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NEWS
September 26, 1986 | By KATHY SHEEHAN, Daily News Staff Writer
It's midafternoon at SEPTA's Allegheny depot in Swampoodle and all of the bus drivers taking a break in a clean, air-conditioned lounge are discussing their new pension plan. Is it better than what they had before? "Come back Friday," several say, referring to today, the day they get to answer that question in the form of electing union officers. Roger Tauss, the Transport Workers Union president who led a four-day strike last March for better pensions and less harassment from management, is facing a re-election challenge today from longtime union activist Joe Bebco.
NEWS
November 8, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Members of Transport Workers Union Local 234 on Friday ratified a two-year contract with SEPTA that will provide a 5 percent pay raise over that span. The sides reached a tentative agreement late last week after the union threatened to strike. The union represents 5,000 bus drivers, subway and trolley operators, cashiers, and mechanics. The two-year deal allowed both sides to postpone decisions on pension and health-care issues. The terms are expected to set the pattern for other unions representing SEPTA employees.
NEWS
March 27, 1998 | by Dave Davies and Scott Flander, Daily News Staff Writers
First, the headlines: No SEPTA strike today, but no settlement, either. Now, for the news, such as it is, behind the headlines: Negotiators for SEPTA and the Transport Workers Union went before City Council, in separate appearances, and took potshots at each other. Later, union officials walked over to a rally in front of SEPTA headquarters, at 12th and Market streets, where several hundred union members and others were gathered. After labor leaders and politicians addressed the crowd, TWU president Steve Brookens led a boisterous chant addressed to the mayor, who has taken SEPTA's side in the dispute.
NEWS
October 10, 1998 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
You had to figure that if the SEPTA labor dispute didn't get resolved, City Council would weigh in eventually. Eventually is now. Council unanimously passed a toughly-worded, pro-union resolution this week that threatens to withhold the city's $59 million annual SEPTA subsidy, unless the board ratifies the contract the Transport Workers Union said it agreed to. It's unlikely the move will really cost SEPTA any money. If the dispute goes on for months though, Council is in a position to exert some pressure on the authority.
NEWS
April 5, 1995 | BY HARRY LOMBARDO
Transport Workers Union Local 234 members who read your March 31 editorial, "Cops choose sides in transit strike," were shocked and dismayed to see an opinion piece in Philadelphia's "working class newspaper" sound a false alarm over a gesture of solidarity and goodwill between the Fraternal Order of Police and the TWU. Those who don't know better might conclude that TWU's strike against SEPTA involved an act of insurrection and that the police...
NEWS
June 10, 1987 | By FRANK DOUGHERTY, Daily News Staff Writer
Transport Workers Union president Roger Tauss thinks state Auditor General Don Bailey should stop auditing SEPTA and resume what Tauss claims Bailey does best. "We respectively suggest Mr. Bailey return to other activities he has more of a bent for, like criticizing war movies," charged Tauss, referring to Bailey's criticism of the movie "Platoon. " Bailey, a Vietnam War veteran, feels "Platoon" gives viewers a distorted view of American servicemen who fought in Southeast Asia.
NEWS
June 5, 1998 | By Bruce Bodner
The Transport Workers Union regrets the inconvenience our strike is causing riders. It was because of the riders that we spent the past five months doing everything possible to avert a strike. Unfortunately, SEPTA made a peaceful settlement impossible. The TWU came to the table with reasonable contract proposals. We demonstrated a willingness to change our labor agreement in order to address legitimate issues important to the Authority and the riding public. We bargained in good faith, making compromises on wage and pension increases for our members.
NEWS
March 29, 1986 | By CYNTHIA BURTON, Daily News Staff Writer
The 5,000 members of Transport Workers Union Local 234, which struck SEPTA for four days this month, are to vote Friday on their contract with the transit authority. A ratification vote had been planned for yesterday but was postponed because of the Easter holiday. Votes will be cast at the depots and yards where union maintenance employees and drivers work and tallied at TWU headquarters. Local 234, whose four-day strike, one of the shortest in SEPTA history, ended March 20, settled for a $1.12 raise over three years, an improved pension plan and a guarantee that the loser in an arbitration case would pay fees.
NEWS
July 25, 1998 | by Julie Knipe Brown, Daily News Staff Writer
Members of the Transport Workers Union yesterday ratified a three-year contract with SEPTA by almost a 3-to-1 vote. The pact was ratified even though there is no formal written agreement and both the union and SEPTA management continue to bicker over two key issues. The two critical provisions - the hiring of part-time drivers and changes to health and pension benefits for employees on worker's compensation - have yet to be ironed out. The unresolved issues and the lack of a signed agreement left some rank-and-file members feeling unsettled as they cast their votes yesterday.
NEWS
September 27, 1986 | By KATHY SHEEHAN, Daily News Staff Writer
Roger Tauss rode a landslide victory to another term as leader of 5,300 SEPTA workers last night in a solid reaffirmation of the contract he won for bus drivers, mechanics and cashiers last March. Without counting challenged ballots and split-ticket votes, Tauss had garnered 2,271 votes to 407 cast for challenger Joe Bebco. It was the first time a president of the Transport Workers Union Local 274 won re-election since 1971. Tauss credited his win to his success in restoring dignity to the jobs held by the rank and file.
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NEWS
November 8, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Members of Transport Workers Union Local 234 on Friday ratified a two-year contract with SEPTA that will provide a 5 percent pay raise over that span. The sides reached a tentative agreement late last week after the union threatened to strike. The union represents 5,000 bus drivers, subway and trolley operators, cashiers, and mechanics. The two-year deal allowed both sides to postpone decisions on pension and health-care issues. The terms are expected to set the pattern for other unions representing SEPTA employees.
NEWS
November 2, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
AFTER DEBATING FOR hours, SEPTA and its largest union reached a tentative agreement on a months-long contract dispute. Sources close to the negotiations said the transit authority and Transport Workers Union Local 234 had signed a two-year labor contract late last night, avoiding a strike, though no further details were immediately available. Late last night, several SEPTA executives, including General Manager Joseph Casey and board chairman Pasquale Deon, joined the proceedings, signaling positive progress.
NEWS
October 29, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
ALTHOUGH SEPTA's largest union is meeting tomorrow to take a strike vote, a source said riders don't have to worry about the subway shutting down on Monday. But what happens after that is a different story. Transport Workers Union Local 234 - which represents nearly 5,000 bus drivers and subway and trolley operators - is in the midst of heated negotiations with the transit authority over health-care benefits and pensions, according to union officials. TWU's members have been working without a contract since the spring, when the union's previous agreement expired.
NEWS
October 29, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
REST ASSURED, commuters: If a contract dispute between SEPTA and its largest union turns sour, the city's train operators and bus and trolley drivers won't strike until next week. And if they do decide to strike, they'll give us all 24 hours' notice, according to Willie Brown, the president of Transport Workers Union Local 234. "My decision to strike is totally up to SEPTA," said Brown, who noted that, even after months of negotiations, the distance between his union and SEPTA on key matters, especially pensions, is as wide as the gap between "California and Pennsylvania.
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
No one wants a strike. "I often have no choice in the matter," said Willie Brown, 51, president of Transport Workers Local 234, the union representing SEPTA's bus drivers, subway operators, and trolley drivers. "I don't think it's a matter of if we strike," he said. "It's simply a matter of when, unfortunately. " On Sunday, union members moved a step closer to a strike, voting to allow Brown to call workers off the job - any time, and without warning. Question: You go on strike to gain benefits for workers, but do you worry that the people you are hurting most are the everyday working people who rely on transit to get to their jobs?
BUSINESS
October 5, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
There won't be a SEPTA rail strike on Oct. 13. But there might be one on Feb. 10. And that could coincide with a possible strike by bus, subway, and trolley workers, shutting down the entire SEPTA system. SEPTA officials said Friday that they will ask for a second 120-day presidential emergency board to mediate the Regional Rail labor dispute when the current board's term expires at 12:01 a.m. on Oct. 13, if no settlement is reached by then. Under the federal Railway Labor Act, that would compel locomotive engineers and SEPTA to continue to operate as normal until the end of the 120 days, on Feb. 10. SEPTA's 220 locomotive engineers and 215 railroad electrical workers went on a one-day strike on June 14, before President Obama appointed the first presidential board at Gov. Corbett's request.
BUSINESS
September 26, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
A SEPTA janitorial worker and the transit agency are fighting over the worker's dismissal for refusing to work on holy days, including Rosh Hashanah. Romel McAlpin of Germantown was fired last year by SEPTA for refusing to work on Rosh Hashanah and Oct. 12, his Sabbath. McAlpin, according to legal documents, is an adherent of the Israelite Church of God in Jesus Christ, a sect that observes Jewish holy days and marks the Sabbath from sundown Friday to sundown Saturday. McAlpin, a maintenance custodian in subway tunnels, notified SEPTA of his religious beliefs shortly after he was hired in May 2012, according to a legal brief filed by Transport Workers Union Local 234. SEPTA permitted McAlpin to trade days off with other workers to accommodate his beliefs, but only with workers with less seniority, citing seniority clauses in its union contract.
NEWS
June 11, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA moved Monday to impose management's terms in a long-running labor dispute with Regional Rail workers, which union leaders said could prompt a strike that would halt all commuter rail service at 12:01 a.m. Saturday. SEPTA's goal apparently is to risk a strike now, when ridership is lower, than next winter, when more commuters and students rely on the system. Regional Rail trains carry about 126,000 riders a day. "We need to get an agreement now," SEPTA general manager Joseph Casey said Monday.
NEWS
April 10, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Transit union negotiators will not resume talks with SEPTA until it provides extensive documentation on health-insurance and pension costs, Transport Workers Union Local 234 president Willie Brown said Tuesday. But Brown said a strike by transit workers "is not in my immediate future. " Union leaders have not called for a strike-authorization vote. "As long as we get some movement, we're going to negotiate," he said. In a phone conversation with reporters Tuesday, Brown blasted SEPTA for paying much higher pensions to managers than to union workers, calling it a "clash of the classes.
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA's biggest labor contract expires Friday night, but an immediate strike by Philadelphia bus drivers, subway and trolley operators, and maintenance workers seems unlikely. Negotiations between SEPTA and union representatives continued Wednesday at the Sheraton Philadelphia Downtown Hotel. The contract with Transport Workers Union Local 234 covers about 4,700 SEPTA employees in the city, roughly half of all the transit agency's workers. Separate contracts expire next month with TWU 234, Suburban Transit Division, Victory District, which represents about 160 suburban maintenance and clerical employees; and TWU 234, Suburban Transit Division, Frontier District, which represents about 230 bus drivers and mechanics in Montgomery and Bucks Counties.
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