FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 14, 1998 | ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ/ DAILY NEWS
Debra Kohn of the Center City law firm of Ballard, Spahr, Andrew and Ingersoll, talks yesterday with Shonte Valentine, 6, a first-grader at Waring Elementary School, in Kohn's building on Market Street. Kohn and Valentine are linked by Philadelphia Reads, a program to help students with their reading. Kohn's firm will read to students every Tuesday during the school term.
NEWS
August 11, 1986 | By KITTY CAPARELLA, Daily News Staff Writer
WANTED: At least four state-certified teachers willing to take on an unusual challenge - teach MOVE children state-approved curriculum 5 1/2 hours a day for 180 days a year. Write or apply in care of MOVE at 1630 S. 56th St. Such an ad might appear in a newspaper these days as four mothers and a lawyer scramble to find tutors to meet state requirements to teach nine MOVE children. The mothers - one MOVE member and three sympathizers of the cult - asked for an extension to Thursday of a hearing in Family Court so they might submit three or four additional names of tutors to the School District for approval.
NEWS
September 28, 1989 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Starting next month, Chester County's juvenile-court master will have a new weapon against delinquency: tutors. Susan Gilhooly will be able to order troubled teenagers into a tutoring program designed to improve their school performance. Her theory is that many youths get into trouble or drop out of school because they have gotten behind and no one bothers to help them catch up. "For the kids we have, half the time there's no place to study. When there's a question, there's nobody to ask," she said.
NEWS
March 13, 2001 | By Kelly Wolfe, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
With 300 students enrolled and 56 on the waiting list, the Adult Literacy Program at the Bayard Taylor Memorial Library is a success. But, organizers have found, success brings added challenges. "We would love to have 56 tutors," program coordinator Sue Calio said. "I would say [that] at any given time we're looking for 50 tutors - that would be our dream - but the waiting list would continue to grow. We have an ongoing need. " Calio said that the program, which helps Spanish-speaking residents learn to read and write English, has become much more popular in recent years and that requests to enter it are not slowing down.
NEWS
February 28, 1990 | By Alexis Moore, Inquirer Washington Bureau
In a noisy, cheerful junior high school cafeteria, where youngsters worked with donated materials and their tutors showed no tolerance for unruliness, a 9-year-old girl chortled, "I beat you, I beat you," as she rolled up points in Scrabble that put her far ahead of her tutor, Gail Johnson. Nearby, a 13-year-old boy who came with no books debated Black History Month with his tutor, Roderick Blair. And three other tutors quietly discussed how to handle an 11-year-old girl, who had been upset by a fight at school and cried on the bus. What the children have in common is the absence in their lives of anything remotely related to stability.
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | By Paul Davies, Special to The Inquirer
Because of lower state funding, the Avon Grove Area school board is expected to reduce the number of hours tutors may work with students needing remedial help. The state reduced the amount of money the school district will receive for its TELLS program this year from $28,878 to $19,183. At a meeting Tuesday, the school board said it was committed to continuing the program despite the budget cuts. "You can always use more money, but we will do the job we can with the money provided," Superintendent Ronald J. Ferrari said.
SPORTS
September 28, 1999 | Daily News Wire Services
Defending national champion Tennessee, which in recent years has uncovered cheating in its advanced-degree programs and a telephone card-fraud scandal among its athletes, is now investigating whether tutors did schoolwork for football players. Tennessee president J. Wade Gilley, who started his job last month, said yesterday the school is following "normal procedure and has turned this matter over to the [university's] general counsel's office for review. Once this review is complete, the university will announce its findings and, if necessary, take appropriate action.
NEWS
August 19, 1997 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Volunteer English Program in Chester County will sponsor a three-session, nine-hour training workshop for those who wish to tutor English as a second language to an adult immigrant. The workshop will be at Westminster Presbyterian Church, 200 S. Church St., West Chester, from 6 to 9 p.m. on Sept. 16, 18 and 23. Prospective tutors must attend all three. For more information or to register, call 610-640-4699. TRIBUTE Beth Israel Congregation, 385 Pottstown Pike, Eagle, will honor Herbert Baer, a longtime member of the congregation active for many years in the Coatesville community, at special Shabbat services Friday at 8 p.m. Baer is moving to the Boston area.
NEWS
December 3, 1989 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
Doreen Johnson sat in the third row of a Villanova University biology lab bent over her textbook. To her right sat Sandra Zeigler, who offered a few words of encouragement and help with Johnson's math problem. Johnson, in a navy blue Villanova sweatshirt and dark blue slacks, and Zeigler, dressed in a sweater and jeans, looked like typical college students helping each other study. But Johnson is a high school student being tutored by Zeigler, a Villanova sophomore.
NEWS
September 5, 2000 | By Kate Herman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Luz Elena Gonzalez de Herrera, an expectant mother in Kennett Square, wants to teach her firstborn to speak English - but first, she must learn the language herself. Like Gonzalez, more than 300 Kennett-area residents have turned to the Adult Literacy Program at the Bayard Taylor Memorial Library for one-on-one coaching in reading, writing and speaking English. But with 65 people still on a waiting list, the volunteer program needs more tutors. And though the students - most of whose native language is Spanish - have to be over the age of 17, there is no age requirement for teachers.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 25, 2014 | By Casey Fabris, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Linda Littlejohn, retirement is more than relaxation. After 25 years as a dentist, she stopped working for the first time in 2003. But Littlejohn soon found she was too restless to be retired. She enrolled at Chestnut Hill College and got her master's degree in education, and put in seven years teaching special education in the Philadelphia schools. Then she retired again. Sort of. For more than a year, Littlejohn, 72, has been volunteering twice a week as a tutor at Philadelphia's Center for Literacy.
NEWS
April 13, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
A DELAWARE COUNTY man is facing charges of rape, sexual assault, corruption of minors and related offenses for allegedly forcing a boy he was tutoring to perform sex acts on him. And this victim might not be his only one, according to police. Alexander Brengle, 27, of Wayne, was arrested Thursday after an 18-year-old male came forward and told investigators from the Special Victims Unit that in 2009, when he was 14 years old and being tutored by Brengle, the man repeatedly assaulted him during a nearly two-month span, court records show.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2013 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Synergy may be one of the more overexposed buzzwords of our era. But it's an inescapable theme in the story behind Workstream, the online-tutoring app that won first-place honors - and $5,000 in seed money - for a team of high schoolers at Tuesday's Switch Philly. First, put six students in a Saturday program at Temple University designed to stir their interest in math, science, and engineering. Then invite them to brainstorm for a "hackathon" focused on developing apps or other products addressing problems in our educational system.
FOOD
October 4, 2011 | By Ashley Primis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Besides what culinary schools are offering this fall, restaurants, kitchen stores, and even supermarkets are offering cooking classes on topics ranging from the yummy (cupcakes) to the sensible (healthy eating). Local food bloggers are getting in on the action by passing their niche expertise on to students, at both regional venues and in-home events. Also of note is a new Rittenhouse spot called Cook, where students get to interact with their favorite chefs, while getting fed.   Teaspoons & Petals is a blog that was founded by Alexis Siemons in 2008.
NEWS
July 24, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Shirley Wang Ling made her New York recital debut in June 1978, a New York Times reviewer wrote that he was touched. In her performance at Carnegie Recital Hall, the writer stated, Mrs. Ling "impressed as a player with distinct interpretive talents, particularly in music that is gentle or introspective. " And, he wrote, she "extracted more sweetness and charm from Liszt's Hungarian Rhapsody No. 12 than many other performers do. " The reviewer noted that, though this was her New York debut, "she has frequently been heard in the Boston, Baltimore, and Philadelphia areas.
NEWS
March 28, 2011 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
The first child to sit down to read with Prudential analyst Vinina Hawkins at her Dresher office was the tallest first grader Hawkins had ever seen. Then came a stubborn student who called reading a bore, and there was the little actress who read aloud as though she were auditioning. "I would say, 'There's no exclamation point there,' " Hawkins said. "And she would say, 'But there should be. I'm so excited.' " At lunchtime Tuesday, Hawkins was coaching her eighth West Oak Lane Charter School student in eight years - 6-year-old Moriah Taylor.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2011 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: The daughter of a friend tutored my son in SAT prep. She does not have professional credentials, but she tests very well and we thought she might be able to help him. His score actually dropped the second time he took the test. We had put our trust in this girl and paid her hundreds of dollars. She is now trying to get more tutoring gigs and asked if she can list me as a reference. I don't want to hurt her feelings (hence I haven't told her about my son's lower score), but I can't in good conscience tell another parent that she knows what she's doing.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2010
DEAR ABBY: I would like to comment on your reply to "Helping or Cheating?," the young lady who has been helping her boyfriend with his homework. I can see where someone might find this a problem. I retired a few years ago after 35 years as an educator and still substitute-teach three to five days a week. I feel I can speak for many teachers on this matter: For years, teachers have used a method called "peer tutoring" in and out of the classroom. From the information given, what that girl is doing sounds like textbook tutoring.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2010
DEAR ABBY: I'm an "A" student, but my boyfriend, "Rory," has a difficult time in school, so he often comes over for help. We work at the computer in the room my sister and I share so she listens to everything we discuss. She says we are cheating because I'm doing most of his homework for him. I don't give Rory the answers to questions, but I do give him "hints" and tell him where he's likely to find the answers in the textbooks. I always check that the answers are correct. With his math homework, I tell him each step he needs to take, but he actually does the math himself and then I check for accuracy.
SPORTS
April 13, 2010 | By Bob Brookover INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The results are always more important than the reasons and if Ryan Howard had his way, he'd probably let his white-hot start speak for itself. After his sixth two-hit game of a season in its embryonic stage, Howard didn't have any desire to get overly analytical following the Phillies' 7-4 win Monday in their home opener against the Washington Nationals. "My focus at the dish is just trying to hit the ball where it's pitched," he said. With a .375 average, four doubles, a triple, three home runs, and 11 RBIs, it's obvious Howard's focus and approach is working better than it ever has at the start of a season, which brings us to the possible reasons why. We already knew that manager Charlie Manuel had encouraged Howard to move closer to home plate this season.
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