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NEWS
October 20, 2005
On Saturday evening, Philadelphia will be among 44 cities around the world taking part in International GuluWalk Day. Participants will simulate a "night commute. " They will walk and stay overnight at a local church to raise awareness of children caught in war in northern Uganda. Gulu is a town in northern Uganda. In the last 19 years, 30,000 children have been kidnapped and forced to become soldiers and sex slaves. Thousands more, called "night commuters," make a nightly trek from their rural homes to sleep in the relative safety of cities.
NEWS
July 14, 2010 | By Bonnie L. Cook, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The leader of a team of Pennsylvania missionaries who were injured in Sunday's terror bombings in Uganda has written a firsthand account of the episode. "I remember a bright flash and everything went grey and it felt like rain," Lori Ssebulime, of Selinsgrove, Pa., wrote from Kampala, replying on her blog to questions from The Inquirer. "...I heard screaming from every direction. " Ssebulime is still in Africa, monitoring the medical care of five team members who were wounded by one of two blasts that shook Kampala on Sunday, killing 74 people.
NEWS
March 25, 1998 | By Jodi Enda, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
At 14, Jacob Sekiziyivu is in his fourth year of school. He has learned to read and speak English in a classroom with no electricity and no desks, where one teacher instructs 79 students squeezed tightly on wooden benches. The youth considers himself very lucky indeed. In a country where 89 percent of the adults cannot read, on a continent where only half the children go to school, even the most spartan of educations can be considered a luxury. It's one Uganda's president, Yoweri Museveni, is striving to make commonplace.
NEWS
July 13, 2010 | By Angela Couloumbis and Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writers
SELINSGROVE, Pa. - When nine of their colleagues flew home last week, five missionaries from this north-central Pennsylvania community stayed in Uganda to work at an urgent task. They hoped to finish a wall protecting their sister congregation's church and school in Kampala - in particular, one missionary said, to shield children from a scourge that haunts Uganda: ritual child sacrifice. "We've got time. We'll just stay. " That was how Gerald Wolgemuth, director of communications for the Susquehanna Conference of the United Methodist Church, described the volunteers' reasoning.
NEWS
December 6, 2012 | By Jerome Delay and Melanie Gouby, Associated Press
BUNAGANA, Congo - Congo's M23 rebels are sending a delegation to Kampala, Uganda, to negotiate with the Congolese government Thursday, the rebels' president said. "Our delegation will drive to Kampala for talks," M23 president Jean-Marie Runiga told the Associated Press. Runiga said talks with representatives of President Joseph Kabila's Kinshasa government must be wide-ranging negotiations to cover constitutional and governance issues and should include the Congolese opposition and civic organizations.
SPORTS
August 19, 2012 | Associated Press
SOUTH WILLIAMSPORT, Pa. - Win or lose, the Little League World Series team from Uganda has become a hometown favorite. The first team from Africa to advance to South Williamsport in the 66-year history of the tourney did fall in its debut Friday. Panama defeated the boys from Lugazi, 9-3. Uganda's coaches said they didn't expect any parents of the players to make the expensive transatlantic trip to Pennsylvania. But Uganda has still drawn vocal fans who cheered wildly, especially after Daniel Alio's towering home run to center in the sixth.
NEWS
October 10, 1987 | By David Zucchino, Inquirer Staff Writer
The signpost for Busiro is a neat stack of bleached human skulls and skeletons. This is all that remains of peasants who failed to flee Busiro when the soldiers of Milton Obote came to pillage and murder. Those who did manage to escape have returned now to find their neighbors' bones and not much else. In Busiro, and all across the fertile farmland known as the Luwero Triangle, survivors have returned to confront the realities of Uganda's long descent into savagery. Former President Obote and his soldiers ravaged the area from 1980 through 1985.
NEWS
July 12, 2010 | By Bonnie L. Cook, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Six of 15 missionaries from Selinsgrove who went to Uganda June 16 to help build a wall around a church and school were due to return home July 7 but stayed to complete the work, a church spokesman said today. The six had reasoned that "we've got time. We'll just stay," according to Gerald Wolgemuth, director of communications for the Susquehanna Conference of the United Methodist Church. While nine members of the team arrived home July 7 in Pennsylvania, the others' decision proved fateful: They were at a garden restaurant Sunday in Kampala watching the final match of the World Cup when terrorists set off a bomb beneath a table.
NEWS
July 15, 2010 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
The leader of a team of Pennsylvania missionaries who were injured in Sunday's terror bombings in Uganda has written a firsthand account of the episode. "I remember a bright flash, and everything went gray and it felt like rain," Lori Ssebulime of Selinsgrove wrote from Kampala, replying on her blog to questions from The Inquirer. "I heard screaming from every direction. " Ssebulime was still in Africa on Wednesday, monitoring the medical care of the five team members wounded by one of two blasts that killed 76 people.
NEWS
June 16, 2014 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
Jodi Sabra began her career as an actress. The training has served her well as a sixth-grade social studies and language-arts teacher at Radnor Middle School in Wayne. She views teaching as a performance art, and her style of teaching is infused with her congenital optimism. In 2009, a college friend who runs a service travel program asked Sabra whether she'd like to involve her students in a pen-pal program with students at a school in Uganda. "I say yes to everything," Sabra says, and soon her students were writing letters to the Bupala Primary School in the remote Iganga district of Uganda.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 30, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Andrew Wegoye, an emergency-room nurse at Inspira Medical Center Woodbury, will leave Thursday for at least four months in Liberia helping fight the Ebola epidemic. Wegoye, 33, who lives in Haddon Township, said he had been following the crisis, and when the World Health Organization declared it a disaster, he felt he had to step forward. "When I noticed it was not being contained, but just kept spiraling, I started searching for ways to actually help. " "The risks I totally understand," Wegoye added.
NEWS
June 16, 2014 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
Jodi Sabra began her career as an actress. The training has served her well as a sixth-grade social studies and language-arts teacher at Radnor Middle School in Wayne. She views teaching as a performance art, and her style of teaching is infused with her congenital optimism. In 2009, a college friend who runs a service travel program asked Sabra whether she'd like to involve her students in a pen-pal program with students at a school in Uganda. "I say yes to everything," Sabra says, and soon her students were writing letters to the Bupala Primary School in the remote Iganga district of Uganda.
NEWS
March 18, 2014 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seven years after she left Philadelphia, Jennifer Anyayo is preparing for the exam she must pass to keep moving toward college in her homeland of Uganda. She's being tested in another momentous way. She's a new mother - and loves it. "Sometimes when I'm carrying her," Anyayo said in a telephone interview, "I will be very serious and she will look at me, and she will smile and I smile back. " Anyayo's guiding light remains Abitimo Odongkara, the educator who spent decades shuttling between Philadelphia and the town of Gulu in their their northern Ugandan homeland.
NEWS
October 10, 2013 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Clarke Horowitz needed a bar mitzvah community service project, selling beads to help children in Africa seemed like a perfect way to give back. So far, Horowitz, 13, of Voorhees, has raised $1,200 to support children in Uganda. Although his bar mitzvah was a few weeks ago, he plans to keep selling the beads. "I enjoy it, so I would like to help," Horowitz said. "I know there's probably a kid just like me in Africa. " Horowitz and two other students who organized projects in South Jersey to help children in Uganda whose families have been ravaged by HIV/AIDS had a chance Tuesday to hear firsthand how their work has made a difference.
NEWS
December 6, 2012 | By Jerome Delay and Melanie Gouby, Associated Press
BUNAGANA, Congo - Congo's M23 rebels are sending a delegation to Kampala, Uganda, to negotiate with the Congolese government Thursday, the rebels' president said. "Our delegation will drive to Kampala for talks," M23 president Jean-Marie Runiga told the Associated Press. Runiga said talks with representatives of President Joseph Kabila's Kinshasa government must be wide-ranging negotiations to cover constitutional and governance issues and should include the Congolese opposition and civic organizations.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2012 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
The Watoto Children's Choir from Uganda brings the "Beautiful Africa: A New Generation" tour through Philadelphia, performing at three venues to raise awareness of the plight of children left orphaned by HIV/AIDS, war, illness, and poverty. The first of the free concert series begins at 7 p.m. Saturday in West Philadelphia at the African Cultural Alliance of North America Community Center at 5530 Chester Ave. Sunday performances will be at 7:45 and 10:45 a.m. at Mount Airy Church of God in Christ, 6401 Ogontz Ave., and 6:30 p.m. at the New Life Glenside Church at 467 N. Easton Rd. The sound of the Watoto Children's Choir, composed of children who have lost one or both parents, is described as a blend of contemporary gospel and traditional African rhythm.
SPORTS
September 3, 2012 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
Jimmy Rollins may be the most fascinating athlete in Philadelphia history. Consider Wilt Chamberlain's biographical claims and the long list of other superstars and characters to come through this town, and that really is saying something. Just think about the week that passed. Rollins was first in the news for welcoming a group of youngsters from Uganda to Citizens Bank Park after they had become the first team from Africa to win a game at the Little League World Series in Williamsport.
SPORTS
August 30, 2012 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Henry Odong searched through his wallet in hopes of retrieving his Jimmy Rollins baseball card. Odong said he has held onto the card for nearly a decade after he received it from an American baseball coach traveling in Nigeria. As Odong's fingers passed through the array of business cards, receipts, and photo IDs, the Phillies shortstop himself moved closer. Odong, the 34-year-old head coach of the Uganda Little League team, was in Plymouth Meeting on Tuesday afternoon as his group of 11- and 12-year-olds played an exhibition against the Plymouth Little League at East Plymouth Valley Park.
NEWS
August 28, 2012
12 Mexico police held in shootings MEXICO CITY - A judge has ordered a 40-day detention for 12 federal police officers who fired on a U.S. Embassy vehicle and wounded two U.S. government workers. An official with the federal Attorney General's Office said the officers would be held under a form of house arrest pending an investigation. The official said Monday that the officers would be brought to a detention center in Mexico City from Morelos state, where they were being held on suspicion of abusing their authority.
SPORTS
August 24, 2012 | BY MARK PERNER, Daily News Staff Writer
WHEN THE Ugandan Little League baseball team became the first squad from an African nation to win a game at the Little League World Series, the Phillies' Jimmy Rollins tweeted: "Congratulations to Uganda for their first ever LLWS victory! Their story is just beginning. " Rollins played a huge role in making the win possible. Flash back to the summer of 2011. The Ugandan team qualified for the Series and was supposed to play the Canadian team from Langley, British Columbia. But the Ugandans were denied entrance into the United States because of a lack of documentation.
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