24th District officers to drop the gun. "I guess he had such tunnel vision he didn't see the police," Evers said.
NEWS
February 13, 2011
Last year, heedless as usual of the status quo and good manners, Gov. Christie single-handedly smashed to bits one of the nation's biggest public-works projects, a long-planned rail tunnel between North Jersey and Manhattan. Last week, scrambling to pick up the bits, Amtrak and New Jersey's U.S. senators, Bob Menendez and Frank Lautenberg, announced a new project with much the same goal. Christie's response? Mission accomplished. By refusing to help solve the mass-transit logjam, he had forced others to deal with it. (Presumably, the governor's next step will be to get the economy and illegal immigration fixed by refusing to do anything about them, either.
SPORTS
April 8, 2010
WASHINGTON - With all due respect to the people who believe life begins on Opening Day, they are wrong. It really begins just after that, the next game after that, when the ceremonial first pitch isn't being thrown by the president and many more of the seats are empty and the atmosphere is less celebratory and more ordinary. This is when real life begins in baseball, real work, the relentless grind. It is, appropriately enough, the day Cole Hamels started his first game of 2010.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2008 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
IT'S ONE THING when a new Calvin Klein underwear ad in Times Square gets the decency folks riled up, but the London subway system has a bigger problem than Klein, Abercrombie or Victoria's Secret. Lucas Cranach the Elder. London's transport authority has refused to display a poster featuring Cranach's "Venus," saying it is overtly sexual. "Venus" was painted in 1532. But she's still hot. In London, it seems, 470 is the new 30. The painting, which depicts a golden-haired, milky-skinned woman cocking her hips behind a transparent veil, is one of 70 works due to go on display at London's Royal Academy of Arts on March 8. But Transport for London refused to display a poster of the work unless the bottom half was cropped out, the academy said.
NEWS
July 31, 2007
EIGHTY-five rounds fired, 20 hits on target and one big excuse from the police. As long as we have police like Sgt. Brian King (letters, "A cop's-eye view of shooting," July 30), there will be no improvement in the Police Department. Police are supposed to be trained professionals. They aren't supposed to get "tunnel vision. " The public has a right to ask for police who hit what they are aiming at and don't panic at the sound of gunfire. The sergeant makes no mention of the 65 rounds that were fired into a community that didn't do anything wrong.
SPORTS
September 2, 2006 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Amos Alonzo Stagg. More than seven decades after the University of Chicago's retirement guidelines forced him to step down, the legendary coach is remembered as a football Methuselah, a wrinkled, white-haired man who seemingly patrolled the sidelines forever. Stagg was 70 and had coached 41 seasons when he left after the 1932 season. Surely, sportswriters noted at the time, no one would ever coach so long at one institution again. But when he runs onto the Beaver Stadium turf this afternoon for Penn State's season opener against Akron, 79-year-old Joe Paterno will have caught up to the Grand Old Man of the Midway.
SPORTS
April 20, 2006 | By Rob Parent INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shortly after the announcement yesterday that he would be the Flyers' starting goalie in the playoffs, Robert Esche didn't hesitate to say that his "Silent Bob" act of two years ago was officially a postseason production of the past. Esche, the starter the last time the Flyers entered the NHL's spring tournament, in 2004, was outstanding. He was 11-7 with a 2.32 goals-against average as the Flyers went seven games deep into the Eastern Conference finals. He also largely kept his mouth shut, speaking only after games in a reversal of his naked-truth norm for interviews.
NEWS
February 14, 2006 | By Janice Hatfield Young
While most holidays come wrapped in cheery traditions, peek inside the festive packaging and you may discover a black box of expectations that often undermine the day's enjoyment. Valentine's Day, a fairly frivolous celebration, is truly a holiday of Great Expectations. As Pip discovered in Dickens' novel, one's expectations in love and fortune are often met with disappointment, and so it goes for both the beloved and the lovelorn every Feb. 14. It all starts in childhood, of course.
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