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Ulcerative Colitis

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NEWS
August 13, 1999 | By Huntly Collins, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Scientists at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School have discovered that a class of diabetes drugs already on the market can virtually cure ulcerative colitis in mice. The findings, which surprised researchers at Penn's Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center, have prompted the research team to begin a small clinical trial of one of the drugs, called rosiglitazone, in people suffering from ulcerative colitis. If it succeeds, the approach would be a breakthrough for the estimated 500,000 Americans who suffer from ulcerative colitis, which affects the colon, and for another 500,000 with Crohn's disease, which involves the entire gastrointestinal tract.
NEWS
September 23, 2011
Horsham-based Janssen Biotech Inc., received approval from the Food and Drug Administration to sell Remicade for the treatment of children over age six who suffer from moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis and haven't responded to other medicine. Remicade is made at a plant in Malvern. Between 50,000 and 100,000 U.S. children have inflammatory bowel disease, of which 40 percent have ulcerative colitis.    - David Sell  
NEWS
March 19, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The health hazards of smoking are well-known, but a new study may have identified the first apparent hazard of kicking the habit - an increased risk of a rare but serious intestinal disease called ulcerative colitis. The study also shows that people who continue to smoke have a somewhat lower risk of the disease than do those who never smoked. However, those who conducted the study cautioned that it does not mean that smokers should keep smoking, because the advantages of quitting still far outweigh this single drawback.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2011
In the Region Giant to shut 2 area stores Two Philadelphia-area supermarkets acquired in 2006 by Giant Food Stores in a sell-off by Clemens Markets will shut down in the next several weeks. The Abington Giant on York Road will close on Oct. 8, and Foodsource on Lancaster Avenue in Bryn Mawr is to shut on Oct. 22, Giant Food Stores announced. The Carlisle, Pa.-based chain called the formats of the soon-to-be-decommissioned stores "outmoded" and said employees would be offered positions in nearby newer and brighter stores.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Big pharmaceutical companies strike licensing deals with small companies in hopes of finding new, highly profitable medicine without the cost of buying a whole company. Small companies get funding other ways, such as venture capital firms, but the money from licensing arrangements can mean the difference between continuing operations and closing shop. Sometimes these deals work, sometimes not. Last week presented four examples, three starting and one ending (badly), involving the drugmakers GlaxoSmithKline, Johnson & Johnson, Pfizer, and AstraZeneca, all of which have significant Philadelphia-area operations.
NEWS
August 3, 2012
NEWARK, N.J. - Jurors have awarded more than $1 million to a New Jersey state trooper who filed a whistle-blower lawsuit. The lawyer for retired Detective Sgt. 1st Class Brian Royster says that jurors in Essex County on Wednesday found that the State Police and Superintendent Col. Rick Fuentes violated the act, which aims to protect those who speak out. Royster, who is black, filed suit in 2005. The 48-year-old claimed that cases pending with the Equal Employment Opportunity and Affirmative Action unit were stalled without reason and troopers accused of misconduct had been allowed to retire instead of being disciplined.
SPORTS
October 8, 1994 | By Tim Panaccio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If there's one thing Villanova seems to have gotten used to, it's knowing that it won't have the same starting quarterback an entire season. Redshirt junior Tom Marchese will make his second start today in Storrs, Conn., where Andy Talley's Wildcats (3-2 overall) will be looking to even their Yankee Conference record at 2-2 when they face Skip Holtz's Connecticut Huskies (1-4, 1-1). Villanova has not had the same starting quarterback for an entire season since Tom Colombo went 12 games in 1991.
NEWS
November 25, 1995
PROPERTY OWNERS SHOULD PAY TO FIX WATER RUNOFF Stephen Kunz's Nov. 18 letter ("Save our natural resources from special interests"), about lax enforcement of environmental regulations and the sacrifice of natural resources by special interests, was on target. The latest example of such laxity and environmental sacrifice is Cherry Hill Township's proposed Kingston Estates flood-control project. The project will waste $3.4 million in public tax dollars to solve what is largely a private-property problem.
NEWS
December 7, 2010
Henry G. "Buddy" Herling, 83, of Somerton, former commissioner of the Department of Licenses and Inspections, died of heart failure Thursday, Dec. 2, at Lafayette-Redeemer Hospice. Mr. Herling spent much of his career serving the city, first as an electrician, then as a firefighter for four years, before becoming a civil engineer and fire-code specialist. In 1980, he was appointed deputy commissioner of L&I, and became commissioner in 1985. After leaving the department in 1988, he was a consultant for 20 years for the Philadelphia Industrial Development Corp.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2006 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Spring House start-up that is developing nonantibiotic therapies for gastrointestinal diseases has received a $500,000 investment from BioAdvance, the Philadelphia region's life-sciences "greenhouse. " Midway Pharmaceuticals is a biopharmaceutical firm focusing on drugs for GI diseases, including Crohn's, ulcerative colitis, and irritable-bowel syndrome. Midway's experimental compound, the polymer MDY-1001, inhibits bacteria in the GI tract and potentially could create nonantibiotic, nonimmunosuppressive therapies to treat a variety of GI disorders.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2013
A LONE WOMAN stood in the middle of the Benjamin Franklin Bridge one frigid January day, looking down at the Delaware River. Something seemed off to a police officer bicycling past, so he followed the woman. But this wasn't some troubled soul looking for a quick way out. It was NBC10's Lu Ann Cahn. And although Cahn, then 53, was all too familiar with feelings of despair, she wasn't suicidal. In fact, she was outside on that cold afternoon because she had been in a funk and had come up with a clever way to get herself out of it: She would do something new every day during the year 2010.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Big pharmaceutical companies strike licensing deals with small companies in hopes of finding new, highly profitable medicine without the cost of buying a whole company. Small companies get funding other ways, such as venture capital firms, but the money from licensing arrangements can mean the difference between continuing operations and closing shop. Sometimes these deals work, sometimes not. Last week presented four examples, three starting and one ending (badly), involving the drugmakers GlaxoSmithKline, Johnson & Johnson, Pfizer, and AstraZeneca, all of which have significant Philadelphia-area operations.
NEWS
August 3, 2012
NEWARK, N.J. - Jurors have awarded more than $1 million to a New Jersey state trooper who filed a whistle-blower lawsuit. The lawyer for retired Detective Sgt. 1st Class Brian Royster says that jurors in Essex County on Wednesday found that the State Police and Superintendent Col. Rick Fuentes violated the act, which aims to protect those who speak out. Royster, who is black, filed suit in 2005. The 48-year-old claimed that cases pending with the Equal Employment Opportunity and Affirmative Action unit were stalled without reason and troopers accused of misconduct had been allowed to retire instead of being disciplined.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2012
Special Events A Night of Urban Farming and Astronomy Tour the Teens 4 Good Farm & learn about the night sky. Teens 4 Good Farm, 800 Poplar St. 4/27. 6 pm. Annual Spring IBD Education Day Health specialists will explore aspects of living with Crohn's disease & ulcerative colitis, inflammatory bowel disease. Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, 111 S. 11th St. 4/29. 9 am-1 pm. Annual Wissahickon Creek Clean Up Help clean the Creek, enjoy a picnic afterward.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2011
In the Region Giant to shut 2 area stores Two Philadelphia-area supermarkets acquired in 2006 by Giant Food Stores in a sell-off by Clemens Markets will shut down in the next several weeks. The Abington Giant on York Road will close on Oct. 8, and Foodsource on Lancaster Avenue in Bryn Mawr is to shut on Oct. 22, Giant Food Stores announced. The Carlisle, Pa.-based chain called the formats of the soon-to-be-decommissioned stores "outmoded" and said employees would be offered positions in nearby newer and brighter stores.
NEWS
September 23, 2011
Horsham-based Janssen Biotech Inc., received approval from the Food and Drug Administration to sell Remicade for the treatment of children over age six who suffer from moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis and haven't responded to other medicine. Remicade is made at a plant in Malvern. Between 50,000 and 100,000 U.S. children have inflammatory bowel disease, of which 40 percent have ulcerative colitis.    - David Sell  
NEWS
December 7, 2010
Henry G. "Buddy" Herling, 83, of Somerton, former commissioner of the Department of Licenses and Inspections, died of heart failure Thursday, Dec. 2, at Lafayette-Redeemer Hospice. Mr. Herling spent much of his career serving the city, first as an electrician, then as a firefighter for four years, before becoming a civil engineer and fire-code specialist. In 1980, he was appointed deputy commissioner of L&I, and became commissioner in 1985. After leaving the department in 1988, he was a consultant for 20 years for the Philadelphia Industrial Development Corp.
NEWS
August 7, 2007 | By Emilie Lounsberry and Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Myra Morton told police investigating her husband's shooting death early Sunday in Whitpain Township that he had recently taken a second wife in Morocco and was to have traveled there that very day, according to court papers released yesterday. In documents that painted a sad portrait of their marriage, Myra Morton said her husband, Jereleigh Morton, had persuaded her to approve the marriage, as required by her Muslim religion. "I go give him the permission because he argues with me when I protest this marriage," read a handwritten note found by detectives at the Morton home.
NEWS
June 25, 2007 | By DAVE DAVIES, daviesd@phillynews.com 215-854-2595
WHEN THE U.S Department of Housing and Urban Development told the city in 2005 that it had violated federal relocation law in dealing with Ed and Debbie Munoz, the city told the feds to take a hike. The Munozes, whose Juniata Park business was in the path of a planned housing development, complained that they'd lost their business, home and savings in part because the city had kept them in the dark for two years about plans to take their property. And they said the city had failed to apprise them of their legal rights to relocation expenses and business counseling at a time when it would have made a difference.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2006 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Spring House start-up that is developing nonantibiotic therapies for gastrointestinal diseases has received a $500,000 investment from BioAdvance, the Philadelphia region's life-sciences "greenhouse. " Midway Pharmaceuticals is a biopharmaceutical firm focusing on drugs for GI diseases, including Crohn's, ulcerative colitis, and irritable-bowel syndrome. Midway's experimental compound, the polymer MDY-1001, inhibits bacteria in the GI tract and potentially could create nonantibiotic, nonimmunosuppressive therapies to treat a variety of GI disorders.
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