CollectionsUkraine
IN THE NEWS

Ukraine

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 4, 1986
Once again, the country of Ukraine has been desecrated, not only by the Moscow government through its ignorant and reckless use of nuclear power but also by the ignorance of the news media. Some in the media have continued to portray Ukraine and its cities as part of Russia, when this clearly is not the case. Ukraine is the second largest country in Europe, only the country of Russia being greater in size. It is not the Ukraine, a region of the Soviet Union. It is Ukraine, a once-independent country, now held captive by the Moscow government, just as the 14 other so-called "republics" are. In actuality, there is no union, there are no republics.
NEWS
April 13, 1992 | BY VOLODYMYR LANOVOY, From the New York Times
Since the collapse of the Soviet Union, Ukraine has been determined to become a full member of the world community. But in the West, Ukraine is seen as unpredictable and unreasonable, particularly in its dealings with Russia. We are often charged with reckless nationalism, but the claim is seldom examined. Ukraine has been losing the propaganda war, creating unwanted and unnecessary dangers for everyone. A principal explanation for the misperception is that news accounts and expert opinion in the West have a pro-Russian bias.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2014 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
Yards of yarn, goose feathers by the fistful, even a few cowrie shells - with these and more, Vera Nakonechny painstakingly re-creates a past that is quickly slipping away. The folk artist known for her stunning headdresses, as well as beautiful beadwork, weaving, and embroidery - all rooted in the traditions of her beloved Ukraine - is one of the few links to that country's rich heritage. "A lot of this art has been lost," Nakonechny, 66, says, her eyes filling with tears. She sits in the front room of her modest Oxford Circle home/studio/gallery, overtaken with looms used to weave patterns of yore.
NEWS
November 23, 2004 | By Mark McDonald INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Tens of thousands of protesters in the Ukrainian capital, Kiev, braved freezing temperatures yesterday to denounce the apparent victory of the government candidate in Ukraine's presidential election. With nearly all votes counted, Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovich led opposition candidate Viktor Yushchenko by nearly 3 percentage points, according to the Central Election Commission. Exit polls Sunday night had given the challenger a big lead. But it evaporated overnight as election officials counted the paper ballots.
NEWS
May 22, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
KIEV, Ukraine - The crowds are gone from Independence Square, known as the Maidan, where massive demonstrations unseated a Ukrainian president. Yet the signs of struggle remain, sprawling across the Maidan and the surrounding streets: the tents and soup kitchens, the piles of black tires and debris, and the posters of the youthful dead on walls and makeshift shrines that are adorned daily with fresh flowers. Pay attention to this revolution. The Kremlin has tried to crush it by dismembering Ukraine and mounting a fierce propaganda campaign that falsely labels the uprising "fascist.
NEWS
December 26, 1991 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
Below the soaring blue dome, the strains of the Ukrainian choir swelling from the rear balcony mixed with the voices of the white-robed priests up front. The voices sang in the language of the old country, but spoke of a new country. "Everybody was hoping for so long we would have an independent Ukraine," Bruno Dankowsi said in an accent thick with a life spent in Ukraine until 1939. "It's better now. We're glad we have our independent Ukraine. " Among the wooden pews of the Ukrainian Catholic Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, 830 N. Franklin St., more than 300 Christmas worshipers knelt yesterday, still bundled against the morning chill in overcoats, kerchiefs, scarves and fur hats.
NEWS
May 1, 1986 | By Mark Jaffe, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Ukraine - the scene of what appears to be the world's worst nuclear accident - is the richest agricultural area in the Soviet Union and one of the country's most densely populated areas. Despite the accident, though, agricultural experts and scientists believe that, based on the informationthat has emerged, the country's food production areas have not yet been seriously endangered. "It appears that the radioactive air mass moved in such a way that it may have limited the impact," said Lester Brown, director of the Worldwatch Institute and a noted agricultural economist.
NEWS
May 4, 1988 | By T.J. McCarthy, Special to The Inquirer
As nearly as Olga Prychka can render it in Ukrainian, it's "Nova Jersey ee te - znamunuto razom. " Translation: "New Jersey and You - Perfect Together. " Soviet citizens will have a chance to ponder that assertion next week, according to Prychka. She and her husband, Peter, of Stratford, will leave Tuesday with nine other New Jersey residents on a 16-day "friendship mission" to the Ukraine. The travelers plan to present their hosts with gifts that are typical of New Jersey, so the items being packed include saltwater taffy, Lenox china and packages of information from the state Division of Travel and Tourism.
NEWS
May 1, 1986 | By KEVIN HANEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Members of the local Ukrainian community have been frustrated so far in efforts to contact friends and relatives in the Ukraine and send relief in the wake of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor disaster, a local Ukrainian-Americ an activist said last night. Ulana Mazurkevich, chairwoman of the Ukrainian-American Human Rights Committee, based in Philadelphia, said attempts to place calls to the Ukraine have been unsuccessful since Monday night. "Everyone that calls, from Washington, from Chicago, they can't get through," she said.
SPORTS
June 12, 2012 | The Inquirer Staff
Andriy Shevchenko is determined to turn the European Championship into a farewell performance to remember, and so far he's putting on quite a show. The 35-year-old, the oldest striker in the tournament, one-upped Zlatan Ibrahimovic on Monday in a battle of past and present stars, scoring two great headers to give co-host Ukraine a 2-1 win over Sweden in their opening match at Euro 2012 in Kiev. After Ibrahimovic had given Sweden the lead in the 52d minute, Shevchenko responded by heading in the equalizer just three minutes later and then added the winner in the 62d. It was an unexpectedly upbeat start for the cohost's home event, which is Shevchenko's last in Ukraine's yellow-and-blue uniform.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 9, 2016
A story Sunday about the Lego robotics championship at the University of Pennsylvania gave an incorrect name for the event. It is the FIRST Lego League. A story Sunday about criticism of campaign donations to U.S. Senate candidate Katie McGinty incorrectly mentioned questions about contributions from political action committees tied to the energy industry. One critic did cite a donation from the political arm of Iberdrola, a utility and wind power company where McGinty once worked.
NEWS
October 19, 2015
ISSUE | TEMPLE Let adjuncts decide As a Temple University alumnus and employee for the last 10 years, I am calling on the university to let me and my fellow adjunct professors vote on joining the faculty union without a campaign of false information and intimidation ("Adjunct faculty at Temple win right to hold union election," Philly.com, Sept. 30). The majority of adjunct professors filed for a union election with the Pennsylvania Labor Relations Board in December 2014. We want a union because we deserve fair pay, respect, and a voice in our workplace.
NEWS
August 18, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Even on a steamy summer Sunday, Vitaly Korchevsky typically would be buttoned up in suit and tie, preaching from the pulpit at the Slavic Evangelical Baptist Church in Brookhaven. But Sunday, another pastor took his place and read a letter to the congregation from the now-jailed Korchevsky. "Brothers and sisters," the stand-in pastor read softly, as babies gurgled and some worshipers' tears started to flow. Some bowed their heads in prayer. Others shot stern looks at children to hush their playing in the pews at the packed church on Edwards Avenue, a quiet residential street in this Delaware County suburb.
NEWS
June 5, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
'I can tell you outright and unequivocally that there are no Russian troops in Ukraine," Russian President Vladimir Putin told a live TV audience in April. He was flat-out lying. Moscow has armed and directed the so-called "rebel forces" in eastern Ukraine and bolstered them with its own troops. Thousands of Russian troops are massing on Ukraine's eastern border, possibly poised for a further invasion. Yet Western leaders still won't publicly challenge Putin's lies. "If you don't call it by what it is, there is less pressure to confront the real issues," John Herbst, the former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine, told me this week.
NEWS
February 26, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal jury convicted two Ukrainian brothers Tuesday for their roles in a human-trafficking organization that lured its victims to the United States with promises of stable jobs, only to treat them like slaves and put them to work for little to no pay. Mykhaylo Botsvynyuk, 46, and Yaroslav Botsvynyuk, 47, ensured their workers' continued labor with beatings, sexual assaults, and threats sent to family in Eastern Europe, prosecutors said....
NEWS
January 30, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
The rockets that killed dozens of civilians in the Ukrainian port city of Mariupol last weekend also blew up the futile Western strategy for stopping Russian aggression in Ukraine. President Obama and his European allies desperately hoped that sanctions would squeeze Vladimir Putin into accepting a negotiated solution to the conflict. They were dreaming that he would press Russian-backed separatists in Ukraine to abide by the so-called Minsk cease-fire agreement signed in September by representatives of Ukraine, Russia, and Europe.
NEWS
September 22, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
When Ukraine President Petro Poroshenko addressed a joint session of Congress last week, he called on members to support Ukrainian freedom and democracy. They stood and cheered. Ukrainians must "live free or die," the president said, using a slogan from the American Revolution to describe his struggle with "rebels" who have taken over the eastern regions of his country. In reality, these separatists are Russian proxies, whom the Kremlin armed and organized in an effort to drag Kiev back into Moscow's orbit.
NEWS
September 16, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a tenuous cease-fire agreement remained in place Sunday between Ukraine forces and pro-Russian separatists, about 100 members of local Ukrainian, Russian, Lithuanian, and Georgian communities gathered near Independence Hall in Philadelphia to express solidarity with one another. The rally was held in protest of recent actions taken by Russian President Vladimir Putin, who has been accused of invading Ukraine on several fronts. Putin has denied the accusation, but media outlets have documented Russian soldiers in parts of the country.
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
In 1949, George Orwell published Nineteen Eighty-Four , his famous portrait of a totalitarian regime whose "Ministry of Truth" spews rank propaganda called "Newspeak" that turns historical facts on their head. Newspeak has been alive and well these past weeks in Moscow, where President Vladimir Putin flatly denied any Russian presence in Ukraine, even as thousands of Russian troops and heavy weapons invaded that country. What's more disturbing is that NATO leaders meeting in Wales last week to discuss Ukraine refused to denounce Putin's aggression as an "invasion.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2014 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
Yards of yarn, goose feathers by the fistful, even a few cowrie shells - with these and more, Vera Nakonechny painstakingly re-creates a past that is quickly slipping away. The folk artist known for her stunning headdresses, as well as beautiful beadwork, weaving, and embroidery - all rooted in the traditions of her beloved Ukraine - is one of the few links to that country's rich heritage. "A lot of this art has been lost," Nakonechny, 66, says, her eyes filling with tears. She sits in the front room of her modest Oxford Circle home/studio/gallery, overtaken with looms used to weave patterns of yore.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|