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Ultrasound

SPORTS
February 19, 2001 | by Paul Hagen Daily News Sports Writer
Talk about not getting a chance to prove yourself in spring training. When Clemente Alvarez reported to the Carpenter Complex last Thursday, he was called into assistant general manager Ruben Amaro's office before he ever went on the field, and asked if he wanted to be the team's bullpen catcher this season. "I guess they thought I had no chance to make the team," deadpanned the 32-year-old non-roster invitee. After mulling it over for a few days, Alvarez accepted the offer yesterday.
NEWS
February 14, 1995 | BY KATHLEEN SHEA Daily News wire services contributed to this report
HEEBY JEEBY: Ever feel like you're completely losing it? Shortness of breath, sense of suffocation. Dizziness, faintness, heart palpitations. Tremors, sweats, nausea, diarrhea. Hot flashes, chills, numbness, tingling. How about fear you're dying? Fear of acting crazy or going crazy? A sense of unreality - like you're an outsider looking in on your own life? These, the Washington Post quotes experts as saying, are the symptoms of panic disorder, which is suffered by 2 to 3 percent of the population.
NEWS
November 22, 2002
Turn to successful districts for improvement Your newspaper is to be commended for the excellent article by Kathy Boccella on efforts to address the problem of dangerously overloaded children's backpacks ("Seeking a solution for the overbooked," Nov. 15). I was not attracted to the idea of replacing textbooks with handouts and worksheets, as I believe we have already traveled too far down the path of dumbing down our schools. Special mention should be made of Haddonfield's approach of letting parents buy or rent an extra set of texts to keep at home.
NEWS
May 3, 2004 | MICHELLE MALKIN
ACTRESS Ashley Judd went to Washington a week ago wearing a crucifix and a trendy little T-shirt that boasted: "THIS IS WHAT A FEMINIST LOOKS LIKE. " AP snapped a photo of Ashley, honored guest of the "March for Women's Lives," that has been widely disseminated. Pro-abortion leaders must be ecstatic. In a sea of angry (Hillary Rodham Clinton), haggard (Cybill Shepherd) and ghoulish (Whoopi Goldberg) women shaking their fists and waving coat hangers, Ashley's pretty smile helped put a softer, gentler and more glamorous spin on the morbid march for "reproductive rights.
NEWS
March 28, 2012
NOT TO SHOCK anyone, but is Gov. Corbett, despite falling poll numbers, doing a balanced job of governing at a time of extreme divisiveness? I raise the question after a close look at a recent poll of Corbett's performance in office, and after noting complaints about him from both the left and the right. First, the complaints. The left, if you haven't noticed, rails about what it calls Corbett's draconian cuts in social services and education, especially higher education, and his support of legislation requiring women seeking abortions to undergo ultrasounds.
NEWS
February 23, 2012 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
I WAS GOING to begin this column as a plea to Rick Santorum to shut the hell up already. Stop, I was going to beg Sen. McSweaterVest, with the nonsense that contraception is evil "because it's a license to do things in a sexual realm that is counter to how things are supposed to be. " Which he believes to be sex for procreation only. So, will Santorum move to the sofa after wife Karen is menopausal and her dusty ovaries have coughed out their last eggs? Enough, I was going to add, with the lunacy that public education is "anachronistic.
NEWS
July 14, 1999 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In winter, the South Pole Station is the closest thing Earth has to a space colony. There are no television, no newspapers and limited telephone time. For nearly six months there are no sunlight and no escape, not even for someone who gets hurt or sick. Officials reaffirmed yesterday that a 47-year-old woman now stuck at the South Pole after discovering a possibly cancerous lump in her breast must wait until fall (spring down there) to come back. No one has ever attempted a winter landing at the South Pole, because airplanes can't function in the typical winter temperatures, which average minus 80. Darkness, high winds and blinding snowdrifts add to the peril.
NEWS
June 5, 1995 | By Gilbert M. Gaul and Susan Q. Stranahan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Albert Migliori, a fast-talking, wire-haired physicist with a secret in his basement, is in a hurry. There's a turbo molecular pump to finish pulling apart. A printout of an experiment to check. And a balky piece of machinery to fix. All before he has to pick up the kids. A quick look at his watch shows he has 15 minutes. "OK," he says, clearing a space among the mounds of gadgets, tools and spare parts that are a signature of his small Los Alamos lab, "plenty of time.
NEWS
October 25, 2008 | By Michael Vitez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ruby Spencer has a tumor so large that it makes the slender, 61-year-old widow look, in her words, "five months pregnant. " The "abdominal pelvic complex cystic mass," as the ultrasound report calls it, measures 32 to 35 centimeters - the size of a football - and may be malignant. Everyone she has seen sent her somewhere else. The emergency room at Temple University Hospital referred her to a city clinic and back to a state welfare office and then sent her home. She had no insurance.
NEWS
October 25, 2008 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ruby Spencer has a tumor so large that it makes the slender, 61-year-old widow look, in her words, "five months pregnant. " The "abdominal pelvic complex cystic mass," as the ultrasound report calls it, measures 32 to 35 centimeters - the size of a football - and may be malignant. Everyone she has seen sent her somewhere else. The emergency room at Temple University Hospital referred her to a city clinic and back to a state welfare office and then sent her home. She had no insurance.
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