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Tv Nation

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NEWS
July 23, 1995 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
So here it was, another sweltering Saturday in Philadelphia, and more than 100 sweaty people were outside on hot concrete, chanting "Crackers! Crackers! Crackers!" as they followed an even sweatier guy in an 8-foot chicken suit to the bank. Why? you wonder. Did we mention there was a TV camera with the chicken? This was TV Nation at work, in Center City to use the power of television to ferret out corporate wrongdoers and, in the process, encourage a bunch of everyday folks to do some pretty silly stuff.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1994 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
Tonight's new show on NBC is called TV Nation, but, somehow, the name Alien Nation just keeps inserting itself into my brain. Alien Nation is the old Fox sci-fi show, based on the 1988 movie, about bald extraterrestrials with stripes on their heads who landed, several hundred thousand strong, and sort of joined up with the human race. You remember, the show where the man had the baby? (This fall, Fox plans a made-for-TV movie reprise of Alien Nation - just what we all need.
LIVING
April 7, 1999 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Writer/director/provocateur Michael Moore's latest project wasn't born out of rage at rampant capitalism, or fury over life's inequities, or a burning desire to uplift the common man. Instead, The Awful Truth, which debuts at 9 p.m. Sunday on Bravo, came about because the guerrilla filmmaker couldn't find a sitcom that he liked. True story: The man who got famous for Roger & Me, the documentary of his quest to meet with General Motors chairman Roger Smith and hold him accountable for the devastation he'd wrought on Moore's Michigan hometown, is a happy couch potato, just like the rest of us. "The honest answer - I love TV!"
NEWS
January 16, 1995 | by Mark de la Vina, Daily News Staff Writer
If Michael Moore wanted to a cause less of a ruckus at the TV critics tour, he could have dumped jalapeno dip onto everyone's lap. The executive producer of "TV Nation" on NBC told television critics about a piece he produced for a special in December that showed radical anti- abortionists advocating the assassination of President Clinton and members of the Supreme Court. "The people in advertising did not feel that they had enough time to try and find the right advertisers," Moore said.
NEWS
July 19, 1994 | by Mark de la Vina, Daily News Staff Writer
Glance at today's television listings and there it is, competing against such seasoned vets as "Full House" and "Rescue 911. " "TV Nation," filmmaker Michael Moore's first foray into network television, is scheduled to air at 8 tonight on KYW-TV (Channel 3). However, the staff of the hilarious, skew-on-sight newsmagazine feels a tad uneasy about NBC's plans to run a show that takes a shot at General Electric, the parent company of NBC. "There are people in the office who don't believe it will air until they actually sit in front of the TV on the 19th and see it," Moore said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1997 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
One of the summer's major blockbusters tops a quiet week in new home video releases. The Lost World: Jurassic Park 1/2 (1997) (Universal) $22.98. 129 minutes. Jeff Goldblum, Julianne Moore, Pete Postlethwaite, Richard Attenborough. A cautionary tale as colossal, scaly and predatory as a T. rex, The Lost World is a B-minus monster movie with A-plus production values. Except for the witty Goldblum, director Steven Spielberg's film lacks the human scale and interaction that made Jaws and E.T. as special for their stories as for their special effects.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2004 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services and Wireless Flash contributed to this report
THE SUMMER movie season got a lot hotter last night. That's when word arrived that Michael Moore's controversial "Fahrenheit 9/11" will hit theaters - June 25. Distribution is being handled by Harvey and Bob Weinstein's newly formed Fellowship Adventure Group - which purchased rights to the film from Disney last week - in conjunction with Lions Gate Films and IFC Films. Pay TV rights will be handled by Showtime, Lions Gate's Pay TV partner. "With Frodo [Harvey] and Sam [Bob]
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2011 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Columnist
I feel your pain, TV nation. It's not enough that every show is seemingly required either to reference the Kardashians or to include a cameo by one of them. No, it appears that every show is also designed to appeal to them, i.e., twentysomethings. (That's both an age and an IQ bracket, as in "Yo, Mikey, you was so drunk last night. ") "Why don't they make any series that cater to me?" you might well ask. I'll tell you why: Because they take you for granted. We hear over and over again that the only audience TV programmers are interested in is 18-to-49- year-olds (a group usually referred to in ratings stories as "all-important")
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1998 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
If you judge a man by those who fear him, then Michael Moore is wicked powerful. To whisper the name of the guerrilla filmmaker in the corridors of corporate America is to hear executives howl in terror. Moore's target is corporate greed, and with Roger & Me, his 1989 documentary about how General Motors fiddled around moving plants to Mexico while Flint, Mich., got burned, Moore struck a bull's-eye. A man for all media with the Emmy-winning TV Nation and the bestseller Downsize This!
LIVING
September 5, 1995 | By Lini S. Kadaba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Debbie Nigro's life is a whirlwind of bounced checks, parking tickets (unpaid), crises (7 1/2-year-old daughter), guilt (7 1/2-year-old daughter), diets, black clothes (to look slimmer), face stuff (to look younger), romance (right!), bad hair days and, oh yes, a job (radio talk-show host and, in her spare time, ha-ha, author and workout star.) Obviously, Nigro is the quintessential working mom on the run. That explains the popularity of her 2 1/2-year-old nationwide radio show on Saturday mornings called The Working Mom on the Run (a.k.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2011 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Columnist
I feel your pain, TV nation. It's not enough that every show is seemingly required either to reference the Kardashians or to include a cameo by one of them. No, it appears that every show is also designed to appeal to them, i.e., twentysomethings. (That's both an age and an IQ bracket, as in "Yo, Mikey, you was so drunk last night. ") "Why don't they make any series that cater to me?" you might well ask. I'll tell you why: Because they take you for granted. We hear over and over again that the only audience TV programmers are interested in is 18-to-49- year-olds (a group usually referred to in ratings stories as "all-important")
NEWS
May 5, 2005 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. and Nathan Gorenstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The Philadelphia police officer seen in a TV news video striking a civilian after a car chase - at least once while he was handcuffed - was identified yesterday by department sources as Michael Collins, a 14-year veteran. The civilian, who in the WCAU-TV (Channel 10) news video is seen being struck eight times by the officer, was identified as Charles Baum, 30, of Kensington. Both men were named by Police Department sources who did not want to be identified because the police have refused to officially release the identity of either man. However, the sources said Collins had been placed on desk duty pending an investigation into the incident.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2004 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services and Wireless Flash contributed to this report
THE SUMMER movie season got a lot hotter last night. That's when word arrived that Michael Moore's controversial "Fahrenheit 9/11" will hit theaters - June 25. Distribution is being handled by Harvey and Bob Weinstein's newly formed Fellowship Adventure Group - which purchased rights to the film from Disney last week - in conjunction with Lions Gate Films and IFC Films. Pay TV rights will be handled by Showtime, Lions Gate's Pay TV partner. "With Frodo [Harvey] and Sam [Bob]
SPORTS
January 14, 2003 | By Larry Eichel INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Eagles' victory over the Atlanta Falcons on Saturday night was a big hit in the local television ratings, as you might have expected. But nationally, it turned out to be a bit of a dud. In the Philadelphia media market, the divisional playoff game drew a 42.1 rating and a 58 percent share, according to the folks at Fox's WTXF-TV (Channel 29). That means that people in 42.1 percent of area households with TVs were watching the game, and 58 percent of the TVs in use were tuned in. Those numbers are almost precisely the same as were recorded for the Eagles last year when they beat the Chicago Bears at the comparable stage of the NFL playoffs.
LIVING
April 7, 1999 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Writer/director/provocateur Michael Moore's latest project wasn't born out of rage at rampant capitalism, or fury over life's inequities, or a burning desire to uplift the common man. Instead, The Awful Truth, which debuts at 9 p.m. Sunday on Bravo, came about because the guerrilla filmmaker couldn't find a sitcom that he liked. True story: The man who got famous for Roger & Me, the documentary of his quest to meet with General Motors chairman Roger Smith and hold him accountable for the devastation he'd wrought on Moore's Michigan hometown, is a happy couch potato, just like the rest of us. "The honest answer - I love TV!"
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1998 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
If you judge a man by those who fear him, then Michael Moore is wicked powerful. To whisper the name of the guerrilla filmmaker in the corridors of corporate America is to hear executives howl in terror. Moore's target is corporate greed, and with Roger & Me, his 1989 documentary about how General Motors fiddled around moving plants to Mexico while Flint, Mich., got burned, Moore struck a bull's-eye. A man for all media with the Emmy-winning TV Nation and the bestseller Downsize This!
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1997 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
One of the summer's major blockbusters tops a quiet week in new home video releases. The Lost World: Jurassic Park 1/2 (1997) (Universal) $22.98. 129 minutes. Jeff Goldblum, Julianne Moore, Pete Postlethwaite, Richard Attenborough. A cautionary tale as colossal, scaly and predatory as a T. rex, The Lost World is a B-minus monster movie with A-plus production values. Except for the witty Goldblum, director Steven Spielberg's film lacks the human scale and interaction that made Jaws and E.T. as special for their stories as for their special effects.
NEWS
April 16, 1996 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nohle Mohapi sat erect and dignified yesterday as she recalled the upwelling of disbelief she felt on the night the police said her husband had committed suicide in his jail cell. She said she doubted that her husband, Mapetla, a 29-year-old father of two and the leader of a black students' organization, would hang himself with a pair of blue jeans. "I said spontaneously, 'No, it's not Mapetla.' " When she went to the jail to investigate that night in 1976, a black policeman laughed at her. "I'll never forget it. He said to me, 'They call themselves leaders, and yet they can't take the pressure themselves.
LIVING
September 5, 1995 | By Lini S. Kadaba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Debbie Nigro's life is a whirlwind of bounced checks, parking tickets (unpaid), crises (7 1/2-year-old daughter), guilt (7 1/2-year-old daughter), diets, black clothes (to look slimmer), face stuff (to look younger), romance (right!), bad hair days and, oh yes, a job (radio talk-show host and, in her spare time, ha-ha, author and workout star.) Obviously, Nigro is the quintessential working mom on the run. That explains the popularity of her 2 1/2-year-old nationwide radio show on Saturday mornings called The Working Mom on the Run (a.k.
NEWS
July 23, 1995 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
So here it was, another sweltering Saturday in Philadelphia, and more than 100 sweaty people were outside on hot concrete, chanting "Crackers! Crackers! Crackers!" as they followed an even sweatier guy in an 8-foot chicken suit to the bank. Why? you wonder. Did we mention there was a TV camera with the chicken? This was TV Nation at work, in Center City to use the power of television to ferret out corporate wrongdoers and, in the process, encourage a bunch of everyday folks to do some pretty silly stuff.
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