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Tv Guide

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BUSINESS
August 9, 1988 | By Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
The dazzle of Walter H. Annenberg's crown jewel - TV Guide - became too overpowering for Rupert Murdoch. Knees buckled and heartbeats skipped throughout the publishing world yesterday as competitors, analysts and advertising executives tried to digest the news announced Sunday that the international media magnate plunked down $3 billion for TV Guide and the rest of the Annenberg publishing empire, a staggering record for the industry. Instantaneously, Murdoch surpassed the total circulation of the giant Time Inc., becoming the biggest magazine publisher in the nation, based on the combined circulation of TV Guide, the three other Annenberg publications he is buying and the six magazines Murdoch already owned.
NEWS
February 1, 1989 | By Terry Bivens, Inquirer Staff Writer
Want the inside story on Moonlighting's bickering Maddie and David? What's in the stars for Vanna and Burt? Forget Springsteen: Elvis is still King! A typical month's headlines for the National Enquirer? The Star? Try TV Guide. Once as reserved and prosperous as its Radnor surroundings, TV Guide, the nation's third-largest magazine in circulation, is beginning life anew under Rupert Murdoch. And if the first three months are any indication, the man they call Rapid Rupert may well shake TV Guide to its Main Line roots.
NEWS
January 8, 2003 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Brian P. Bradfield, 82, of Exton, a retired executive for Triangle Publications who helped launch TV Guide, died of complications from Parkinson's disease Sunday at Paoli Memorial Hospital. In 1953 Walter H. Annenberg, then president of Triangle Publications, selected Mr. Bradfield and a small group of executives to inaugurate TV Guide. In order to eliminate competition, Mr. Bradfield traveled around the country, buying local television magazines to merge with TV Guide. In 1968 he was appointed vice president and general manager of TV Guide in Radnor.
BUSINESS
September 26, 1989 | By Terry Bivens, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joe R. Robinowitz, an 11-year veteran of the Rupert Murdoch media empire, was named yesterday to succeed recently departed David Sendler as national editor of TV Guide in Radnor. Robinowitz, 38, had been general manager of WFTX-TV in Boston, part of Murdoch's Fox Broadcasting Co. Earlier this month, Murdoch agreed to sell the station to the Boston Celtics for an estimated $50 million after the Federal Communications Commission refused to waive its rule prohibiting ownership by one company of a television station and newspaper in the same market.
BUSINESS
February 19, 1990 | By Susan Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
TV Guide magazine has renewed its lease at Four Radnor Corporate Center for five more years. The lease, valued at $7 million, is for the entire 164,000- square-foot building, which has been the magazine's corporate headquarters since it was built in 1980. The TV Guide building, on Matsonford Road near King of Prussia Road, is part of the 72-acre Radnor Corporate Center, developed by the Radnor Corp., the real estate development wing of Sun Co. Greystone Realty Corp.
NEWS
October 24, 1988 | By Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
David Lichtenberg, former circulation director of TV Guide magazine and Triangle Circulation Co., died Friday. He was 78 and lived in Swarthmore. A circulation executive with a national reputation, Lichtenberg served as circulation director from 1962 until his retirement in 1976. At the time of his retirement, Triangle Circulation Co. was the national distributor for TV Guide, Seventeen, Ziff-Davis Publishing Co. Inc., Yankee Inc. (The Old Farmer's Alamanac), Popular Library books and magazines, Sporting News, Home Garden magazine and a number of other periodicals.
BUSINESS
April 6, 1989 | By Kevin Haney, Daily News Staff Writer
Valerie B. Salembier, who only six months ago became publisher of TV Guide, quit abruptly yesterday to become president of the New York Post newspaper. In a phone interview, Salembier said she had some slight disagreements with executives inside News Corporation of America, the company that owns TV Guide. But she said the chance to run the Post, not the disagreements, lured her away from TV Guide unexpectedly. "I've had a wish to run a daily newspaper," Salembier said, adding that the Post job was a chance to rebuild an ailing newspaper.
NEWS
August 28, 1997 | by Scott Williams, New York Daily News
TV Guide executives are wincing under the latest salvo from "ER" cast members. Not surprisingly, "ER" hunk George Clooney, who last season led a show boycott against "Entertainment Tonight," is in the midst of the fray. The spat erupted earlier this summer when apprentice hunk Noah Wyle refused to pose for a cover story because castmate Eriq LaSalle had done so 18 months earlier and was still waiting for it to appear. TV Guide, notorious among free-lancers for commissioning stories and killing them, responded with a placatory gesture.
BUSINESS
August 22, 1988 | By Terry Bivens, Inquirer Staff Writer
At first glance, TV Guide, soon to become part of the Rupert Murdoch media empire, would appear to be under siege. Several new cable-television guides, tailored to the systems they serve, have emerged as competition for the Radnor magazine. The leader, Cable Guide, published in Horsham, was named the hottest magazine of 1987 by Adweek after its ad revenues soared by almost 70 percent. Then there is the new cooperative advertising venture involving the Sunday television supplements of 33 major U.S. newspapers, including The Inquirer.
BUSINESS
November 24, 1991 | By Julia M. Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Anthea Disney was tapped two months ago by Australian media magnate Rupert Murdoch to edit TV Guide, she faced an immediate challenge: She had to start watching TV. "The trouble was, the sort of life I always led . . . I've always been either on the road . . . or working till all hours," said Disney, 46, a former Fleet Street reporter and most recently executive producer of A Current Affair, a nationally syndicated television show....
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NEWS
December 5, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Irvin J. Borowsky, 90, of Philadelphia, a television-industry visionary, publisher, and philanthropist, died Tuesday, Nov. 25, of causes related to aging at his home. In 1948, Mr. Borowsky started TV Digest, a magazine that listed programs for the 50,000 area residents who at that time had TV sets. He built up the paid circulation to over 300,000 and extended a contract to Channel 6 guaranteeing that if it showed movies - a rarity on TV then - the publication would purchase advertising time on them.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Blind Comcast Corp. TV executive Tom Wlodkowski says the company's talking TV guide for the visually impaired will go live on the nation's largest cable TV system by Dec. 1. The talking guide, still in its beta phase, can be accessed by Xfinity subscribers on the company's X1 set-top boxes. There are five million X1 set-top boxes in American homes, and Comcast is switching out older boxes for X1s throughout its cable TV franchise areas. Of about 22 million Xfinity TV subscribers, 600,000 to 700,000 could be classified as blind or visually impaired, based on national statistics.
NEWS
April 16, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Herbert W. Rickards Jr., 97, of North Cape May, a former printer for TV Guide and The Inquirer, died Thursday, April 10, at his home. A graduate of West Philadelphia High School, Mr. Rickards studied mechanical engineering at Drexel University and worked at a Delaware River refinery of Sinclair Oil before World War II. For the Army Air Corps, he worked as a B-17 bomber mechanic at bases in England and returned to work for Sinclair, stepdaughter Diane...
NEWS
February 27, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
INVARIABLY, when some old friend called Al Williams, it wasn't "How are you, Al?" It was, "How's your mom?" It wasn't that old pals weren't interested in Al's condition; it was just that his mother, Anna Williams, was a special person known to a wide variety of people from all walks of life and professions. There was something about Anna that drew people to her - and once a friend, always a friend. "If you met her, she'd get personal with you right away," said her son Alford J. Williams.
BUSINESS
August 29, 2013 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
How does a blind person find what to "watch" on a TV with 200 channels and 46,000 video-on-demand choices of movies, shows, and clips? Tom Wlodkowski, a blind executive at Comcast Corp., thinks he has the answer: a talking TV channel guide. No joke. "The television is not strictly as visual a medium as you might think," said David Goldfield, a computer technology instructor at the Associated Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired. "Radio drama in the U.S. is more or less dead.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2013
EVEN a year later, former game-show host Marc Summers can't explain the manic excitement that exploded over three wild nights during Philly Beer Week 2012. It was the return of his 1980s children's game show, "Double Dare. " Only, in the spirit of the festive week, the live show was called "Dunkel Dare. " The contestants were brewers, and the trivia questions and physical challenges related to beer. The crowd lined up for hours and rollicked inside as Summers gulped suds and dropped the f-bomb.
NEWS
February 5, 2013 | By Miriam Hill, Inquirer Staff Writer
Helen Vitkow Guggino, 96, who began her career as a copy girl at The Inquirer and eventually became the paper's radio and television editor, died of heart failure Friday, Jan. 4, at Hampton Care Center in Southampton. When she was in her 60s, Mrs. Guggino embarked on a career in fashion design, creating dresses that drew a following among Philadelphians seeking simple but elegant frocks, said her son, Jhon Christopher. Bold and witty, she spoke her mind. When people asked what she earned at The Inquirer years ago, she answered, "Not enough.
NEWS
September 29, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
William A. McIlwain, 83, of Malvern, a retired advertising executive, died of heart failure Thursday, Sept. 20, at Neighborhood Hospice in West Chester. In 1967, Mr. McIlwain, who had been with agencies in New York City for several years, joined N.W. Ayer & Son, an advertising agency in Philadelphia. When the company moved to New York, he commuted from his home. He continued to commute after he joined Grey Advertising in 1972. His son-in-law, Douglas Tietbohl, said he had a regular table at Runyon's, a Manhattan restaurant frequented by sports and entertainment celebrities.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2012 | Ellen Gray
"Twitter is the new water cooler, folks — if you come to get a drink, you're gonna hear people talking about last night's TV. " —"Lost" co-creator Damon Lindelof to his more than 176,000 followers on Twitter.   THE LATE Dr. Samuel Johnson, who said that "no one but a blockhead ever wrote except for money," couldn't have anticipated Twitter, much less that more than two centuries after his death, a Twitter handle in his honor, @DrSamuelJohnson , would have more than 40,000 followers.
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