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NEWS
November 17, 1998
Let us pause for a moment to praise the mighty bog turtle. Reviled, driven almost to extinction, its habitat drained of life and nearly paved over, the Mid-Atlantic bog turtle is finally getting a chance to fight back. And, in so doing, it is helping us save the distinctive, valuable wetlands that are its habitat and are crucial to our East Coast ecology. As Inquirer writer Sandy Bauers noted Sunday, the bog turtle, plagued by development and by poachers who sell individual turtles at a profit, has now been accorded a spot on the federal endangered-species list.
NEWS
May 29, 1987 | By FRANK DOUGHERTY, Daily News Staff Writer
Call it the Case of the Missing Carp and Turtle. Or the Chinatown Caper. "The carp and turtle mysteriously abandoned at the Daily Fresh Seafood House now have mysteriously disappeared," reported Leonard Knox, an anti- cruelty agent with the Pennsylvania SPCA. The only evidence remaining today is the 40-gallon aquarium that the creatures once called home. It's still standing behind the front plate-glass window of the Chinese restaurant on 11th Street near Race. Knox said he last saw the pair about 12:30 p.m. yesterday while visiting nearby Chinese-operated businesses in hopes of locating the owners of the shuttered restaurant.
NEWS
March 23, 1991 | ANDREA MIHALIK/ DAILY NEWS
A trio of doctors from Baltimore attending a local conference witness the first gushes of the Swann Memorial Fountain, reactivated with the advent of spring. The fountain at Logan Square, 18th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway, received a privately funded, $2 million restoration that was completed last summer after a much longer dry spell dating to 1989.
NEWS
June 2, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
The New Jersey Legislature has unanimously passed a bill that would ban harvesting of the diamondback terrapin, which is believed to be the only turtle in the world that lives in brackish waters with mixed salinity. The federal government classifies the terrapin, known as Malaclemys terrapin , as a species of "special concern," and most states between Massachusetts and Florida have already imposed moratoriums. The bill, which is on Gov. Christie's desk, mirrors a regulation being considered by the state Department of Environmental Protection.
NEWS
March 28, 2000 | By Ira Josephs, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Even if Marc Young didn't have all the right moves his freshman year, he had seen the right movie. Young, now a senior at the Haverford School, was stretching with his lacrosse teammates three years ago. The guys were talking about movies, and North Shore, an obscure 1987 surfing film, came up. Young was one of the only team members who had seen it, and he was promptly nicknamed "Turtle," after one of the characters. "I wasn't incredibly fast, but I wasn't a real turtle," Young said with a laugh.
NEWS
January 28, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
New Jersey's Department of Environmental Protection has shut down the harvesting of a coastal turtle due to its declining numbers and a rise in demand from overseas markets for food products. The season for commercial harvesting of the northern diamondback terrapin began Nov. 1 and was scheduled to continue until March 31, but DEP Commissioner Bob Martin signed an order Tuesday ending it immediately. "The diamondback terrapin has long been special to many people who live in or visit our coastal communities," said Commissioner Martin in a statement.
NEWS
January 14, 2016 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Medical staff at The Pennsylvania SPCA's Shelter Hospital were sure the red-eared slider turtle brought in last week, still frozen in a container, was dead. "When we looked at her there were no signs of life," said Alicia Royer, nursing supervisor. But turtles can go into a state similar to hibernation when their heartbeat can drop to one or two beats a minute, she said. Not wanting to give up, they contacted a reptile expert at the University Of Pennsylvania veterinary hospital, who suggested warmth therapy.
NEWS
May 6, 1987 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
Someone has taken off with Kellye, the two-headed turtle with an extra leg, two extra feet, an appetite for live goldfish and no known gender. Yesterday, Kellye's owners at Martin's Aquarium in Jenkintown issued a public plea to whoever kidnapped the freakish turtle they say they treat like their own child: Keep him/her/them warm and wet, and please, remember the live goldfish. "It has to have that," said Deborah Brown, an assistant to owner Joel Martin, "or it will die. " Kellye, who hails from Nashville, Tenn.
NEWS
July 14, 2013 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
The yellow-spotted green turtle that sparked mayhem this week on a Jersey Shore route may have left its home in the woods because of recent heavy rains or because of a strong nesting instinct. Or it might have just had a hankering for something different to eat. Area wildlife officials, science professors, and researchers offered insight Friday into the secret lives of the turtles that usually inhabit burrows and ponds, but that sometimes cause three-car crashes. After the turtle wandered onto Route 30 in Atlantic County on Wednesday afternoon, a line of traffic on the busy four-lane highway swerved and then came to a crawl.
NEWS
January 31, 1988 | By Gail Krueger-Nicholson, Special to The Inquirer
Neighbors of the proposed Longwood Village shopping center in East Marlborough say the 33-acre site is home to a red-tailed hawk, woodcocks, foxes, groundhogs, and, possibly, the endangered Pennsylvania bog turtle. The neighbors have rallied around the bog turtle, hoping the elusive creature might prove to be to Longwood Village what the snail darter was to a proposed dam in Tennessee. Dr. Steven M. Jones, an ecologist, confirmed that the tract north of Route 1, between Schoolhouse and Bayard Roads, provides wetland habitat for a variety of wildlife and that the area could contain bog turtles.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 26, 2016 | By Carolyn Wyman, FOR DoTHIS
Diggerland was designed as a place for kids to play on downsized or safety-modified excavators, backhoes, and asphalt rollers. What surprised the owners of America's only construction-equipment amusement park after it opened two years ago in West Berlin, Camden County, is the number of adults who were clogging up the ride lines. Enter Diggerland XL , the new adult sandbox where grown-ups get to try full-size wheel loaders, excavators, and bulldozers on for size for extra-large money.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2016 | By Casey Gilman, STAFF WRITER
Did you know that some sea turtles blow bubbles out of their noses and eat them? It's one of the many fascinating things I learned at the new Sea Turtle Cove exhibit at Adventure Aquarium . You can feed Stitches, Bob, and Old Green, and meet the hatchling, Koopa. You can also find out about conservancy efforts and what you can do to help the turtles. Here are a few more unexpected things I discovered while visiting the exhibit: 1. Adult sea turtles can be massive What surprises people most when they first see the turtles up close is their size.
NEWS
June 2, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
The New Jersey Legislature has unanimously passed a bill that would ban harvesting of the diamondback terrapin, which is believed to be the only turtle in the world that lives in brackish waters with mixed salinity. The federal government classifies the terrapin, known as Malaclemys terrapin , as a species of "special concern," and most states between Massachusetts and Florida have already imposed moratoriums. The bill, which is on Gov. Christie's desk, mirrors a regulation being considered by the state Department of Environmental Protection.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
STONE HARBOR, N.J. - On a gray, unseasonably chilly day last week, two turtle hatchlings emerged from their winter hibernation inside a hole three inches beneath the sand at the Jersey Shore. The diamondback terrapins, a unique turtle that lives in brackish waters along the coast and Delaware Bay, would soon taste freedom for the first time. But first, a biologist with the Wetlands Institute in Stone Harbor would have to remove the wire cages that had been placed above their nests last fall to protect the hatchlings - each the size of a quarter - from raccoons, skunks, and other predators.
NEWS
January 28, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
New Jersey's Department of Environmental Protection has shut down the harvesting of a coastal turtle due to its declining numbers and a rise in demand from overseas markets for food products. The season for commercial harvesting of the northern diamondback terrapin began Nov. 1 and was scheduled to continue until March 31, but DEP Commissioner Bob Martin signed an order Tuesday ending it immediately. "The diamondback terrapin has long been special to many people who live in or visit our coastal communities," said Commissioner Martin in a statement.
NEWS
January 14, 2016 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Medical staff at The Pennsylvania SPCA's Shelter Hospital were sure the red-eared slider turtle brought in last week, still frozen in a container, was dead. "When we looked at her there were no signs of life," said Alicia Royer, nursing supervisor. But turtles can go into a state similar to hibernation when their heartbeat can drop to one or two beats a minute, she said. Not wanting to give up, they contacted a reptile expert at the University Of Pennsylvania veterinary hospital, who suggested warmth therapy.
NEWS
July 30, 2015 | By Madeline R. Conway, Inquirer Staff Writer
Preschool students at the NHS Human Services facility in Kensington welcomed some four-legged classmates on Tuesday: a palm-size hedgehog, a turtle, and a spotted rabbit. And there were also a couple of two-legged friends, an Asian chicken and a stuffed toy orangutan, both which got everyone's attention. So instead of playing with building blocks or perusing picture books, the 50 or so developmentally delayed 3- to 5-year-olds gathered with their new friends for a hands-on lesson from two presenters from the Philadelphia Zoo, Toni Mosley and Maren Stinson.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
The Happy Together Tour that sold out the Keswick Theatre on Wednesday was stuck - gleefully - in the American flower-power 1960s. Flo & Eddie of the Turtles (whose 1967 hit lent the show its name), the Buckinghams, the Association, the Grass Roots, the Cowsills, and Mark Lindsay (from Paul Revere and the Raiders) rippled through sunshiny harmonies, dewy rhythms, and lilting melodies. But beneath those lovely surfaces were depths of darker loveliness. The bubblegum psychedelia of the Summer of Love was but the prettier harmonic sister of weightier, inward-looking '60s jams from Dylan and Hendrix.
TRAVEL
April 20, 2015 | By Gary Frisch, For The Inquirer
CANCUN, Mexico - For most sea turtles, crawling onto the beach at night to lay eggs is a risky proposition. Out of the water, they are achingly slow, ungainly . . . and vulnerable. But in tourist meccas where hotel sprawl has rendered the coastline a virtual Monopoly board of development with 24/7 hubbub, the annual trek onto the sand becomes all the more treacherous. Tourists, cameras in hand, camp out for a look at these massive tortugas, or worse, try to pet them or pose for pictures with them.
TRAVEL
December 29, 2014 | By Eric Vohr, For The Inquirer
Unspoiled white-sand beaches, turquoise-blue waters, frolicking green sea turtles, and bays, lagoons, and reefs so idyllic you have to pinch yourself just to make sure they're real - the Grenadines are one of the most spectacular sailing destinations in the world. In this archipelago of sun-splashed Caribbean islands that stretch from Grenada to St. Vincent, there's so much to explore that it would take a lifetime to truly appreciate it all. With only two weeks and a chartered sailboat, my photographer and I did our best to get a taste of this fabled paradise.
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