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Ty Cobb

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January 13, 1995 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
With his thigh-high slide made more fearsome by lovingly sharpened spikes, Ty Cobb ran the bases like a man being chased by the devil himself. Ron Shelton's Cobb ponders its aging anti-hero at death's door when the baseball legend did not have to look back to know who was finally gaining on him. Shelton's film is, in every sense, the antithesis of the standard Hollywood sports biography. Call it Raging Ball, for this is a powerful essay in rage and the corrosion of the spirit. It is a picture that suggests the unrelenting will and drive that created a magnificent athlete on the field turned Cobb into a destructive hurricane away from the diamond.
SPORTS
January 1, 1995 | By Michael Bamberger, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
We live in an era when the word great has been debased, but Ty Cobb, Al Stump was saying here the other day, was truly great, the greatest baseball player of all time, greater even than Ruth. His career batting average - and this is only the simplest measure of Cobb's greatness - was .367. And in the final two years of his 24-year major- league career, playing for the Philadelphia Athletics in 1927 and 1928 at an age over 40, Cobb batted .357 and .323. In the process, he became a hero in a city that had showered him with taunts, rocks and death threats during his 22 seasons with the Detroit Tigers.
SPORTS
May 13, 2011 | by the Daily News
Here are baseball's longest hitting streaks since 1900, topped by Joe DiMaggio's 56-game streak in 1941. The longest hitting streak in the last 5 years belongs to the Phillies' Chase Utley at 35 games. Five players have reached 30 games since and been stopped in their attempt at No. 31. 56: Joe DiMaggio, Yankees, 1941 44: Pete Rose, Cincinnati, 1978 41: George Sisler, St. Louis, 1922 40: Ty Cobb, Detroit, 1911 39: Paul Molitor, Milwaukee, 1987 38: Jimmy Rollins, Phillies, 2005-06 37: Tommy Holmes, Boston, 1945 35: Ty Cobb, Detroit, 1917 George Sisler, St. Louis, 1924-25 Luis Castillo, Florida, 2002 Chase Utley, Phillies, 2006 34: George McQuinn, St. Louis, 1938 Dom DiMaggio, Boston, 1949 Benito Santiago, San Diego, 1987 33: Hal Chase, Yankees, 1907 Rogers Hornsby, St. Louis, 1922 Heinie Manush, Washington, 1933 32: Harry Heilman, Detroit, 1922-23 Hal Morris, Cincinnati, 1996-97 31: Nap Lajoie, Cleveland, 1906 Vada Pinson, Cincinnati, 1965-66 Willie Davis, Los Angeles, 1969 Rico Carty, Atlanta, 1970 Ron LeFlore, Detroit, 1975-76 Ken Landreaux, Minnesota, 1980 Vladimir Guerrero, Montreal, 1999 Tris Speaker, Boston, 1912 30: Charlie Grimm, Cubs, 1922-23 Lance Richbourg, Boston Braves, 1927-28 Sam Rice, Washington, 1929-30 Goose Goslin, Detroit,...
SPORTS
October 5, 2001 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Rickey Henderson became baseball's career runs leader with a home run yesterday, passing Ty Cobb with No. 2,246 and celebrating with a feet-first slide at the plate. His record-setting run came with one out in the third inning of San Diego's 6-3 win over visiting Los Angeles. As promised, Henderson slid across home plate to set the record. After the celebration at home plate, Tony Gwynn, who's retiring after the end of this season, presented a gold-plated replica of home to Henderson.
SPORTS
June 23, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
Dan Snyder has been forced to circle the wagons in his greedy defense of the controversial Washington Redskins trademark. And few outside of Cleveland would be surprised, or dismayed, if the Indians' overtly racist logo - the toothy Chief Wahoo - soon vanished. The supporters of these anachronistic sporting symbols see them as worthy, innocent, and long-standing traditions. But to believe that, you've got to overlook the disturbing history from which they arose. There was a time in American sports, predominantly in early 20th-century baseball, when deformed or degraded mascots were the norm.
NEWS
January 13, 1995 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Though nominally a biography of baseball great Ty Cobb, "Cobb" has as its real subject the tricky relationship between sports fans and sports idols. Most of us admire athletic excellence so much we are willing to ignore the seamy by-products of sports - wife-beating, substance abuse, assault, plus general immorality and loutish behavior. The better the player, the more we fans are willing to look the other way. Cobb is a case in point. He could hit .400, a shield so impenetrable it protected Cobb (the movie argues)
NEWS
August 28, 1987
"Paulie! Paulie!" cheered the appreciative Milwaukee fans who had stoutly digested the fact that Paul Molitor had reached the end of baseball's fifth- longest hitting streak in this century. Mr. Molitor's 39-game streak ended in the oddest of fashions. He was waiting for one last turn at bat Wednesday night, when one of his more mortal teammates singled in the winning run. The fans, who would normally be ecstatic at such a moment, began to boo. Then there was a long silence. Then the cheers for "Paulie!"
SPORTS
August 6, 1993 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Sparky Anderson, who should know, has pronounced the Detroit Tigers all but dead. "Nothing is impossible," the manager said yesterday after the Tigers lost to Cleveland. "It's not impossible. But it's not reasonable. " The Tigers are 8 1/2 games behind Toronto in the American League East. Detroit climbed as many as 18 games above .500 in June and seemed to be positioning itself for a pennant race despite a pitching staff riddled with holes. But the Tigers are 6-15 since the all-star break.
NEWS
April 2, 2002 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Ty Cobb was one of the fiercest, meanest, most aggressive baseball players ever to put on a major-league uniform. If you have any doubt about that, just ask the incarnation of Cobb who is the subject of Cobb at Act II Playhouse. He would tell you that the qualifying one of is unnecessary. Without question, he was the fiercest and meanest man ever to play the game. More than that, he tells us, he was "the greatest ballplayer that ever lived. " The Ty Cobb of Lee Blessing's play is not a modest man, but then he had a lot to be immodest about.
SPORTS
June 11, 2008 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Second-chance stars Give Texas manager Ron "Father Flanagan" Washington credit. Under his watch, players with troubled pasts - most notably, Milton Bradley and Josh Hamilton - have become American League hitting stars. And Vicente Padilla, another guy with a checkered past, has become a quality pitcher. Bradley, who's probably best-known for his run-ins with fans, managers and umpires, leads the AL in hitting. Hamilton, who has recovered from a drug addiction, tops the AL in homers and RBIs and is among the league's hitting leaders.
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January 5, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
Surrounded by Fishtown's redbrick sea, Palmer Cemetery is an eerie urban island. Neighbors of the 250-year-old burial grounds insist spirits of the Revolutionary and Civil War veterans interred there sometimes prowl its weathered headstones and foreboding maples. Meanwhile, just a block away, another more tangible neighborhood ghost is stirring to life. At the cramped corner of Tulip and Palmer Streets, a long-abandoned Industrial Age building that, in terms of its baseball pedigree, may now be the most significant structure in Philadelphia is being converted into 30 apartments.
SPORTS
June 23, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
Dan Snyder has been forced to circle the wagons in his greedy defense of the controversial Washington Redskins trademark. And few outside of Cleveland would be surprised, or dismayed, if the Indians' overtly racist logo - the toothy Chief Wahoo - soon vanished. The supporters of these anachronistic sporting symbols see them as worthy, innocent, and long-standing traditions. But to believe that, you've got to overlook the disturbing history from which they arose. There was a time in American sports, predominantly in early 20th-century baseball, when deformed or degraded mascots were the norm.
NEWS
October 21, 2012
Peter Rozovsky is an Inquirer editor who also writes about international crime fiction at Detectives Beyond Borders, www.detectivesbeyond-borders.blogspot.com As the San Francisco Giants battled the St. Louis Cardinals in the National League Championship Series, it was worth recalling that, one hundred years ago, a great New York Giant took a pioneering look inside the game. Bill James has famously scorned the idea of "inside baseball," insisting that insiders are too close to the action and too self-interested to offer accurate perspectives on the game and how it is played and won. But before Moneyball , Ball Four , and James' new statistical measures called sabermetrics, an insider, though one far more articulate than most, analyzed the game as rigorously from the dugout, the pitcher's mound, and the coach's box as Bill James does from his home in Kansas.
SPORTS
May 13, 2011 | by the Daily News
Here are baseball's longest hitting streaks since 1900, topped by Joe DiMaggio's 56-game streak in 1941. The longest hitting streak in the last 5 years belongs to the Phillies' Chase Utley at 35 games. Five players have reached 30 games since and been stopped in their attempt at No. 31. 56: Joe DiMaggio, Yankees, 1941 44: Pete Rose, Cincinnati, 1978 41: George Sisler, St. Louis, 1922 40: Ty Cobb, Detroit, 1911 39: Paul Molitor, Milwaukee, 1987 38: Jimmy Rollins, Phillies, 2005-06 37: Tommy Holmes, Boston, 1945 35: Ty Cobb, Detroit, 1917 George Sisler, St. Louis, 1924-25 Luis Castillo, Florida, 2002 Chase Utley, Phillies, 2006 34: George McQuinn, St. Louis, 1938 Dom DiMaggio, Boston, 1949 Benito Santiago, San Diego, 1987 33: Hal Chase, Yankees, 1907 Rogers Hornsby, St. Louis, 1922 Heinie Manush, Washington, 1933 32: Harry Heilman, Detroit, 1922-23 Hal Morris, Cincinnati, 1996-97 31: Nap Lajoie, Cleveland, 1906 Vada Pinson, Cincinnati, 1965-66 Willie Davis, Los Angeles, 1969 Rico Carty, Atlanta, 1970 Ron LeFlore, Detroit, 1975-76 Ken Landreaux, Minnesota, 1980 Vladimir Guerrero, Montreal, 1999 Tris Speaker, Boston, 1912 30: Charlie Grimm, Cubs, 1922-23 Lance Richbourg, Boston Braves, 1927-28 Sam Rice, Washington, 1929-30 Goose Goslin, Detroit,...
SPORTS
June 11, 2008 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Second-chance stars Give Texas manager Ron "Father Flanagan" Washington credit. Under his watch, players with troubled pasts - most notably, Milton Bradley and Josh Hamilton - have become American League hitting stars. And Vicente Padilla, another guy with a checkered past, has become a quality pitcher. Bradley, who's probably best-known for his run-ins with fans, managers and umpires, leads the AL in hitting. Hamilton, who has recovered from a drug addiction, tops the AL in homers and RBIs and is among the league's hitting leaders.
SPORTS
July 30, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
Ben Broussard, a former everyday position player now relegated mostly to pinch-hitting situations, was in the training room stretching out for a possible at-bat. Suddenly, he was sprinting up the tunnel and scrambling to find his hat and glove after Richie Sexson's quick ejection yesterday. It might have been the best scenario for the Mariners. Just an inning after Sexson was tossed, Broussard hit a two-out, two-run homer to tie the game in the seventh, and host Seattle scored four more times in the eighth for a wild 14-10 win over Oakland.
NEWS
October 31, 2004 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A picture in the photo collection of the National Baseball Hall of Fame shows a young girl standing on a ball field gazing up at a grinning Babe Ruth. The girl is Jean Farrington, who later donated this image to the Hall of Fame Library. The photo will be part of a new pictorial history, Grand Old Game: 365 Days of Baseball, written by baseball historian Joseph Wallace and scheduled for release in February. "In an age before radio or television when most children never got to see the legendary Ruth play . . . to be able to stand beside him must have been a thrill of a lifetime," Wallace wrote.
SPORTS
May 28, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
Carlos Pena and the hard-hitting Detroit Tigers left their mark on the Kansas City Royals - especially Justin Huisman. Pena's line drive struck the Royals reliever on the forehead, leaving a clear imprint of the baseball. Huisman was OK after Pena's single, one of a team record-tying 27 hits by the visiting Tigers in a 17-7 romp yesterday. Pena went 6-for-6 with two home runs and five RBI, and now shares the club record for hits in a nine-inning game with Ty Cobb and two others.
SPORTS
May 7, 2003 | Daily News Wire Services
On the most phenomenal night of his major league career, Detroit's Dmitri Young did more than just go 5-for-5 with two homers, two triples and five RBI. He also passed up a chance to hit for the cycle, and fell tantalizingly close to matching a record that Ty Cobb has held for 78 years. Led by Young, the Tigers clinched their first series victory since August by defeating Baltimore, 7-6, last night. Young finished with 15 total bases, one short of the team record set by Cobb in 1925.
SPORTS
September 19, 2002 | By TED TAYLOR For the Daily News
Coach's Corner CEO Nick Malack handles some of the rarest sports memorabilia, items that are consigned for his 13 annual sports and celebrity auctions. But there's at least one item on the block for the current auction that really has his pulse racing: a T-206 Ty Cobb red background portrait card consigned by a Connecticut collector. The card is graded PSA 8 NM-MT, and that's very impressive for a card more than 90 years old. Malack says this one is sharp red, not "orange" as some versions of the card have become over the years.
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