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NEWS
September 7, 1986 | By Ron Wolf, Inquirer Staff Writer
During your next trip to the supermarket, the shelves and aisles may appear the same. But look more carefully. Check the wrappers and caps. Examine the labels, seals and lids. Throughout the store, packages are changing, almost before your eyes. Week by week, manufacturers are quietly revamping their products in response to the wave of tampering incidents and threats that has swept the country this year. Look at Jif peanut butter, the target of several tampering threats. Procter & Gamble Co. now puts under the Jif lid a vacuum "freshness seal" that cannot be removed without detection.
NEWS
January 8, 1997 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Dr. John J. Spikes Sr., 67, of Doylestown Township, a recently retired forensic toxicologist who helped investigate several 1982 deaths from tainted medicine, died Saturday at Abington Memorial Hospital. From 1985 until last month, he worked for National Medical Services Inc. in Willow Grove as a forensic toxicologist and acted as an expert witness in civil and criminal cases. In 1982, Dr. Spikes was Illinois' chief toxicologist and a member of the 105-member task force that investigated the tainting of Tylenol tablets that led to several deaths in the Chicago area.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2012 | By David Sell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
McNeil Consumer Healthcare, the beleaguered Fort Washington drug maker, recalled more products on Thursday. This time, McNeil recalled one lot of Imodium Multi-Symptom Relief, an over-the-counter medicine for diarrhea, gas, bloating and cramps. A company spokeswoman said the 53,892 packages in that lot are likely still with wholesalers, so the recall is directed mainly toward them. Some of the packages might be torn. She said McNeil has no safety concerns about the products in torn packages, but having been exposed to air, the medicine might not provide the intended benefits.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2012 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Johnson & Johnson said Tuesday that two high-level managers in the troubled consumer-products division would retire, marking more changes for the world's second-largest health-care company. McNeil Consumer Healthcare, part of the division, was responsible for producing much of the over-the-counter medicine - including Tylenol and Motrin products - that J&J sells in the United States. But McNeil's Fort Washington plant halted production in April 2010 because of manufacturing problems that led to dozens of recalls.
NEWS
March 15, 1987 | By Andy Rooney
American businessmen spend half their time extolling the virtues of competition and the other half trying to eliminate it. Actually making something is just a sideline for many big American corporations these days. They're letting the Japanese actually make things while they spend all their effort looking for ways to take each other over. The Japanese are making the products. All American companies are making is money. The stock market is at an all-time high, partly because so much Japanese money is being put into it. Japan is busy buying America while American companies buy each other.
NEWS
May 11, 1987 | By Joanna Falcone, Inquirer Washington Bureau
More than $1 billion worth of goods - including Girl Scout cookies and baby food - had to be destroyed last year because of actual or claimed tampering with retail products, prompting the federal government to take steps against what one official calls "a form of terrorism. " "If product tampering were a stock, it would have led the Dow Jones average for all of 1986," said Frank Young, commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration. "Product tampering was the most significant emergency problem we faced at FDA in 1986, and we know that the epidemic can break out at any time again.
NEWS
March 14, 1986 | BY NICHOLAS VON HOFFMAN
Word reaching here has it that Los Angeles radio station KRLA recently fired its on-air personality, Bob Hudson, for wisecracking that the rocketship Challenger blew up because the crew was free-basing Tang. In the national capital, no one, perhaps because they understand the penalty for political blasphemy, is telling Challenger jokes on the air, but they're telling them at bars, restaurants, cocktail parties, wherever friends meet. Whenever a new Challenger joke is told, the listener first replies that he never heard anything so tasteless in his life, then bursts out laughing.
NEWS
January 14, 1997
AN ANNUAL TOURNEY AT THE PALESTRA WOULD BE A NET GAIN FOR ALL The athletic directors of the Big Five schools would do well to begin an annual tournament at the Palestra so some of the fervor can be put back into this tradition. It also could provide an economic boon to the city. As a Temple and La Salle graduate who recently moved out of Philadelphia, it would be exciting to visit the city for a basketball tournament. It could be a good way to start each college basketball season in Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 31, 1992 | By Laura Spinale, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Seven-year-old Jennifer McCafferty doesn't remember much about March 23 - much about the daytime hours, anyway. She doesn't remember what she learned in school, what she did when she got home, or whom she played with. As a matter of routine, Jennifer knows that she and her mother, Linda, started the day at Croydon's St. Thomas Aquinas School, where Jennifer is a first grader and Linda teaches gym. Not so routine was Linda McCafferty's headache, which she described on Wednesday as "a real pounder.
BUSINESS
October 17, 1996 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the television ad, singer-actress Julie Andrews told of a "new" line of products to ease arthritis pain. But the attorneys general of Pennsylvania and 18 other states saw nothing new about them. The medicines, they said, were repackaged versions of well-known ingredients - aspirin, acetaminophen and ibuprofen - labeled with the name of a prominent patient-advocacy group. Yesterday, the states announced a settlement of nearly $2 million in a deceptive-marketing case brought against McNeil Consumer Products Co., of Fort Washington, and the Arthritis Foundation, an Atlanta nonprofit organization, for marketing the painkillers.
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