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Tuskegee Airmen

NEWS
November 28, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wilson C. Anderson, 87, who served as a radio mechanic with the Tuskegee Airmen during World War II and later was a Philadelphia city employee for 35 years, died Wednesday, Nov. 21, of a stroke at Roxborough Memorial Hospital. Born and raised in Philadelphia, Mr. Anderson attended South Philadelphia High School, dropped out to enter the service, and later earned his GED. He was awarded a bachelor's degree in finance from Villanova University in 1952, and also received a graduate certificate from the Fels Institute of Government.
NEWS
November 13, 2012
Retired Lt. Col. Herbert Eugene Carter, 95, one of the original Tuskegee Airmen who broke color barriers in World War II, has died. Tuskegee Mayor Johnny Ford said Mr. Carter died Thursday afternoon at East Alabama Medical Center. The Tuskegee Airmen were the first black aviators in the U.S. military. During World War II they were trained as a segregated unit in central Alabama at Tuskegee Institute, now Tuskegee University. Mr. Carter was in the first group that trained for the 99th Fighter Squadron.
NEWS
October 26, 2012 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thomas H. Mayfield Jr., 95, one of the original Tuskegee Airmen and a retired special-education teacher in Pemberton Township, died Friday, Oct. 19, at Marcella Nursing and Rehab Center in Burlington. Mr. Mayfield, a longtime resident of Willingboro, achieved the rank of lieutenant colonel in the Army, serving in World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. He earned special recognition as a member of the Tuskegee Airmen, a group selected for training in an Army Air Corps program that taught black men to fly and maintain aircraft at the racially segregated Tuskegee Army Air Field in Alabama in the early 1940s.
NEWS
September 21, 2012 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Henry L. Moore never stopped moving. Born in tiny Ocilla, Ga., in 1921, he was out by 19, after graduating at the top of Ocilla High's Class of 1940. He moved to Newark, N.J., to escape the poverty and racism that had marked his childhood. By 1942, he was on a bus full of draftees en route to Fort Dix, and by 1944, he was in Italy, working on B-25 bombers as a member of the Tuskegee Airmen - the first black aviators to serve in the U.S. military. Then it was off to West Virginia State University, where he earned a physics degree, and a career as a naval researcher.
NEWS
May 29, 2012 | By Valerie Russ and Daily News Staff Writer
On a shady patch of grass, yards from the All Wars Memorial to Colored Soldiers and Sailors, Ronald Richardson, dressed in a gray jacket that looked almost like a Civil War uniform, stood tall and erect as a mountain. He saluted while a trumpeter played "Taps" and a military honor guard lay two wreaths at the monument Monday near Logan Circle on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. "My family was in World War II. My Uncle Dan, may he rest in peace, and my [other] uncle, he was in World War I. They're all gone now," said Richardson, 74, tears welling up in his eyes.
NEWS
March 30, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer
FRANK DELANO Burbage was a proud Marine. So proud, he was able to convince others, including relatives, that they should also become one of the "few, the proud," as a recruiter at the 52nd and Walnut streets office. "He was very convincing," said his brother-in-law, Alfred Burbage Jr., who joined up. Frank Burbage, who served first in the Air Force after being inspired by tales of the Tuskegee Airmen, then joined the Marines and rose to the rank of gunnery sergeant, died March 19. He was 68 and lived in Southwest Philadelphia.' Frank was a typical tough guy with a heart of gold.
NEWS
January 29, 2012 | By Kevin Ferris, Inquirer Columnist
George Lucas, the legendary director of the Star Wars saga, should have taken a few down-to-earth meetings with master storyteller Bertram Levy before he made Red Tails , the story of the African American pilots known today as the Tuskegee Airmen. Critics have not been kind to Lucas' World War II saga. They complain about the depth of the characters and the cliche-ridden dialogue. Most damning are the concerns that the movie doesn't delve deeply enough into the battles against segregation that the airmen had to wage just to help defend their country in wartime.
NEWS
January 24, 2012 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
Looks like Red Tails , George Lucas' World War II biopic about the Tuskegee Airmen, made $19 million over the weekend. Decent, considering its limited opening in the dreaded dead zone between Christmas and the Oscars. I wasn't going to let ho-hum reviews stop me from seeing it. If anything, I went to honor men like Maj. John L. Harrison, one of the 320 surviving airmen (out of about 900) to receive a Congressional Gold Medal in 2007. Harrison saw it, too, and liked it. "I thought it was a superior depiction of aerial combat.
NEWS
January 22, 2012 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
Cuba Gooding Jr. is one of the veteran Tuskegee Airmen. That is, the actor plays a base commander in the new, George Lucas -produced Red Tails, an action-packed account of the daring aerial exploits of the famed all-black flying unit of World War II. And Gooding was one of the young African American aces who took to the skies to shoot down Nazis in 1995's HBO drama The Tuskegee Airmen . Both films show...
NEWS
January 21, 2012
Prosecutor to take 5th in gun probe WASHINGTON - A federal prosecutor in Arizona intends to remain silent if called for questioning in a congressional probe of a problem-plagued gun-smuggling investigation. Patrick Cunningham's decision to invoke his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination in the investigation of Operation Fast and Furious was disclosed Friday after the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee subpoenaed him. Committee Chairman Darrell Issa (R., Calif.)
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