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Ugly Duckling

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NEWS
August 22, 1991 | by Evan Levine,, Special to the Daily News
THE UGLY DUCKLING Random House Home Video, $14.95 Everyone gets a little teary over the fairy tale of the duckling who is tormented and teased before he grows up and discovers he's actually a swan. This version, nicely narrated by Cher, sticks faithfully to the tale. It takes viewers from the duckling's hatching among the nasty barnyard animals through his trials among cruel humans, malicious fellow animals and cold winters - until he emerges a snowy white swan. The illustrations have the feel of Japanese watercolors; they are done mostly in browns and grays, which makes the story feel somewhat grim.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1986 | By Diana Henriques, Inquirer Staff Writer
John W. Davidson's mother has always loved him, of course. And she was quite proud of Davidson, the fixed-income guru of One Federal Asset Management in Boston, even before he suggested late last year that she buy a Treasury bond maturing in 15 years or so. Such bonds are the ugly ducklings of the government securities markets, Davidson said. For a variety of tax and liquidity reasons - factors that are very important to traders and their institutional clients - the Treasury bonds maturing early in the next century are "just not an actively traded part of the market," he said.
REAL_ESTATE
August 11, 2013 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
Picture a dreary-looking house sitting on a nice-size lot in Longport, N.J. It has dark-texture board outside and numerous small rooms inside, the kind of house a buyer with no remodeling plan would bypass in a second. Or maybe not. "We took a sledgehammer to it," says homeowner Sue Lutz, 59, referring to the one load-bearing wall that had stood near the main door. "We [also] took the ceiling down," says her husband, Fred, 61. "We needed to see what we could do. " Columns replaced that bearing wall, which wasn't the only one that went down on a whim.
NEWS
February 22, 1988 | By ROSE DeWOLF, Daily News Staff Writer
Ugly guys may not be America's newest sex symbols, but you have to admit they have been getting a lot of good publicity lately. Ugly women haven't done as well . . . as usual. The newest hit on Broadway is "The Phantom of the Opera" - the story of a terribly disfigured man who hides in the shadows of a theater, yearning for the love of a beautiful young singer. In this musical version of the oft-told tale, audiences root for the Phantom. They - like the show's heroine - realize that beneath the mask he wears to hide his deformity is one great guy. And then there is Vincent, the hero of TV's popular "Beauty and the Beast.
NEWS
June 15, 2009 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
It's a big week for Hans Christian Andersen in the Philadelphia area. Theatre Horizon's Honk!, a musical take on Andersen's 1843 children's story The Ugly Duckling, dovetails with Robert LePage's The Andersen Project, a very loose take on Andersen's lesser-known children's story The Dryad. Where LePage embraced the adult underpinnings of Andersen's themes, Honk!, written by Anthony Drew with music by George Styles, is family-friendly, though director Matthew Decker embraces the complexities of this barnyard's singing residents.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1989 | By Carol Horner, Inquirer Staff Writer
How's this? Envision Meryl Streep ugly and unpopular. Impossible, you say? But she says it was true in her childhood, in the '50s in the suburbs of northern New Jersey. "I thought no one liked me," she told a Time magazine reporter a decade ago. She described running from an irate crowd of youngsters and climbing a tree to escape them. "Besides that," Current Biography 1980 reports her as saying, "I was ugly. With my glasses and permanented hair, I looked like a mini-adult.
NEWS
June 13, 2009 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Once upon a time there was a boy, a very odd boy, an ugly duckling of a boy. This boy, Robert Lepage, would grow up to be the swan of the international avant-garde - directing Wagner as well as Cirque du Soleil, combining technology with architecture and puppets, each show stranger and more outrageous and more admired than the last. But the swan, though famous, was still looking for a creature like himself, just as he had when he was an ugly duckling. And finally he found another very odd boy, another ugly duckling who also grew into an international swan: Hans Christian Andersen.
NEWS
November 30, 1987 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, Special to The Inquirer
What better way to tell fairy tales than to have children as the storytellers? That's exactly what the West Chester Barley Sheaf Players are doing this holiday season for their 14th Annual Christmas Show. The fairy tales of Hans Christian Andersen, the Danish storyteller and poet, will come to life in ballet and music by students from area schools, with a little help from adults. His classics "The Ballet of the Red Shoes," "The Ugly Duckling" and "The Little Mermaid" will be presented at the players' theater, 29 Whitford Rd., Lionville.
NEWS
September 24, 1987 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
In his narration of Rudyard Kipling's story "The Elephant's Child," actor Jack Nicholson revels in delivering the author's repetitive and alliterative description of "the great gray-green greasy Limpopo River. " Nicholson's performance points up the strength of Rabbit Ears Productions' videos of children's stories: These are videos in which the spoken word and the music are emphasized as much, or more, than the pictures. Indeed, each story is also a recording, and with not one word of the narration altered, almost all the tales are just as vivid without visual accompaniment.
NEWS
August 25, 1993 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Helene diSciullo, alas, can never find time to work in her garden because she's always working in someone else's. It's an occupational hazard for the soft-spoken landscape designer, especially at this time of year. But there's one garden she gladly dallies in, a lush, colorful little plot on the corner of the borough's busiest intersection. It is the borough green. DiSciullo designed it, did much of the planting, and now tends it like a newborn. "It was my most challenging job," she said Monday, strolling along one of the walkways in the green.
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REAL_ESTATE
August 11, 2013 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
Picture a dreary-looking house sitting on a nice-size lot in Longport, N.J. It has dark-texture board outside and numerous small rooms inside, the kind of house a buyer with no remodeling plan would bypass in a second. Or maybe not. "We took a sledgehammer to it," says homeowner Sue Lutz, 59, referring to the one load-bearing wall that had stood near the main door. "We [also] took the ceiling down," says her husband, Fred, 61. "We needed to see what we could do. " Columns replaced that bearing wall, which wasn't the only one that went down on a whim.
NEWS
June 15, 2009 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
It's a big week for Hans Christian Andersen in the Philadelphia area. Theatre Horizon's Honk!, a musical take on Andersen's 1843 children's story The Ugly Duckling, dovetails with Robert LePage's The Andersen Project, a very loose take on Andersen's lesser-known children's story The Dryad. Where LePage embraced the adult underpinnings of Andersen's themes, Honk!, written by Anthony Drew with music by George Styles, is family-friendly, though director Matthew Decker embraces the complexities of this barnyard's singing residents.
NEWS
June 13, 2009 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Once upon a time there was a boy, a very odd boy, an ugly duckling of a boy. This boy, Robert Lepage, would grow up to be the swan of the international avant-garde - directing Wagner as well as Cirque du Soleil, combining technology with architecture and puppets, each show stranger and more outrageous and more admired than the last. But the swan, though famous, was still looking for a creature like himself, just as he had when he was an ugly duckling. And finally he found another very odd boy, another ugly duckling who also grew into an international swan: Hans Christian Andersen.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1999 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The ripeness of Freddie Prinze Jr. and Rachael Leigh Cook goes a long way toward fooling the audience into believing She's All That is something more than rotten leftovers from the Pretty in Pink buffet. When Zack (Prinze), king of his Southern California high school, is jilted by his girl just weeks before the big dance, he bets his pals that he can transform the school's ugliest duckling into a prom swan. But can the right clothes, haircut and makeup turn the bespectacled bohemian Laney (Cook)
NEWS
December 6, 1998 | By Sonia Krishnan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The whoosh of 7,635 gallons of water jetting through the Strawbridge Fountain is almost deafening, but the sound is a welcome one. After all, not too long ago the inside of Plymouth Meeting Mall echoed with the cacophony of drill guns, saws and jackhammers, and denim-clad construction workers seemed to far outstrip the number of shoppers on any given day. Five years and $50 million after planning began, the mall will host a grand reopening at...
NEWS
November 15, 1996 | by Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer
Early in "The Mirror Has Two Faces," Barbra Streisand's heroine, Rose, resists some well-intentioned makeover advice from a friend, who's suggesting: "How about a perm?" "I tried that once," Rose sighs. "I looked like Shirley Temple on crack. " Aha! We haven't forgotten Streisand's infamous '70s poodle perm - and neither, apparently, has the star, though she's now one of the '90s' biggest glamourpusses. That winking self-effacement doesn't mean "The Mirror Has Two Faces" - "a film by Barbra Streisand . . . directed by Barbra Streisand . . . starring Barbra Streisand . . . with 'Love Theme' composed by Barbra Streisand" - isn't as self-conscious and Streisand-obsessed as "Prince of Tides" or her other vanity productions.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1996 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Rose Morgan (Barbra Streisand) teaches literature at Columbia University. Presiding over a lecture hall overflowing with students - each of whom she seems to know by name - the English department Ph.D. discusses Lancelot and Guinevere and the notion of ideal love, a "union of the souls. " At the end of her talk, which is loose and jokey and just the sort of thing to appeal to those brainy college kids, the classroom erupts in applause. Clearly, Professor Morgan is loved. Would that the same could be said for her personal life.
NEWS
June 23, 1996 | By Tara Dooley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Public opinion has not always crowned the Woodbury train station the jewel of the city. When the station was built in 1883 by the West Jersey Railroad, residents felt duped, said Paul W. Schopp, a historical consultant who specializes in transportation. "When it was built, the people of Woodbury were led to believe they were going to get a handsome brick station," he said. " . . . They believed they had deserved better than what they received. " Schopp said the brown-and-beige station built of wood was not majestic enough to represent the county seat and an emerging industrial center in South Jersey.
SPORTS
March 26, 1996 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
In 1956, Jack Ramsay took his first St. Joseph's team to the National Invitation Tournament Final Four at the old Madison Square Garden. Forty years later, Phil Martelli will be taking his first Hawks team to the NIT Final Four at the new Madison Square Garden. Ramsay eventually was enshrined in the Basketball Hall of Fame. Martelli might not get to Springfield, Mass., but he will, at the very least, enjoy himself on the way to wherever it is he is going. Tonight, Martelli and his team will play Alabama (19-11)
BUSINESS
May 3, 1995 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Suburban Station's maze of dingy, confusing corridors soon could be changed into an underground mall, lit through atriums and containing coffee bars, a food court, and a variety of shops in a coordinated design. The plan would at least triple the rail terminal's retail space - to as much as 200,000 square feet, about half the size of the Gallery (not including the Gallery's anchor department stores). The Suburban Station of the future also would be rider-friendly, with sweeping views to train platforms below, new signs, and an attractive and easy-to-use ticket counter.
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