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Tween

NEWS
September 8, 2000 | By Al Haas, INQUIRER AUTOMOTIVE WRITER
The U.S. car bazaar is a mature market. There isn't a whole lot of room for growth in its conventional segments, such as family cars and compact pickups. So, increasingly, the name of the game is picking up incremental sales through niche marketing. Provide a new kind of car or truck that fills an unmet need. Give people something they didn't know they wanted until they saw it. The Dodge Durango sport-utility vehicle is such a critter. Uniquely sized between midsize and full-size sport-utes, it addresses the hauling needs of people who want more room than you get in a midsizer such as the Jeep Grand Cherokee, but don't need the space - and added expense - found in a full-size ute such as the Ford Expedition.
NEWS
August 29, 2007 | By Dean P. Johnson
I was one of three fathers leaning on a circular rack of bubble skirts with crochet trim, on sale, buy one get the other at half-price. We were standing near the fitting rooms of a high-fashion designer mall store for that special tween girl ? 8 to 12 years old ? whose fashion sense leaves dad with little more than a few cents in his pocket. We were waiting for our daughters, who were trying on everything but the discount rack. Dozens of pre-teens zigzagged from display rack to display rack with mothers yelling for their little darlings to hold still long enough to hold a shirt up to the shoulders to see whether it was worth taking to the fitting room.
NEWS
July 8, 1993 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
If you watch closely, the low-lying figure in front of the television will move. It will lumber to the refrigerator and make periodic withdrawals. It will pounce on the telephone before the first brrrring is brrrrung. It will utter phrases intelligible only to the American parent: "Do I hafta?" "But I don't wanna. " "Only nerds do that. " Then it assumes the position again - the prone position. It is the 11- to 13-year-old. In the summer, it is not always a pretty picture.
NEWS
June 20, 2005 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's tough to make TV shows for tweens (9-to-14-year-olds). They're such a narrow target that it's easy to miss to one side or the other, with material that's too juvenile or too mature. One thing you absolutely don't want to do with this group is bore them - a sin that two new series commit. Wildfire on ABC Family Channel is the story of a girl and a horse. With a felonious twist. Newcomer Genevieve Cortese plays a tough inner-city girl who acquires equestrian skills during a jolt in a youth correctional facility.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2012 | By CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer
IT COULD HAVE been a scene from any of the past six decades: Contemporary, beat-heavy music blares over a sound system while dozens of Delaware Valley young people shimmy and shake, their movements captured by cameras for a TV audience. This tableau, which unfolded on an early spring morning in the Play 2 Video Arcade at Chickie's & Pete's near the South Philly sports complex, was part of the taping of an episode of "Party Rockers Tween Scene. " The dance party airs at 11 a.m. Saturdays on NBC Philadelphia Nonstop (Comcast 248, Verizon Fios 460, over-the-air 10.2)
LIVING
October 21, 2009 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The grand ballroom at the Capital Hilton glowed neon purple, and Idol-er David Archuleta's "Crush" pulsed from giant speakers. Less than a mile from the White House, the First National Tween Girl Summit - yes, summit - was under way. The event was part serious confab, part sparkly hearts and butterflies - just like its audience. That would be those conflicted wannabe teens (but not quite there yet) - the 8- to 12-year-olds known as tweens. On this recent Saturday, 250 girls came from across the country, including the Philadelphia region, to speak out on issues that mattered most to them.
LIVING
August 19, 2000 | By Lucia Herndon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Your children of middle-school age are finished with summer camp and they're bored! Bored! Bored! How can you end the whining and keep them from sitting mindlessly in front of the television set until school starts? Give them a book. Better yet, buy the first book in the "Series of Unfortunate Events" and just set it on the breakfast table. Let them discover it. Let's face it; even counting Harry Potter, there's a dearth of good books for children in middle school. But this series of five books and counting is custom-made for the age. Written with tongue planted firmly in cheek, the books feature bright, inventive kids who are smarter than every adult they encounter.
BUSINESS
December 22, 2005 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
En route to dressing room, Lily Feingold and Brittany Garrison, both 11, barely glanced at the nearly nude mannequin in her red tasseled bra and high-cut panties at Victoria's Secret - one of their favorite stores. "We don't use that," Brittany said, nodding toward the bra. Neither Lily nor Brittany would have much use for any of Victoria Secret's bras, actually. "They're still outwardly mobile," joked Lily's mother, Suzanne Bonsall Feingold. Marketing experts call Lily and Brittany's yearnings "aspirational," and that aspiration may explain why the girls and many of their friends are regular Victoria's Secret customers, despite their tender age. The company says it is absolutely not marketing to this young a customer.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2006 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The teen years are notoriously turbulent, rife with stresses real and imagined. But at least you get more interesting television than your younger siblings do, as two new cable series demonstrate. Falcon Beach (Mondays at 9 p.m. on ABC Family) features a bevy of young adults at a summer resort in New England who are dealing with romance, jealousy, beach parties, wigged-out parents, local cops - the whole soapy broth. Beyond the Break (Fridays at 8 p.m. on the N channel) focuses on four young women, aspiring pro surfers who live in a communal house in Oahu with a salty surfing vet (David Chokachi of Baywatch)
NEWS
March 21, 2004 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Deodorant, body wash, shampoo and hair gel, made especially for tween and teen boys, ages 9 to 16. Gimmick merchandising or societal need? A good question, depending on which side of the boys' grooming issue you stand. (Or, on how far from the boys you are standing.) "It would be a definite for them," Carrie Ford of Frankford said of her three boys, ages 8, 9 and 15. "They wouldn't have to tell their friends they put on baby powder. They don't like saying Suave. " Which may be auspicious news for Procter & Gamble, which has just launched OT, a line of grooming products for young men. Very young men. In the world of beauty, men's products barely register - $60 million out of $2 billion in high-end skin-care sales in department stores last year, according to New York-based NPD Market Research.
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