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Turkey Dinner

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FOOD
November 20, 2015 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Thanksgiving can be predictable when it comes to the drinks. Pinot noir. Zinfandel. All-American choices. But as a nod to this year's Italian American-theme menu from chef Joe Cicala, we've decided to suggest a splash of Italian flavors, too. For example, why not loosen up the aunts and uncles with a cocktail made to echo some of the same amaro flavors they'll be tasting in that bird (due to the herbal liqueur used in the brine)? For this two-drink recipe for a "Manhattan all'Ascolana," blend six ounces of good old American Bulleit rye with two ounces of Meletti amaro and two dashes of bitters; shake well with ice, strain, and serve in two chilled martini glasses with Amarena cherries for your favorite relatives.
NEWS
November 19, 1999 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Gene Epstein had a bad cold last year on the day of his annual turkey-dinner giveaway at Temple Shalom, but he went to the Levittown synagogue anyway, just to keep an eye on things. Later that day, he went to the hospital with a 104-degree temperature. "It turns out I had bacterial pneumonia," Epstein said. "I almost died. " It's tough to keep Epstein, a Wrightstown resident, away from the pet project he started in 1983 to aid people on welfare or Social Security disability at Thanksgiving.
NEWS
December 25, 1996 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / JOHN COSTELLO
After receiving a turkey dinner, Lillian Black (right), 85, hugs Tanya Hall, an assistant general manager at Penn Tower Hotel, as hotel security guard Hameen Nuridden smiles. Penn Tower employees delivered about a dozen dinners yesterday to residents of a seniors-only housing complex on North 50th Street.
NEWS
February 26, 2016 | By Dana DiFilippo, Staff Writer
A financial adviser has been charged in the death of a Philadelphia woman whose body was found dumped on a central Pennsylvania road on Valentine's Day, police said. Robert Moir, 59, allegedly told police that after spending several nights with Corrine Pena, 35, he awoke one night to find her dead in his bathroom from an apparent drug overdose. He then carted her corpse in his Mercedes-Benz to a snowy, secluded road in Centre County, where he dumped it and wrote authorities an anonymous letter to help them identify the body, according to an affidavit filed in the case.
NEWS
March 26, 1992 | By Howard Altman, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Want to see former Pennsauken Mayor Geraldine Tabako model a bathing suit? Or see Pennsauken Human Rights Commission chairman Eliud Gautier wearing turn- of-the-century tails? All while eating a traditional American turkey dinner? Then come to the Woodbine Inn Sunday at 1 p.m. for the Pennsauken Centennial Fashion Show, where local residents will show off dresses, suits and other clothing based on designs dating back to 1892, when Pennsauken was incorporated. "We felt this would be a good way to celebrate the centennial," said Eileen Fuzer, who helped create the event.
NEWS
November 24, 2006 | By Nancy Petersen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rosemari and Chester Hicks had a surprise in store for their Thanksgiving guests - a home-cooked turkey dinner with all the trimmings. At least that's the story the couple - who have never cooked a Thanksgiving dinner in their lives, and didn't plan on starting yesterday - intended to tell them. In truth, the dinner came from the Cherry Hill Wegmans supermarket. "I don't know how to cook," confessed Rosemari. Her husband doesn't cook either. "We hired friends to cook for us two years ago," said Chester.
NEWS
December 15, 2013 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
BENSALEM Eighth grader Nicholas Pizzo used to visit his grandmother regularly in a nursing home. He described the facility as a "dull and dreary" place. "You could tell they weren't happy to be there," Pizzo, 13, of Bensalem, said of the residents. So when the St. Charles Borromeo School student sat down to write a Christmas card to an elderly woman he'd never met, he could kind of relate to her situation. "God is watching over you," Pizzo wrote to the woman, living in a facility away from home and family.
NEWS
February 5, 2016 | By John N. McGuire, Staff Writer
In all the years Gene Costill was an elected official in Clayton, including five terms as mayor in the 1960s and '70s, he had a model, he said - his grandfather Elwood Costill, the little Gloucester County borough's second mayor. Elwood Costill, a lawyer who was a Union soldier during the Civil War, helped found the borough in 1887. "All my life, I've looked back at what he did and how he was able to accomplish what he did, and I figured, 'Well, I've got to do something,' " he said.
FOOD
November 15, 2012 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Greg Vernick has opened restaurants from Vancouver to Qatar for superstar chef Jean Georges Vongerichten. And while cooking at that French chef's Manhattan namesake on Columbus Circle, along the route of the Thanksgiving Day parade, he routinely roasted 50 turkeys on that holiday. But when we asked Vernick to create a menu for a home-cooked Thanksgiving, the chef took inspiration from the annual turkey dinner his mother made when he was growing up in Cherry Hill. "It was always a great day with family and friends and simple, home-style cooking from Mom," said Vernick, 31, who moved back to the area last summer with his wife, Julie, to open Vernick Food and Drink near Rittenhouse Square.
FOOD
June 19, 1991 | by Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: Can you tell me how to remove a shiny spot from each of the knees of my good wool pants? They're not stains, just shiny spots on each knee. - E.P. Dear E.P.: Try this: Sponge the spots with warm white vinegar, then cover with a damp cloth and press with a warm iron. Allow the fabric to dry completely, then brush gently with a soft brush. This should raise the nap of the fabric so the shine disappears. This is just one of the handy household uses of vinegar. Did you know that you can practically clean your whole house with just two kitchen staples - baking soda and vinegar?
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NEWS
February 26, 2016 | By Dana DiFilippo, Staff Writer
A financial adviser has been charged in the death of a Philadelphia woman whose body was found dumped on a central Pennsylvania road on Valentine's Day, police said. Robert Moir, 59, allegedly told police that after spending several nights with Corrine Pena, 35, he awoke one night to find her dead in his bathroom from an apparent drug overdose. He then carted her corpse in his Mercedes-Benz to a snowy, secluded road in Centre County, where he dumped it and wrote authorities an anonymous letter to help them identify the body, according to an affidavit filed in the case.
NEWS
February 5, 2016 | By John N. McGuire, Staff Writer
In all the years Gene Costill was an elected official in Clayton, including five terms as mayor in the 1960s and '70s, he had a model, he said - his grandfather Elwood Costill, the little Gloucester County borough's second mayor. Elwood Costill, a lawyer who was a Union soldier during the Civil War, helped found the borough in 1887. "All my life, I've looked back at what he did and how he was able to accomplish what he did, and I figured, 'Well, I've got to do something,' " he said.
FOOD
November 20, 2015 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Thanksgiving can be predictable when it comes to the drinks. Pinot noir. Zinfandel. All-American choices. But as a nod to this year's Italian American-theme menu from chef Joe Cicala, we've decided to suggest a splash of Italian flavors, too. For example, why not loosen up the aunts and uncles with a cocktail made to echo some of the same amaro flavors they'll be tasting in that bird (due to the herbal liqueur used in the brine)? For this two-drink recipe for a "Manhattan all'Ascolana," blend six ounces of good old American Bulleit rye with two ounces of Meletti amaro and two dashes of bitters; shake well with ice, strain, and serve in two chilled martini glasses with Amarena cherries for your favorite relatives.
NEWS
December 15, 2013 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
BENSALEM Eighth grader Nicholas Pizzo used to visit his grandmother regularly in a nursing home. He described the facility as a "dull and dreary" place. "You could tell they weren't happy to be there," Pizzo, 13, of Bensalem, said of the residents. So when the St. Charles Borromeo School student sat down to write a Christmas card to an elderly woman he'd never met, he could kind of relate to her situation. "God is watching over you," Pizzo wrote to the woman, living in a facility away from home and family.
NEWS
November 23, 2012 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
For people grieving the death of a loved one, holidays can be more stressful than festive. "Some find comfort in the traditions, but others just can't celebrate," says Joanna Donati, a bereavement counselor with Samaritan Healthcare and Hospice in Marlton. "It helps to realize they're not alone. " With that in mind, her agency is among those in South Jersey offering memorial observances or support groups to help people in mourning navigate this tricky time of year. One of Donati's clients, Blackwood resident Geri Fanelli, lost her younger brother, Mario, to cancer on Nov. 1. He would have been 62 Thursday.
FOOD
November 21, 2012 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
For most families, there's no messing with the Thanksgiving menu. Even the most adventurous cooks cannot part ways with tradition on this holiday. You might be able to jazz things up, but there's no escaping the requisite parts: roasted turkey, mashed potatoes, cranberries, stuffing, and sweet potatoes. But the day after is another story. And with those most basic of building blocks, some of our talented local chefs put together some pretty inventive and tasty sandwiches with the leftovers.
FOOD
November 15, 2012 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Greg Vernick has opened restaurants from Vancouver to Qatar for superstar chef Jean Georges Vongerichten. And while cooking at that French chef's Manhattan namesake on Columbus Circle, along the route of the Thanksgiving Day parade, he routinely roasted 50 turkeys on that holiday. But when we asked Vernick to create a menu for a home-cooked Thanksgiving, the chef took inspiration from the annual turkey dinner his mother made when he was growing up in Cherry Hill. "It was always a great day with family and friends and simple, home-style cooking from Mom," said Vernick, 31, who moved back to the area last summer with his wife, Julie, to open Vernick Food and Drink near Rittenhouse Square.
NEWS
November 24, 2011 | By Maya Rao, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Aidan McManus' passion for helping the needy began with a question: "Mommy, why is there a man out there with a pillow?" Aidan, then 5, had been driving through Philadelphia with his mother, Michelle, when he spied the man on the street. He's homeless, she explained. That's when the Burlington Township boy vowed that no one else should suffer the same hardship. "Not if I had anything to say about it," recalled Aidan, now an 8-year-old third grader at the Doane Academy in Burlington City.
NEWS
November 24, 2006 | By Nancy Petersen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rosemari and Chester Hicks had a surprise in store for their Thanksgiving guests - a home-cooked turkey dinner with all the trimmings. At least that's the story the couple - who have never cooked a Thanksgiving dinner in their lives, and didn't plan on starting yesterday - intended to tell them. In truth, the dinner came from the Cherry Hill Wegmans supermarket. "I don't know how to cook," confessed Rosemari. Her husband doesn't cook either. "We hired friends to cook for us two years ago," said Chester.
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