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Turf War

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NEWS
August 15, 2001
SURE, IT'S embarrassing, but not nearly as embarrassing as it would have been if a player had been seriously injured on the new turf at Veterans Stadium. Canceling the Eagles-Ravens pre-season game was not only the right thing to do - it was the only thing. What's more, until everyone is sure it's safe to play football there, it shouldn't be played - no matter how much it costs the Eagles. They'll probably just deduct it from their share of building the new stadium anyway, adding to how much the taxpayers are already shelling out. The Vet itself is a huge embarrassment.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1995 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Sonatine, starring Takeshi "Beat" Kitano and written and directed by him, is a rivetingly weird existential gangster picture. Although the story line - about a world-weary crime boss called in to settle a turf war in Okinawa - is your standard gangland scenario of duplicity and betrayal, there's nothing standard about Kitano's approach. Often keeping his camera in a fixed position, Kitano creates a mood of unsettling tranquillity, and so the violence, when it comes, is doubly alarming for the matter-of-fact manner in which it's recorded.
SPORTS
January 21, 1998 | by Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer
Drexel's basketball team walked three blocks last January - for the first time in nearly seven decades - to play a regular-season game against Penn at the Palestra. The walk back was even better, following the Dragons' six-point victory. Last night, they again headed down 33rd Street. This time, the return trip probably seemed more like three miles. Or, as an exasperated coach Bill Herrion put it, "I might just walk home tonight. " The Quakers, who wore their blue road jerseys at home for probably the first time since the Big 5 stopped playing a full, "neutral-court" round-robin in the mid-1980s, won their third straight, 79-65.
SPORTS
August 21, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
The Houston Oilers may be trying to turn a bump in the carpet into a reason to run to Nashville, Tenn., but landlords at the Astrodome won't be shaken so easily. Astrodome USA owner Drayton McLane insisted yesterday that the field was playable the night before when the exhibition game between the Oilers and San Diego Chargers was canceled by NFL officials because of problems with the Astrodome's artificial surface. The decision to cancel the game added another twist in the animosity between the Oilers and Astrodome USA, the parent company of the Houston Astros and manager of stadium.
NEWS
July 24, 1995 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
There were no winners after a "turf war" outside of a Southwest Philadelphia house following a high-school graduation party last month. Only losers. Caliph Campbell, 19, of Saturn Place, lost his life when he was shot in the head on Buist Avenue near 78th Street. His friend, Louis Stratton, 19, who lived a block away, almost lost his left foot, where he was shot and wounded. Michael Cooper, 24, of Sharon Hill, Delaware County, lost his freedom after the incident, shortly after midnight June 17. Cooper is charged with murder and aggravated assault, said Assistant District Attorney Edward McCann.
NEWS
May 26, 1989 | By S.A. Paolantonio, Inquirer Staff Writer
After spending months crisscrossing New Jersey to broaden their appeal and committing more than $6 million to television imagery, the Republican contestants for governor are still locked in nothing more than an elaborate turf war, campaign officials and analysts said yesterday. With 11 days to go before the June 6 primary, the GOP race is pretty much where it began in January - a battle to determine which geographic base will prevail. But some Republican leaders contend there is one glaring exception: In the span of five months, Cary Edwards of Bergen County has come from virtually nowhere to become a serious contender for the GOP nomination, if his financial resources can hold out for the next two weeks.
NEWS
April 22, 2001 | By Angela Valdez INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Grass. Usually, it's the most mundane vegetation. Not in this city. Here, it is at the crux of a debate over the line that separates favoritism from generosity. At issue is whether the city should mow the grass, free of charge, at a private, nonprofit retirement home with ties to the wives of city officials. For at least 20 years, from May to November, municipal workers have made trips twice a month to cut the grass at the Home for Aged Women at 241 York St. Though city officials defend the gratis service, some residents say it's a violation of the public trust.
NEWS
December 2, 1992 | by Yvonne Latty, Daily News Staff Writer
William Mungin is a follower. Whatever his friends do, he wants to do, and wherever they go, he wants to go, his grandmother said yesterday. On Tuesday, police said, Mungin, 14, pulled out a sawed-off shotgun at lunchtime in the crowded South Philadelphia High School cafeteria and handed it to Raheem Smith, 15, who shot a 17-year-old student in the leg. Calvin Saunders, of Sigel Street near 21st, was taken to Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, where he is in stable condition.
NEWS
January 30, 1994 | By Nancy Lawson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For two years, the turf war threatened to divide families and turn friends into enemies, but finally, the leaders of each side shut themselves up in a basement room until they came to an agreement. And when it was over last week, Paoli Fire Chief Tommy Robinson and Berwyn Fire President Vincent DiMartini had decided how their two volunteer companies would split up the area in and around Tredyffrin Township's sprawling Chesterbrook development, which has more than 2,400 homes and businesses.
NEWS
June 30, 1994 | By Maureen Graham, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A turf war on the streets of Camden between veteran gang members and an insurgent group has become the focus of a probe by Camden investigators into last weekend's triple slaying. Police also said yesterday they were looking for three men in connection with the deaths of city residents Dwight Chestnut, 19, Robert Bumpers, 20, and Jerome Greene, 17. They declined further comment on that aspect of their investigations. The victims were shot with high-powered weapons, authorities said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 5, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
WHEN Kerlis Moncion and her family were looking to move to a bigger house in 2007, they settled on a home in Lawndale, on a quiet, residential street called Martins Mill Road. The area had everything Moncion was looking for: a Shop-Rite at the end of her street, friendly, helpful neighbors, a nearby bus stop for easy access to other parts of the city. Then, she started to notice some changes. She heard stories about muggings in the surrounding area. During the closing months of last year, her husband's trailer was stolen out of their back yard.
NEWS
July 22, 2011
THE ARMED Somali thugs pledge their allegiance to different warlords now from those they did when I was there to witness the famine of 1992. But the colors of their battle flags don't matter much to the thousands of Somalis who are dying daily of starvation, dehydration and the ravages of a turf war that has divided a lawless and famine-plagued nation into combat zones. It is a famine. The U.N. made that official this week when it noted that a "food crisis" had reached level five on the U.N.'s Integrated Phase Classification system.
BUSINESS
June 30, 2011 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Stand aside, dot-com, king of the Web's early years. The realm of top-level domains, fiefdoms that also include dot-net, dot-edu, dot-org, and dot-gov, is about to get much more populous. The dramatic rise in the number of new fiefdoms won't begin until 2013. But as the landscape starts to take shape in the coming months, you can expect some fascinating battles for brand-new turf - potentially valuable property created from whole cloth by the nonprofit corporation that oversees the Internet's naming system.
NEWS
March 27, 2010 | By David O'Reilly and Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
For 19 years Warren Harrison grew potatoes, beans, corn, and tomatoes in the community garden across West Venango Street from his home. "I had the biggest spot over there," Harrison, 83, recalled recently. Then in June 2008, the bulldozers arrived. Next came the concrete mixers, carpenters, plumbers, and electricians. By fall, seven rowhouses had sprouted where 20 vegetable patches once stood. "I didn't know anything about this," Harrison said. Now, when summer comes, he just grows "four rows of collard greens on my front lawn.
SPORTS
February 28, 2010 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The weatherman on CHEK-TV Vancouver was poised yesterday morning in front of a map that displayed today?s forecast. Little rain clouds hovered over the city, and there was snow up in Whistler. ?But you know what?? said meteorologist Ed Bain, wearing a red Team Canada jersey beneath his blazer. ?None of this matters. Because everyone is going to be inside watching the hockey game.? This afternoon?s gold-medal hockey matchup between the United States and Canada, an apt athletic conclusion to a 2010 Winter Olympics in which North America has starred, almost certainly will be the most-watched hockey game ever.
SPORTS
February 28, 2010 | By Phil Sheridan, Inquirer Columnist
VANCOUVER - The photo helps Bobby Ryan keep things in perspective. He is about to play in the biggest hockey game of his life. The man in the photo, Sgt. Austin Johnson, nearly lost his life in an explosion in Afghanistan. "I got a letter from him the other day," Ryan, the Cherry Hill-bred forward for Team USA, said on the eve of today's Hockey Apocalypse. "It's good to know he's doing better. " There is just something about Team Right Stuff, the U.S. men's squad that will try to ruin Canada's Olympics this afternoon.
NEWS
March 19, 2008 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The newest generation of artificial turf comes with a cushion of recycled tire crumbs and, in some cases, a thick layer of contention. Industry representatives say the turf - in place at dozens of fields throughout the Philadelphia area - is safe. But some parents are not convinced and have mobilized against it. In Burlington County, Evesham Township residents last week turned in more than 2,500 signatures aimed at forcing a referendum that would keep synthetic grass off their recreational fields.
NEWS
January 27, 2008 | By Mari A. Schaefer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A reputed Philadelphia gang leader believed responsible for two shootings last year has been arrested by the Police Department's Major Crimes Unit. Tyrik Upchurch, 20, was picked up without incident by police near 26th and Manton Streets and charged with numerous counts of attempted murder, assault, retaliation against a witness, terroristic threats and related offenses. Bail was set at $2.2 million. Police called Upchurch the "known leader" of the 27th and Dickinson Street gang in the Grays Ferry area and said they believed he was responsible for two shootings last year.
BUSINESS
December 22, 2006 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Could it be a turf war? Artificial turf, that is. Shareholders of a Wayne company formed two years ago to acquire a business - any business - in North America rejected proposals yesterday by management to acquire Sprinturf, a developer and installer of synthetic turf for athletic fields. The acquiring company, Millstream II Acquisition Corp., raised $27.6 million in its initial public offering stock sale in December 2004 - and was trying to find a business "with significant growth potential" in which to invest that money, according to a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
NEWS
November 6, 2006 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They call themselves the Lemon Crew, the Scorpions, Tiny Rascals and 60 Lansdowne Crips, and there are dozens of others, laying claim to blocks and neighborhoods across the city. They are Philadelphia's gangs, and some are extraordinarily violent, contributing to the surge in shootings and murders engulfing the city. While officials debate the scope of the situation or even the definition of a gang, U.S. Attorney Patrick Meehan is certain. "There is a gang problem," Meehan said.
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