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Turkey Vultures

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NEWS
July 18, 2000 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Debbie Wamstall showed up because she likes horror movies, and nothing can top the real thing. Andrew Hiles came because he is 6. Although the bug and snake walks had been swell, the chance to see real bones, dead bodies and other gory stuff was irresistible. And Gay Overdevest? She was the instigator, leading what has to be the oddest nature walk in the area - a search for turkey vultures, those eaters of the dead and decomposing. "You guys," she told her audience approvingly, "have to be as morbid and gross as I am. " Most nature walks focus on the planet's prettier side - butterflies, wildflowers, songbirds.
NEWS
January 3, 1991 | By Mary Jane Fine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like the residents who chose Orchard Hills for its tall trees, its sweeping lawns, its near-rural solitude, turkey vultures also value their privacy. Perhaps, then, it shouldn't be surprising that a flock of them once again has made the upscale, suburban subdivision its winter roost. Still, pride of place doesn't quite explain the presence of buzzards in residential Upper Providence, Delaware County. "In my experience it's unusual for them to roost in a suburban development like this," says Walt Thurber of Media, an Audubon Society member.
NEWS
November 30, 1989 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
It's like something out of a Hitchcock movie. Vultures. In Upper Providence. Ruth Bretz first spotted them last winter. They were perched in the dense pine trees near her home on Pin Oak Road. By winter's end they had left. Then this fall . . . This fall . . . They're baaaack. "Did you ever see Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds? When they fly over it sure makes you think of that," Bretz said of a flock of nearly two dozen vultures that have recently taken up residence in her neighborhood.
NEWS
February 12, 2013 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kay Schuh has a dead vulture hanging in her backyard and is grateful for it. Until the bird was strung up last month by a federal wildlife biologist, Schuh's Mount Holly neighborhood had been taken over by what some see as vandals of the sky. For about nine winters, the pine trees in her backyard have hosted an increasing number of roosting vultures. "The smell is horrible," Schuh said. "You can see [droppings] all over our bushes and our shed in the back. " Schuh, mother of three, said her family routinely has had to clean dog Jake's feet before letting him in after a trip to the yard.
NEWS
March 1, 2006 | By Bob Holt
Vultures have always had an image problem. The finest public-relations firm in the country would have a hard time rebuilding their image. So enthusiasts in Wenonah have decided to do the job themselves. On Saturday, Wenonah will host the first Gloucester County Vulture Festival from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Community Center. The event will feature vulture poetry, music and informational presentations. About 100 vultures have wintered in Wenonah the last four years. Ninety percent are turkey vultures.
NEWS
April 8, 1997 | By Natalie Kostelni, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Forget about the swallows at Capistrano. Buzzards have decided to roost here along the Perkiomen Creek. To the annoyance of borough officials and residents, the fowl - also known as turkey vultures - have made their homes atop pine trees and two light-green water towers. Up to 100 buzzards hover over borough and creek. They damage the trees, breaking branches when they push off for flight, and their droppings have started to corrode the paint on the water towers, leaving streaks of rust.
NEWS
December 22, 1991 | By Ralph Vigoda, Inquirer Staff Writer
Standing on a bluff 80 feet above the Pacific Ocean, with a view that stretched forever, shirtless, ponytailed Dan Deuel was having a few of his daily close encounters of the furred kind. He was feeding three California harbor seal pups, ridiculously cute, amazingly soft animals, totally oblivious to the fact that they were rolling around in their own poop. As they sunned themselves on their backs, eyes closed and flippers held close to their sides, they looked like cuddly, stuffed slugs.
NEWS
February 7, 2006 | By Adam Fifield INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The buzzards are back in Wenonah - and some folks think it's about time they had a festival. "Look alive!" is the motto. On such a note, organizers had planned on ordering a cake shaped like a roadkill opossum, but thought better of it. "We decided to go with more conventional food," said Richard Dilks of the Wenonah Environmental Commission, an organizer of the Gloucester County Vulture Festival. Scheduled for March 4 at the Wenonah Community Center, the event, featuring music, poetry, and a presentation by a bird enthusiast, will celebrate what has been for some a source of annoyance and even consternation.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2006 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
A woman, an armchair, a viola: Laurie Anderson's The End of the Moon is a stripped-down, 90-minute performance art piece about time, space, fear, regret and the notion that "life itself is just bad art. " Anderson floated the latter idea - that the real world is full of "jumbled characters, who disappear without warning / And too many writers, working all night" - from the candlelit stage of the Prince Music Theater Thursday, the first of three...
NEWS
February 3, 1991 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, Special to The Inquirer
A lesser black-backed gull and a Lincoln sparrow were this year's jewels in the crown for observers in the 1990 Glenolden Christmas Bird Count. The gull, a European species that often makes its winter home along the East Coast, had never been spotted during the annual count. "It was definitely one of the highlights" of the count, said Walt Thurber, count compiler. The bird probably wandered inland from the coast, Thurber said. It was seen at the Springton Reservoir. The Lincoln sparrow seen near Brookhaven also was a rare sighting - the last and only one having been counted in 1959.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 12, 2013 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kay Schuh has a dead vulture hanging in her backyard and is grateful for it. Until the bird was strung up last month by a federal wildlife biologist, Schuh's Mount Holly neighborhood had been taken over by what some see as vandals of the sky. For about nine winters, the pine trees in her backyard have hosted an increasing number of roosting vultures. "The smell is horrible," Schuh said. "You can see [droppings] all over our bushes and our shed in the back. " Schuh, mother of three, said her family routinely has had to clean dog Jake's feet before letting him in after a trip to the yard.
NEWS
September 26, 2010 | By Chelsea Conaboy, Inquirer Staff Writer
With 112 undeveloped acres, beautiful scenery, and easy public access, the old Maple Ridge Golf Club in Gloucester County has all the makings of a park. Thanks to the housing slump, it may even have a willing seller. Development firm IBG Partners of Washington, which proposed building 143 houses on the land, has talked with county officials about selling the property for conservation. But locals who want to see the land preserved - some of whom have worked for nearly three years toward that goal - face the obstacle plaguing conservationists throughout the region.
NEWS
July 3, 2006 | By Lisa Pupo
As spring flourished in the western suburbs, unfurling the leaves of our canopy, we were pleased to discover a bird's nest in the depths of a crimson rhododendron bush. We watched from the den windows as Mom hauled in her household requirements: sticks, mud, leaves, grass. We weren't the only ones watching. Our dog, Chance, began prowling the bush, body plunged so far into the greenery that only his trembling tail betrayed his presence. We tried to distract him from temptation with sticks, toys and balls.
NEWS
March 1, 2006 | By Bob Holt
Vultures have always had an image problem. The finest public-relations firm in the country would have a hard time rebuilding their image. So enthusiasts in Wenonah have decided to do the job themselves. On Saturday, Wenonah will host the first Gloucester County Vulture Festival from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Community Center. The event will feature vulture poetry, music and informational presentations. About 100 vultures have wintered in Wenonah the last four years. Ninety percent are turkey vultures.
NEWS
February 7, 2006 | By Adam Fifield INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The buzzards are back in Wenonah - and some folks think it's about time they had a festival. "Look alive!" is the motto. On such a note, organizers had planned on ordering a cake shaped like a roadkill opossum, but thought better of it. "We decided to go with more conventional food," said Richard Dilks of the Wenonah Environmental Commission, an organizer of the Gloucester County Vulture Festival. Scheduled for March 4 at the Wenonah Community Center, the event, featuring music, poetry, and a presentation by a bird enthusiast, will celebrate what has been for some a source of annoyance and even consternation.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2006 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
A woman, an armchair, a viola: Laurie Anderson's The End of the Moon is a stripped-down, 90-minute performance art piece about time, space, fear, regret and the notion that "life itself is just bad art. " Anderson floated the latter idea - that the real world is full of "jumbled characters, who disappear without warning / And too many writers, working all night" - from the candlelit stage of the Prince Music Theater Thursday, the first of three...
NEWS
July 18, 2000 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Debbie Wamstall showed up because she likes horror movies, and nothing can top the real thing. Andrew Hiles came because he is 6. Although the bug and snake walks had been swell, the chance to see real bones, dead bodies and other gory stuff was irresistible. And Gay Overdevest? She was the instigator, leading what has to be the oddest nature walk in the area - a search for turkey vultures, those eaters of the dead and decomposing. "You guys," she told her audience approvingly, "have to be as morbid and gross as I am. " Most nature walks focus on the planet's prettier side - butterflies, wildflowers, songbirds.
NEWS
January 23, 1998 | By Bridget Eklund, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Larry Lewis has been a birder for 25 years. He began as a boy with a feeder outside his window, and progressed to expeditions to Canada for a glimpse of a spruce grouse. He'll regale listeners with tales of being swooped on by owls and drifting through the Florida Everglades with only a good set of binoculars to fend off alligators. It's all part of the job now for this former Chester County park ranger turned professional guide, who can't peel his eyes away from a good set of feathers.
NEWS
April 8, 1997 | By Natalie Kostelni, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Forget about the swallows at Capistrano. Buzzards have decided to roost here along the Perkiomen Creek. To the annoyance of borough officials and residents, the fowl - also known as turkey vultures - have made their homes atop pine trees and two light-green water towers. Up to 100 buzzards hover over borough and creek. They damage the trees, breaking branches when they push off for flight, and their droppings have started to corrode the paint on the water towers, leaving streaks of rust.
NEWS
December 22, 1991 | By Ralph Vigoda, Inquirer Staff Writer
Standing on a bluff 80 feet above the Pacific Ocean, with a view that stretched forever, shirtless, ponytailed Dan Deuel was having a few of his daily close encounters of the furred kind. He was feeding three California harbor seal pups, ridiculously cute, amazingly soft animals, totally oblivious to the fact that they were rolling around in their own poop. As they sunned themselves on their backs, eyes closed and flippers held close to their sides, they looked like cuddly, stuffed slugs.
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