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Tylenol

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NEWS
February 16, 1986 | By Ewart Rouse, Inquirer Staff Writer
"We didn't believe it could happen," James E. Burke, board chairman of Johnson & Johnson, told a news conference Friday. "And nobody else did. " But last week, it did happen. A woman in Westchester County, N.Y., died of cyanide poisoning after taking Tylenol capsules - more than three years after the deaths of seven Chicago- area residents who had taken cyanide-laced Tylenol. Now, Johnson & Johnson once again faces an extraordinary business challenge. Can the company find a way to renew the public's trust and avoid the loss of hundreds of millions of dollars in future revenue from what had been one of the nation's most popular over-the-counter drugs?
FOOD
January 20, 1988 | By ROSE DeWOLF, Daily News Staff Writer
Jar Wars! There is a revolution under way in the world of food packaging. You need only walk through the aisles of your local supermarket to see hundreds of examples. Look at that spaghetti sauce jar. The lid says: LOOK - SAFETY BUTTON. REJECT IF BUTTON IS UP. (The center of the lid feels firm until the jar is opened, then becomes noticeably flexible.) Look at that cottage cheese container with a plastic collar locked around the lid. The lid can't be opened until the collar is broken.
NEWS
February 15, 1986 | By Ewart Rouse, Inquirer Staff Writer
"We didn't believe it could happen," James E. Burke, board chairman of Johnson & Johnson, told a news conference Friday. "And nobody else did. " But last week, it did happen. A woman in Westchester County, N.Y., died of cyanide poisoning after taking Tylenol capsules - more than three years after the deaths of seven Chicago- area residents who had taken cyanide-laced Tylenol. Now, Johnson & Johnson once again faces an extraordinary business challenge. Can the company find a way to renew the public's trust and avoid the loss of hundreds of millions of dollars in future revenue from what had been one of the nation's most popular over-the-counter drugs?
NEWS
May 20, 2010 | By Miriam Hill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Robert Lincoln McNeil Jr., the Philadelphia chemist who helped introduce the world to the best-selling painkiller Tylenol and later sold his family business to pharmaceutical giant Johnson & Johnson, died Thursday at the age of 94 of heart failure at his Wyndmoor home. A grandson of Robert McNeil, who founded the company that became McNeil Laboratories in a Kensington drugstore in 1879, McNeil Jr. also was a major patron of many cultural and educational institutions, including the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Philadelphia Zoo, the University of Pennsylvania, the University of the Sciences and Yale University.
BUSINESS
September 18, 1986 | By FREDERICK H. LOWE, Daily News Staff Writer
In 1982, following the deaths of seven Chicago-area residents who had taken cyanide-laced Tylenol capsules, Johnson & Johnson, parent of Tylenol's manufacturer, ordered a nationwide recall that eventually cost the company $100 million. That same year, lawyers for Johnson & Johnson sued nine of its insurance companies to recover $80 million of the recall cost. The insurance companies, including Employees Insurance of Wausau, countered that the coverage pertained only to claims by individuals who sue McNeil Consumer Products, the division that made Tylenol capsules.
NEWS
September 20, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
Consumers need to be warned that they could unwittingly take a fatal overdose of the over-the-counter drug acetaminophen, which is contained in painkillers such as Tylenol and in cold relievers, a government panel was told yesterday. A mother who said her son died from the drug told the panel, "Death is not an acceptable side effect. " Hours later, the panel voted 21-1 to recommend that a stronger warning - yet to be determined - be placed on the labels of more than 200 products that contain the drug.
NEWS
September 29, 2004 | By John Shiffman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A man accused of faking his death to try to collect a $1 million life insurance policy tried to commit suicide on the eve of his trial, the hospital treating him told a federal court. Derek Nicholson, 31, took an overdose of Tylenol on Sunday evening, said Riverview Medical Center in Red Bank, N.J., in a medical report that was read aloud yesterday in federal court in Trenton. Nicholson's condition is critical but stable and his prognosis fair to good, according to the report.
NEWS
February 14, 1986 | By SCOTT FLANDER, Daily News Staff Writer
After a woman died last weekend from taking cyanide-laced Tylenol, many people in Philadelphia assumed it was an isolated incident and continued taking the painkiller. But as word spread last night that two more bottles of Tylenol were found to contain the poison in Westchester County, N.Y., where the woman died, few people seemed willing to take a chance any longer. "I'm off Tylenol now," said Carol Gentis, 34, as she shopped in Aversa Pharmacy in South Philadelphia last night.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
As punishment for bits of metal ending up in Children's Tylenol and other medicines, Johnson & Johnson pleaded guilty Tuesday to one criminal count in federal court in Philadelphia and will pay $25 million for poor manufacturing practices at its Fort Washington plant. The plea relates to metal particles, such as nickel and chromium, that were found in children's liquid medicine made at the McNeil Consumer Healthcare plant in Montgomery County between May 2009 and April 2010. The fine is based on a percentage of the sales of those products during the 11 months included in the plea.
NEWS
February 27, 1986
If there's one lesson to be learned from the Tylenol capsule poisoning incident, it's that corporate openness, accessibility and prompt action in the face of a calamity make sound business sense. The Johnson & Johnson Co. has been forced to demonstrate that twice. Unlike other companies caught up in crisis, Johnson & Johnson has recognized that honesty in the face of adversity reaps its rewards. By way of contrast, compare the manner in which Metropolitan Edison Co. handled its version of the Tylenol disaster - the 1979 accident at Three Mile Island - or how Union Carbide Corp.
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BUSINESS
March 12, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
As punishment for bits of metal ending up in Children's Tylenol and other medicines, Johnson & Johnson pleaded guilty Tuesday to one criminal count in federal court in Philadelphia and will pay $25 million for poor manufacturing practices at its Fort Washington plant. The plea relates to metal particles, such as nickel and chromium, that were found in children's liquid medicine made at the McNeil Consumer Healthcare plant in Montgomery County between May 2009 and April 2010. The fine is based on a percentage of the sales of those products during the 11 months included in the plea.
NEWS
February 17, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
On April 24, 1995, Marcus Trunk, a 23-year-old construction worker from Upper Dublin, died from treating a sprained wrist with Tylenol, a drug he thought was completely safe This April, the first of two dozen pending cases involving plaintiffs who fell seriously ill or died from the same medication will be heard in a New Jersey court. And 120 more cases are headed for federal court in Philadelphia. They claim that McNeil-PPC Inc., the Fort Washington company that makes Tylenol, and others repeatedly concealed the serious health risks of the painkiller, also known as acetaminophen.
NEWS
December 2, 2013 | By Janani Rangaswami, For The Inquirer
I recently cared for a patient with worsening kidney failure. After a full investigation, I could find no cause but a coincidence that he had used "Kangaroo," a sex-enhancing supplement, around the time he got sick. While there is no way to prove or disprove the link between the pill and the ailment, it made me consider how little we know about the toxicity of supplements despite how common they are, and the significant number of deaths and life-threatening events they cause each year.
NEWS
October 22, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
BACK IN 1982, the nation was terrorized by the Tylenol poison scare. Although the fatal poisonings of seven people, including a 12-year-old girl, from taking cyanide-laced Extra-Strength Tylenol capsules were confined to the Chicago area, repercussions were felt everywhere. Johnson & Johnson, parent company of McNeil Consumer Healthcare, the drug's manufacturer, pulled 32 million packages of Tylenol off the shelves of stores throughout the nation, taking a huge nose-dive in profits as a result.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Though its Fort Washington plant is still being repaired, and overall profit fell 10.6 percent to $3.5 billion in the first quarter of 2013, Johnson & Johnson said Tuesday that it has put more Tylenol and Motrin on store shelves in the United States through its McNeil Consumer Healthcare unit. "We are pleased with results in our consumer division, with over-the-counter sales in the U.S. up 14 percent," J&J chief financial officer Dominic Caruso said in a conference call with stock market analysts.
NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Linda A. Johnson, Associated Press
TRENTON - Former Johnson & Johnson CEO James E. Burke, who steered the health-care giant through the Tylenol poisonings in the 1980s that resulted in the first tamper-resistant product packaging, has died. The company said Burke died late Friday at the age of 87, after a long, unspecified illness. Burke, who ran the New Brunswick, N.J., company for 13 of his 37 years there, also had a big impact in his second career, as chairman of the Partnership for a Drug-Free America for 16 years.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2012 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
After Johnson & Johnson reported lower overall sales and profit for the second quarter Tuesday, in part because of continuing problems at its McNeil Consumer Healthcare facility in Fort Washington, new chief executive officer Alex Gorsky was asked why he was not considering selling pieces of the health-care giant. Goldman Sachs pharmaceutical analyst Jami Rubin wrote in May that J&J should follow the example of Pfizer Inc. and Abbott Laboratories Inc. and separate its three divisions — consumer products, pharmaceuticals, and devices — because it couldn't manage them all in a way to get full value.
SPORTS
June 12, 2012 | By Ted Silary and Daily News Staff Writer
AS FAR AS Dom Cuoci is concerned, X-ray is the bad version of a four-letter word.   So, though he took a line drive right off the inner part of his left foot Friday while pitching for La Salle High in a PIAA Class AAAA quarterfinal, he ignored all requests by his parents to let a machine take a look. "I told them I wasn't doing X-rays," Cuoci said, laughing. "I said they're too expensive and that we need to save money. " This is year No. 8 for District 12's involvement in PIAA baseball (fourth for the Catholic League)
BUSINESS
May 19, 2012 | By David Sell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
McNeil Consumer Healthcare, the beleaguered Fort Washington drug maker, recalled more products on Thursday. This time, McNeil recalled one lot of Imodium Multi-Symptom Relief, an over-the-counter medicine for diarrhea, gas, bloating and cramps. A company spokeswoman said the 53,892 packages in that lot are likely still with wholesalers, so the recall is directed mainly toward them. Some of the packages might be torn. She said McNeil has no safety concerns about the products in torn packages, but having been exposed to air, the medicine might not provide the intended benefits.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2012 | By David Sell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Consumers wanting Tylenol and Motrin medicines will have to search farther and wait longer, while investors hoping that Johnson & Johnson will show greater profits from those products will have to wait, too. J&J said Tuesday that first-quarter profit rose 12.5 percent, but that there was a slight decrease in total sales and that the company has had increased costs and delays in fixing the problems at the McNeil Consumer Healthcare facility in...
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