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Twister

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NEWS
May 20, 1996 | by Ellen Gray, Daily News Staff Writer
Call it a twister of fate. A search for some local TV weather forecasters to talk about the movie "Twister" last week turned up two who'd actually lived in houses hit by tornadoes. Not only do they work at the same station, WTXF (Channel 29), but their eight-letter last names both begin with C and end with O. (Where's Fox Mulder when you really need him?) Ask "Good Day, Philadelphia" weather forecaster Jim Castillo when he first decided to become a meteorologist and he'll tell you: "April 8, 1980.
NEWS
November 17, 1989 | By Linda S. Wallace, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Wednesday neared, Ed Ferguson and his co-workers at the National Severe Storms Forecast Center in Kansas City chatted quietly about the odds that a deadly tornado would strike on Nov. 15 for the third year in a row. For 30 years, the nation had averaged only two tornado fatalities in November, but on Nov. 15 of both 1987 and 1988, violent tornadoes skipped across the Southwest and Midwest. Seven in Arkansas and Missouri died in 1988, and 11 in Texas and Louisiana died in 1987.
NEWS
July 13, 2013
Charles Foley, 82, whose Twister game launched decades of awkward social interactions at parties, died July 1 at a care facility in the Minneapolis suburb of St. Louis Park. Son Mark said Thursday that his father had Alzheimer's disease. Mr. Foley and a collaborator, Neil Rabens, were hired in the mid-1960s by a St. Paul, Minn., manufacturing firm that wanted to expand into games and toys. They came up with a game to be played on a mat, using a spinner to direct players to place their hands and feet on different-color circles.
NEWS
May 24, 2011 | By Alan Scher Zagier and Jim Salter, Associated Press
JOPLIN, Mo. - Rescue crews dug through piles of splintered houses and crushed cars Monday searching for victims of a tornado that blasted much of this Missouri town off the map and left at least 116 people dead. It was the deadliest single twister in nearly 60 years and the second tornado disaster in less than a month. As the full scope of Sunday's calamity came into view - houses reduced to slabs, cars crushed like soda cans, shaken residents roaming the streets in search of missing family members - authorities feared the toll would rise.
NEWS
June 11, 2011 | By Jim Suhr and Bill Draper, Associated Press
JOPLIN, Mo. - In the aftermath of the Joplin tornado, some people injured in the storm developed a rare and sometimes fatal fungal infection so aggressive that it turned their tissue black and caused mold to grow inside their wounds. Scientists say the unusually aggressive infection occurs when dirt or vegetation becomes embedded under the skin. In some cases, injuries that had been stitched up had to be reopened to clean out the contamination. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday that it was conducting tests to help investigate the infections, which are so uncommon that even the nation's largest hospitals might see only one or two cases a year.
SPORTS
March 16, 2008 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
In some ways, the Georgia Dome was lucky Friday night. If Alabama's Mykal Riley hadn't hit a three-point shot at the buzzer to tie the score and send the Southeastern Conference tournament game with Mississippi State into overtime, fans would have spilled into the streets and into a tornado's wrath. When it hit with the roar of a train at 9:48 p.m., the twister rattled and tore through the cable-supported fabric roof, ripping up sections of the arena, causing monitors and scaffolding to sway and spooking fans.
NEWS
August 18, 1994 | By Michelle Conlin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A letter carrier's truck trolls the Hamlet each day, traveling Victory Way, past mailboxes missing houses and houses missing mailboxes. Before the tornado struck July 27, killing a man, a woman and their baby, and causing $3 million worth of damage, the Hamlet was filled with busy families settling into brand-new houses. Residents swapped recipes for their monthly supper club and congregated at curbsides to visit and sip cold beers. There were boisterous block parties, festive luaus, and lots of children riding squeaky bicycles.
NEWS
May 3, 2011 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While the ground surveys are continuing, what investigators have found so far is almost unimaginable. Their preliminary findings affirm that last week's tornado outbreak was one of the most monstrous atmospheric events in the nation's history. At least one was EF-5 - the highest designation on the Enhanced Fujita scale - with winds of at least 200 m.p.h. - has been verified. A twister that held together for more than 80 miles from Tuscaloosa, Ala., to Birmingham killed 65 people.
NEWS
August 18, 1994 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
The tornado jitters hit the area again yesterday. But by late last night, the National Weather Service canceled a tornado watch for much of Eastern Pennsylvania. No tornado sightings had been reported, a Weather Service spokesman said. The watch was issued because of muggy, unstable weather left behind in its passage by Beryl, the second tropical storm to hit the U.S. coastline this season. The storm also dumped about an inch of rain at Philadelphia International Airport. Tornado spotters were especially alert in the Philadelphia area because three relatively mild twisters occurred over last weekend - two in Chester County on Saturday, and another in Upper Merion on Sunday.
NEWS
August 31, 1990 | By Andrew Cassel, Inquirer Staff Writer
American flags sprouted in the rubble of Peerless Estates yesterday, incongruous but proud symbols of people determined to rebuild their homes and lives after Tuesday's killer tornadoes. From walls without roofs, from doors without walls, from piles of paneling and sheetrock where not even a door remained, flags of all sizes had been hung across the devastated acres, turning the constant parade of dump trucks, bulldozers and emergency vehicles into a kind of mock-July Fourth spectacle.
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NEWS
August 15, 2013 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
Update : The National Weather Service has confirmed that an EF 0 scale tornado (winds 65 to 85 m.p.h.) touched down in the Manahawkin section of Stafford Township, Ocean County on Tuesday. Earlier story: treets from Coatesville to Ship Bottom went Venetian, flash flooding was ubiquitous, and "rush hour" became even more of an oxymoron than usual. On Tuesday morning, the soggiest summer on record added dramatic twists to its growing legacy, with potent storms that took down trees, closed roads, and put the brakes on mass transit at the height of the morning commute.
NEWS
July 13, 2013
Charles Foley, 82, whose Twister game launched decades of awkward social interactions at parties, died July 1 at a care facility in the Minneapolis suburb of St. Louis Park. Son Mark said Thursday that his father had Alzheimer's disease. Mr. Foley and a collaborator, Neil Rabens, were hired in the mid-1960s by a St. Paul, Minn., manufacturing firm that wanted to expand into games and toys. They came up with a game to be played on a mat, using a spinner to direct players to place their hands and feet on different-color circles.
NEWS
June 5, 2013
Tornado widest ever in the U.S. A tornado that swept through Oklahoma on Friday was the widest tornado in American history, the National Weather Service said Tuesday. The El Reno, Okla., tornado scraped out a damage path up to 2.6 miles wide and 16.2 miles long, a swath at points wider and longer than Manhattan. The storm broke the record held by a 2.5-mile-wide Hallam, Neb., twister in 2004. The human aftermath left by Friday's twister was painfully apparent, with at least 18 people killed in the latest massive tornado to carve through Oklahoma this spring.
NEWS
June 2, 2013 | By Sean Murphy, Associated Press
OKLAHOMA CITY - It's a warning as familiar as a daily prayer for Tornado Alley residents: When a twister approaches, take shelter in a basement or low-level interior room or closet, away from windows and exterior walls. But with the powerful devastation from the May 20 twister that killed 24 and pummeled the Oklahoma City suburb of Moore still etched in their minds, many Oklahomans instead opted to flee Friday night when a violent tornado developed and headed toward the state's capital city.
NEWS
May 23, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
MOORE, Okla. - The tornado that struck an Oklahoma City suburb this week may have created $2 billion or more in damage as it tore through as many as 13,000 homes, multiple schools and a hospital, officials said yesterday as they gave the first detailed account of the devastation. At the same time, authorities released the identities of some of the 24 people, including 10 children, who died. Authorities have also now accounted for the last six people - all of them adults - who were believed to still be missing.
NEWS
May 22, 2013 | By Tim Talley, Associated Press
MOORE, Okla. - A monstrous tornado at least a half-mile wide roared through the Oklahoma City suburbs Monday, flattening entire neighborhoods and destroying an elementary school with a direct blow as children and teachers huddled against winds up to 200 m.p.h. At least 51 people were killed, and officials said the death toll was expected to rise. The storm laid waste to scores of buildings in Moore, a community of 41,000 people about 10 miles south of the city. Block after block lay in ruins.
NEWS
May 21, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - Yesterday's powerful tornado in suburban Oklahoma City loosely followed the path of a killer twister that slammed the region in May 1999. The 1999 storm had winds clocked at 300 mph, according to the weather service website, and it destroyed or damaged more than 8,000 homes, killing at least two people. Kelsey Angle, a National Weather Service meteorologist in Kansas City, Mo., said it's unusual for two such powerful tornadoes to track roughly the same path. The 1999 twister was part of a two-day outbreak sweeping mostly across central Oklahoma - similar to the past two days.
NEWS
December 27, 2012 | By Janet McConnaughey, Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS - Christmas Day along the Gulf Coast was filled with severe thunderstorms that brought drenching rains, high winds, and damaging tornadoes, while the nation's midsection dealt with freezing rain, sleet, and snow that made for a sloppy, sometimes dangerous trek for holiday travelers. Winds toppled a tree onto a pickup truck in the Houston area, killing the driver. Icy roads were blamed for a 21-vehicle pileup in Oklahoma, where authorities warned would-be travelers to stay home.
NEWS
September 2, 2012 | By Kevin Mcgill, Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS - As the remnants of Hurricane Isaac pushed their way up the Mississippi valley on Saturday, spinning off severe thunderstorms and at least four tornadoes, some on the Gulf Coast were impatient with the pace of restoring power days after the storm dragged through the state. While New Orleans streets were bustling again and workers were returning to offshore oil rigs, thousands of evacuees couldn't return home to flooded low-lying areas of Louisiana and more than 400,000 sweltering electricity customers in the state remained without power.
NEWS
May 22, 2012 | By Julie Pace and Alan Scher Zagier, Associated Press
JOPLIN, Mo. - One year after a deadly tornado devastated their city, President Obama praised the residents of Joplin, Mo., for a spirit of perseverance and resiliency that he said could serve as a model for a nation still grinding its way through tough economic times. Obama delivered a high school commencement address a day before the anniversary of the twister that killed 161 people. Declaring that they had "already defied the odds," he urged the graduating seniors of Joplin High School to hold close the lessons they learned in overcoming adversity as they enter the next phase of their lives.
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