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Tuskegee Airmen

NEWS
November 24, 2011
Airmen's story inspirational Re: "Remember veterans who fought many battles," Nov. 11: On Tuesday night, I had the privilege of joining more than 150 fellow Philadelphians at the National Constitution Center for a screening of the new documentary about the Tuskegee Airmen, Double Victory. While the film was terrific, it was the after-movie speakers who were really extraordinary. Mount Airy resident Dr. Eugene Richardson, one of the famed aviators, was joined by fellow airmen on stage and in the audience.
NEWS
November 11, 2011
In a moving scene from a new documentary about the Tuskegee Airmen, African American pilots stage a peaceful sit-in at an all-white military facility. Their courage, and the battles they fought during World War II both on the battlefield and at home, are recounted in Double Victory, filmmaker George Lucas' attempt to promote more awareness of the Tuskegee Airmen. The film's release on Veteran's Day, and coinciding with the 70th anniversary of the airmen's first class of cadets, is fitting.
NEWS
November 3, 2011
PHILADELPHIA U. City explosion A damaged power line led to an explosion yesterday in University City that sent three manhole covers flying and left smoke billowing up from underground, police said. A wire below 34th Street near Ludlow sparked and ignited methane gas, causing the blast about 5:15 p.m., police said. A stretch of 34th Street between Market and Ludlow was closed to traffic while Peco technicians secured the area. No injuries or power outages were reported.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2011 | By Mia Mask, For The Inquirer
When you think about World War II, military leaders such as George S. Patton and Douglas MacArthur often come to mind. But how much do you know about the Tuskegee Airmen? Now's your chance to learn about the first African American military pilots, who fought valiantly against fascism during the war. The African American Museum in Philadelphia is offering a free screening Thursday night of Double Victory, a new documentary by filmmaker George Lucas about the recruitment, training, and combat missions of the Tuskegee Airmen.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2011
Special Events Heroween Featuring games, prizes, costumes, beer and fun, to support the Ronald McDonald House. City Tap House, 3925 Walnut St. $10. 10/29. 9 pm. Double Victory Documentary on the Tuskegee Airmen and panel discussion. African American Museum. Free. 11/3. 7 pm. Pregistration required at http://doublevictory-philly.eventbrite.com Jon Anderson and Rick Wakeman Of the progressive rock band Yes, with classics from the catalog, songs from their new album 'The Living Tree,' and songs from solo repertoire.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2011 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
'It's Top Gun with black pilots. " So Terrence Howard describes with a punchy tagline his film, Red Tails , a WWII actioner about the famed Tuskegee Airmen, the first group of African American fighter pilots in the U.S. armed forces. Conceived by George Lucas and in development for nearly 25 years, the Anthony Hemingway-helmed Red Tails is due Jan. 20, 2012. It is billed as a passionate statement about civil rights but also - or given marketing needs, above all - an epic Hollywood blockbuster filled with hair-raising set pieces.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2011 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
They were trailblazers and gave new meaning to "the sky's the limit. " They were the first black U.S. military pilots in World War II, known as the Tuskegee Airmen. Fifty photographs of the Tuskegee Airmen, who fought America's enemies abroad while facing racial discrimination at home, opened Thursday at Philadelphia International Airport. The exhibit, which will be on display through June in Terminal A-East, is a photo essay of seven decades of aviation history. On hand were four original Tuskegee Airmen, named for the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, where they trained, an all-black unit of World War II pilots, navigators, bombardiers, mechanics, and others.
NEWS
December 18, 2010 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Viola D. Stewart, 91, a civil-rights pioneer and retired Philadelphia public school teacher, died of Alzheimer's disease Dec. 14 at the Sanctuary of Holy Cross, a nursing home in Burtonsville, Md. After she became a teacher in the early 1940s in South Carolina, Mrs. Stewart was the plaintiff in 1944 in an NAACP-backed lawsuit seeking equal pay for African American teachers. With NAACP attorney Thurgood Marshall making her case, she won. The litigation is among cases credited with helping pave the way for the 1954 landmark case, Brown v. Board of Education , her family said.
NEWS
October 6, 2010 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
HARRY W. BOSTON, a teacher in Philadelphia public schools for more than 30 years, an Air Force veteran of World War II and a devoted churchman whose lusty voice was raised in praise at Miller Memorial Baptist Church for more than 70 years, died Thursday. He would have been 86 tomorrow. He lived in Mount Airy. Harry taught at Kenderton Elementary, Lingelbach Elementary, the Eleanor C. Emlen School and Benjamin Franklin High School. Even after he retired in 1984, he continued as an educator, teaching for four more years at the Sanctuary Christian Academy, founded by Bishop Audrey Bronson.
NEWS
May 26, 2010
Raymond V. Haysbert Sr., 90, whose Parks Sausage Co. in 1969 became the first black-owned business in the United States to go public, died Monday at a Baltimore hospital after suffering from congestive heart failure, his son Brian Haysbert said. Born in poverty, Mr. Haysbert became a member of the famed Tuskegee Airmen, serving in Africa and Italy before settling in Baltimore. There, he joined the company started by Henry Parks that became well-known throughout the Northeast by advertisements featuring a hungry boy asking, "More Parks Sausages, Mom - please!"
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