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Tutankhamun

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NEWS
February 4, 2007 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sure, that Street fellow is still in charge through the rest of the year. And Fattah, Knox and the rest are busy angling for his seat. But there's a new ruler in Philadelphia, starting yesterday: Tutankhamun. If tickets were ballots, Tut would already have blown past all those other guys - with more than 400,000 sold so far for dates between now and September. He's got better bling, too. First-day visitors marveled as they wandered through room after room of glittering Egyptian history at the Franklin Institute, including items from the boy king's tomb and from other Egyptian royals of his time.
NEWS
December 1, 2009 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
The next blockbuster show to be hosted by the Franklin Institute is "Cleopatra: The Search for the Last Queen of Egypt. " The for-profit exhibition will make its worldwide debut in Philadelphia, running from June 5 to Jan. 2, 2011, before moving on to four other cities. By importing "Cleopatra," the science museum hopes to repeat some of the box-office success of "Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs," which also ran for seven months and drew 1.3 million visitors to the Franklin in 2007.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2007 | By Matt Blanchard FOR THE INQUIRER
They say you can't take it with you, but Tutankhamun sure tried. Sent to the afterlife in a solid-gold sarcophagus, the boy king was accompanied by a burial treasure trove so extravagant it included a second sarcophagus, fashioned of gold and semiprecious stones, just to hold his mummified liver. On Saturday, the glittering liver coffin and 130 other artifacts go on display at the Franklin Institute, as the traveling exhibition "Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs" begins what promises to be a blockbuster seven-month Philadelphia run. Advance ticket sales have already reached 400,000, the largest presale in the museum's history.
NEWS
September 5, 2007 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
With its long run in Philadelphia, Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs at the Franklin Institute is "on pace" to break the U.S. traveling-exhibition attendance record for a single city, the Franklin says. The show has sold 1.18 million tickets - 1.13 million of which have been used - and has a month to go in its eight-month Philadelphia visit, prompting museum officials to predict yesterday that it will break the previous record of 1.3 million visitors set in 1977 when Treasures of Tutankhamun visited the Field Museum in Chicago.
NEWS
December 3, 2004 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Tutankhamun, the fabled boy pharaoh whose tomb treasures dazzled museum-goers in the late 1970s, is returning to America for an encore next summer. The final stop of the four-city American tour of "Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaoh" is yet to be selected, but it could be Philadelphia. A spokesman for the Franklin Institute confirmed yesterday that the science museum was discussing the show with the organizers, a commercial consortium led by Anschutz Entertainment Group of Los Angeles and including Arts & Entertainment International.
NEWS
January 27, 2005 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Philadelphia has been chosen as the fourth and final stop for an exhibition of archaeological artifacts connected to the fabled Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamun, popularly known as King Tut. The show will begin a two-year American tour in Los Angeles this summer. The Franklin Institute was to announce today that it will present the show of about 130 objects between February and September 2007. About 50 of these objects come from Tut's burial chamber, discovered in 1922. These include a gold coffin that held the teenage pharaoh's viscera, a diamond crown, and a solid-silver ceremonial trumpet.
NEWS
September 1, 2007 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Egypt's top antiquities official was down in the fabled tomb of Tutankhamun a few weeks ago - doing a television interview, of all things - when he noticed something curious he had never seen before. In a back room closed to public view, Zahi Hawass spotted a cluster of reed boxes crammed with plaster fragments and limestone seals used to stamp hieroglyphs. Intrigued, the scholar took a closer look and saw that both were marked with a trio of icons - sun, scarab and basket - whose meaning he recognized instantly: Neb-kheperu-re, the throne name of the boy pharaoh.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2007 | By ROBERT STRAUSS For the Daily News
THE EXPLOSION of technology and the good economic times of the early 20th century triggered a gold rush of sorts, leading to inventions and explorations that became media events and created heroes, dead and alive. A race to find the South Pole led to lifelong fame for its 1911 discoverer, Roald Amundsen, and similar media attention for his competitors, such as Ernest Shackleton and Robert F. Scott. Charles Lindbergh became an icon by winning the race to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2006 | By ROBERT STRAUSS For the Daily News
Tutankhamun, the legendary King Tut, owes his fame in large part to a good find in 1922, when Egyptologist Howard Carter discovered Tut's tomb virtually intact. The time around Tut's reign in the middle 1300s B.C. has long been a focus for those studying the ancient world, and over the next several months, Philadelphia will be the home to spectacular exhibitions highlighting that period. The first of them, "Amarna, Ancient Egypt's Place in the Sun," opens Sunday at the University of Pennsylvania Museum, one of the world's great centers of ancient Egyptology and ancient Egyptian artifacts.
NEWS
February 1, 2007 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
David P. Silverman was a young Egyptologist laboring at the University of Chicago's Oriental Institute when he was approached one day in 1976 by the director, Gustavus F. Swift 3d. "He said, 'You know, we're thinking about joining with the Field Museum and doing the Tut exhibit' " then being organized under the auspices of New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art, Silverman recalled the other day. " 'Do you want to do it?' "I said: 'What do you mean, do it? Never mind! Yes!' "And that's basically how it happened.
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NEWS
December 1, 2009 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
The next blockbuster show to be hosted by the Franklin Institute is "Cleopatra: The Search for the Last Queen of Egypt. " The for-profit exhibition will make its worldwide debut in Philadelphia, running from June 5 to Jan. 2, 2011, before moving on to four other cities. By importing "Cleopatra," the science museum hopes to repeat some of the box-office success of "Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs," which also ran for seven months and drew 1.3 million visitors to the Franklin in 2007.
NEWS
September 30, 2007 | By Ashwin Verghese INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With only one weekend to go, the Franklin Institute wanted to cram every last second it could into its nearly eight-month King Tut exhibit. So it did just that. The doors to Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs have been open since Friday morning at 8:30, allowing visitors to come calling at the throne of the legendary boy-king at all hours. The traveling exhibit closes to the public tonight at 11. Although getting into the show during the day would be nearly impossible, Karen Corbin, the Franklin Institute's vice president for programs, marketing and business development, said Tut fans still had a chance to see it by buying tickets at the museum during the day for the show at night.
NEWS
September 5, 2007 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
With its long run in Philadelphia, Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs at the Franklin Institute is "on pace" to break the U.S. traveling-exhibition attendance record for a single city, the Franklin says. The show has sold 1.18 million tickets - 1.13 million of which have been used - and has a month to go in its eight-month Philadelphia visit, prompting museum officials to predict yesterday that it will break the previous record of 1.3 million visitors set in 1977 when Treasures of Tutankhamun visited the Field Museum in Chicago.
NEWS
September 1, 2007 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Egypt's top antiquities official was down in the fabled tomb of Tutankhamun a few weeks ago - doing a television interview, of all things - when he noticed something curious he had never seen before. In a back room closed to public view, Zahi Hawass spotted a cluster of reed boxes crammed with plaster fragments and limestone seals used to stamp hieroglyphs. Intrigued, the scholar took a closer look and saw that both were marked with a trio of icons - sun, scarab and basket - whose meaning he recognized instantly: Neb-kheperu-re, the throne name of the boy pharaoh.
NEWS
May 23, 2007 | By Cody Glenn FOR THE INQUIRER
Imagine the thrill British archaeologist Howard Carter felt when he discovered King Tut's tomb after scouring the Egyptian desert for years. Can't see yourself unearthing gold artifacts and the king's sarcophagi? Then try to remember going on childhood scavenger hunts, scurrying around the neighborhood for soda bottles, a library card and a picture of Mike Schmidt. Add a bit of 21st-century technology, and you have geocaching - a craze that is spreading around the world. "It's the thrill of the hunt," says Brian Vaughan of Narberth, who has been caching with his wife and two children for almost three years.
NEWS
May 10, 2007 | By Helen I. Hwang FOR THE INQUIRER
Chocolate made in the likeness of King Tut seemed like a sweet - and timely - idea to West Chester's own chocolate king, Christopher Curtin. Curtin, proprietor of ?clat Chocolate, created three delicately formed chocolates for the Franklin Institute exhibit "Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs. " Curtin makes desserts in the shape of King Tut's head, a winged scarab and hieroglyphic chocolate shards to celebrate the pharaonic exhibit in Philadelphia, which continues until Sept.
NEWS
March 23, 2007 | By Dave Boyer
The King Tut exhibit at the Franklin Institute is dull, dark and disappointing. But at least the lines are long. More than 600,000 people viewed "Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs" in the show's first six weeks in Philadelphia. Rarely have so many paid so much to see an itty, bitty liver casket. That was my sucker moment. I stood there, beholding the box that once stored Tut's bile, and began to feel rather poorly myself. Thirty-two bucks per ticket, plus parking and numbingly long lines, for this?
NEWS
February 4, 2007 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sure, that Street fellow is still in charge through the rest of the year. And Fattah, Knox and the rest are busy angling for his seat. But there's a new ruler in Philadelphia, starting yesterday: Tutankhamun. If tickets were ballots, Tut would already have blown past all those other guys - with more than 400,000 sold so far for dates between now and September. He's got better bling, too. First-day visitors marveled as they wandered through room after room of glittering Egyptian history at the Franklin Institute, including items from the boy king's tomb and from other Egyptian royals of his time.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2007 | By ROBERT STRAUSS For the Daily News
THE EXPLOSION of technology and the good economic times of the early 20th century triggered a gold rush of sorts, leading to inventions and explorations that became media events and created heroes, dead and alive. A race to find the South Pole led to lifelong fame for its 1911 discoverer, Roald Amundsen, and similar media attention for his competitors, such as Ernest Shackleton and Robert F. Scott. Charles Lindbergh became an icon by winning the race to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2007 | By Matt Blanchard FOR THE INQUIRER
They say you can't take it with you, but Tutankhamun sure tried. Sent to the afterlife in a solid-gold sarcophagus, the boy king was accompanied by a burial treasure trove so extravagant it included a second sarcophagus, fashioned of gold and semiprecious stones, just to hold his mummified liver. On Saturday, the glittering liver coffin and 130 other artifacts go on display at the Franklin Institute, as the traveling exhibition "Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs" begins what promises to be a blockbuster seven-month Philadelphia run. Advance ticket sales have already reached 400,000, the largest presale in the museum's history.
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