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Tyler Arboretum

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NEWS
December 2, 1993 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As part of its celebration of the "magic of evergreens," Tyler Arboretum will offer holiday wreath and centerpiece workshops, a Christmas greens sale and outdoor rambles. At 9:30 a.m. Tuesday, participants can create an unusual three-foot tabletop topiary using freshly cut evergreen boughs, holly sprigs and other plant material from the arboretum's collection. At 12:30 p.m. and again at 7 p.m. Tuesday, a wreath and centerpiece workshop will be conducted by Tyler staff members.
NEWS
July 16, 1987 | By Marilou Regan, Special to The Inquirer
"By all botanical rights, this tree shouldn't be growing here," Carl Suk said. Suk, director of the Tyler Arboretum in Middletown Township, was pointing to a giant sequoia, 80 feet high with a trunk that's 11 feet around, that stands majestically along Painter Road. Sequoias "are usually grown in a moist, humid atmosphere in the Pacific Northwest, and this one's growing on a dry hilltop," he said. The tree was planted in the late 1850s and is thought to be the oldest sequoia on the East Coast, Suk said.
NEWS
December 3, 1997 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Tyler Arboretum is offering some respite from the hectic mall scene this holiday season with a variety of craft workshops and outdoor activities for children and adults. Holiday Nature Crafts, a program for children ages 4 to 6, will be offered from 1 to 2:30 p.m. tomorrow. The children will use natural materials to make crafts for holiday gifts and decorations. Preregistration is required. The fee is $8 for nonmembers and $5 for members. Local artist Bonnie Lynn Watton will help participants design their own holiday greeting cards from pressed flowers and plants from 1 to 3 p.m. Sunday.
NEWS
July 18, 1991 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer
Ten-year-old David Laudenslager scooped up a fuzzy caterpillar, examined it carefully and then gently returned it to some leaves in the butterfly garden at Tyler Arboretum. On the trail, his little brother, Mike, spotted minnows in the creek as he climbed along the rocks bordering the water. Mary Kay Hamm was busy jotting down the names of tree species to help in the selection of trees for her property in a historic district in South Wayne. Over by the pond, Virginia Davis, 63, of Rose Valley, decided to rest on a shaded bench as her husband embarked on a long walk.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2001 | By Stephen B. Goldstein FOR THE INQUIRER
Maybe I could have understood Little Miss Muffett a little better if sculptor David Rogers had created the spider that sat down beside her. Rogers makes bugs. Huge bugs. Enormous bugs. Those 1950-sci-fi-movie-radioactive-gigantic-bugs. And starting this weekend at Tyler Arboretum in Media, you can get up close and personal with these giant bugs in the "Big Bugs" exhibit. Sculpted entirely from found natural materials such as red cedar, willow, and black walnut, Rogers' creations are part of a walking tour through the arboretum that allows visitors to see the insects in their "natural habitat.
NEWS
September 11, 1998 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Butterflies will find it hard to resist the colorful river of flowers that flows into the newly created meadow maze at Tyler Arboretum. And visitors to Tyler's newest offering will find it difficult to complete the tour without gleaning some insight into native plants and wildlife. The Stopford Family Meadow Maze, which opens tomorrow, features a four-ring labyrinth, the butterfly river, and a series of discovery stations along the maze's perimeter that are designed to educate and entertain visitors.
NEWS
September 28, 2003 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Tyler Arboretum in Delaware County, one of the oldest and largest arboretums in the northeastern United States, has played a significant role in both the human and natural history of our area for more than 300 years. During the 18th and 19th centuries, it evolved from a colonial land grant to a working farm to finally a Quaker country estate. In the 20th century, it became an arboretum. And this year, Tyler Arboretum was added to the National Register of Historic Places. The history of this land is intertwined with the story of eight generations of the Minshall/Painter/Tyler family.
NEWS
July 5, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joan Strachota, 71, formerly of Wallingford, who taught hearing-impaired children in Delaware County for 36 years, died of kidney cancer Wednesday, June 15, at White Horse Village in Newtown Square. Ms. Strachota spent her professional career working with hard-of-hearing children at Delaware County Intermediate Unit in Morton. She believed most children born with a hearing loss could learn to speak and to "listen" by reading lips and using hearing aids, said Marcia Finisdore, whose three children inherited hearing loss from her and were taught by Ms. Strachota.
NEWS
February 22, 1990 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer
The sky was heavy with the threat of rain, but that didn't deter a group of young adventurers from heading out to Tyler Arboretum in Middletown. The youngsters, ages 6 and older, were eager to discover the secret of making maple syrup. Volunteers at the arboretum rounded up the troops and together they set out on their first task - finding a maple tree in the grounds outside the education center at Tyler Arboretum. Volunteer Anita Pew gave some helpful hints. "When the day comes and we're in Vermont, this is what we do," said Pew as she demonstrated how to measure the tree to determine how many taps it could take.
NEWS
June 3, 1990 | By Lyn A.E. McCafferty, Special to The Inquirer
To some people, dandelions, buttercups and chickweed are nothing more than weeds that annoy those trying to achieve the perfect green lawn. But to John Ballas and others at Tyler Arboretum, those plants are beautiful. "Most people just need somebody to show them all the beautiful plants we have out here," said Ballas, 74. "The land at Tyler is so rich in vegetation - this is wildflower heaven. " Every Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Ballas leads groups of adults through Tyler Arboretum in Middletown Township to see what each new week has to offer in the way of newly blooming wildflowers.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 7, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard Allen Colbert, 58, of Newark, Del., executive director of Tyler Arboretum in Media for 23 years, died Saturday, Nov. 29, of pancreatic cancer at his home. He had been diagnosed in 2012. A native of Delaware who specialized in horticulture and business, Mr. Colbert became the first horticulturist for Newark in 1978, and developed a program to beautify the city's traffic islands using low-maintenance plants. In 1991, he became the head of Tyler Arboretum. He helped make the arboretum a regional, family-oriented destination by expanding the educational outreach, increasing community programs, and upgrading the plant collections.
NEWS
August 26, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The monarch butterflies at the Tyler Arboretum were about a week old, so it was time for them to move on. About 60 orange-and-black monarchs, freshly emerged from their chrysalises, were tagged and released into the wild at the arboretum's Butterfly Festival on Saturday. Over the next several weeks, the delicate insects will flutter about 2,500 miles south and then west before settling in a central Mexican mountain range with millions of others, the longest migratory journey of any North American butterfly.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2012
No need to be shut in during the winter when there are so many gardens and nature centers where your family can enjoy the outdoors while keeping fit and active. Get out and explore! 1 BARTRAM'S GARDEN One of the nation's oldest botanical gardens has 45 acres filled with recreational activities. Admission for some exhibits. 54th Street and Lindbergh Boulevard, 215-729-5281, bartramsgarden.org. 2 SCHUYLKILL ENVIRONMENTAL CENTER Learn about and experience nature at this preserve on the banks of the Schuylkill River.
NEWS
July 15, 2012 | By Beth Kephart
One hundred million years ago, according to Loren Eiseley, the great anthropologist and Penn professor, the world was monochrome green. No dahlia, no foxglove, no halo-headed hydrangea, no speckled lily. Continent by continent, flowerless-ness reigned. Dinosaurs dreamed in forest hues. And then, Eiseley writes in How Flowers Changed the World, "just a short time before the close of the Age of Reptiles, there occurred a soundless, violent explosion. " The explosion was of color and fruit, pistils and stamen.
NEWS
September 5, 2011 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Flight PJG-712 to Mexico departed Sunday at 11:25 a.m. Not from the airport, but from just outside a screened enclosure at Tyler Arboretum in Media. The flight was that of a monarch butterfly, and its "flight number" was printed on a small sticker attached to one wing. Every year, thousands of the orange-and-black winged insects are tagged and released by citizen scientists from nature centers, schools, and other groups across the United States. Every year, hundreds are recovered in central Mexico, the destination point of the fall migration for most of the butterflies.
NEWS
July 5, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joan Strachota, 71, formerly of Wallingford, who taught hearing-impaired children in Delaware County for 36 years, died of kidney cancer Wednesday, June 15, at White Horse Village in Newtown Square. Ms. Strachota spent her professional career working with hard-of-hearing children at Delaware County Intermediate Unit in Morton. She believed most children born with a hearing loss could learn to speak and to "listen" by reading lips and using hearing aids, said Marcia Finisdore, whose three children inherited hearing loss from her and were taught by Ms. Strachota.
NEWS
May 22, 2005 | By Mary Anne Janco INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For Althea Whyte, a bluebird monitor at Tyler Arboretum, the most thrilling part of the job is watching the baby bluebirds leave the nest. "I've seen them in the process of fledging," Whyte said. "You see them with their heads" in the hole of the bluebird box "trying to decide whether they can do it or not," she said. "Last year, we fledged 83 bluebirds," said Suzanne Clauser, coordinator of the arboretum's bluebird program. Earlier this month, she reported that the arboretum had 10 active nests.
NEWS
September 5, 2004 | By Gloria A. Hoffner INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Connecting circles of tall grasses, seasonal wildflowers, and butterfly-attracting plants await visitors to next Sunday's Meadow Maze Madness event at Tyler Arboretum. The maze, which contains no dead ends, provides a fun way to exercise and is a learning tool for discovering the ecology of the meadow from tiny critters to 6-foot-tall grasses. It is a mostly flat, wide, mowed grass path designed for comfortable walking with shade areas, benches and information centers throughout, arboretum spokeswoman Kirsten Werner said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2004 | By Gene D'Alessandro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's amazing how many butterflies and caterpillars have taken up residence at lush Tyler Arboretum. The place is literally crawling with them. Hundreds of the colorful creatures - in every stage of their metamorphosis - will be on display for "Amazing Butterflies," a new exhibition opening Saturday in Media. Swarms of giant monarch replicas greet patrons as they enter the exhibition. The 4-foot-tall models - mounted on hemlock trees over the entrance - sway when the wind blows.
NEWS
May 19, 2004 | By Dick Cooper INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Densely wooded hills are sliced deep by fast-running trout streams. Hiking trails climb up steep slopes and down into dark green valleys. Yoga classes are held in a clearing framed by magnolias and lilacs. All can be found minutes up the road from the blacktop, traffic, and bright lights of the Granite Run Mall. The Media area has one of the largest woodland tracts and best hiking and biking trails in Delaware County. The 2,600 acres of Ridley Creek State Park and the adjoining 650 acres of the Tyler Arboretum combine to cover an area the size of Center City Philadelphia.
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