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Ultrasound

NEWS
July 14, 1999 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In winter, the South Pole Station is the closest thing Earth has to a space colony. There are no television, no newspapers and limited telephone time. For nearly six months there are no sunlight and no escape, not even for someone who gets hurt or sick. Officials reaffirmed yesterday that a 47-year-old woman now stuck at the South Pole after discovering a possibly cancerous lump in her breast must wait until fall (spring down there) to come back. No one has ever attempted a winter landing at the South Pole, because airplanes can't function in the typical winter temperatures, which average minus 80. Darkness, high winds and blinding snowdrifts add to the peril.
NEWS
June 5, 1999 | by Theresa Conroy, Daily News Staff Writer
Congratulations Ms. Round-tree, it's a girl! DNA test results completed yesterday proved that the infant born to Leilani Round-tree and John Cabrera at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania was, indeed, their own child. "The DNA test results are consistent with our belief, from the beginning, that the mother has her own baby," a hospital spokesperson said in a statement yesterday. Mother and baby were still in the hospital yesterday, and it was uncertain when they would be released, the parents' attorney said.
BUSINESS
June 4, 1998 | By Karl Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As team doctor for the Philadelphia Eagles and the Philadelphia Flyers, Arthur R. Bartolozzi is used to reviewing a stream of medical products touted to help athletes recover from injury. Nothing he had seen had speeded up the healing of fractures. Until now. Over the last year, Bartolozzi, an orthopedic surgeon, has tried a small, palm-sized device that bombards a fracture with ultrasound. He has used the unit on six patients, including two professional athletes, and all have had good results, he said.
NEWS
February 20, 1998 | by Tonya Pendleton, Daily News Staff Writer
When MTV debuted 17 years ago, it offered nothing more than kinetic deejays and 'round-the-clock videos. Now the channel boasts a variety of shows that have become embedded in pop culture - everything from "Beavis and Butt-head" to "Road Rules.' In some recent retooling, the channel's programmers decided the focus had strayed too far from music and dumped buff but superficial deejays Simon Rex and Idalis. A new video-intensive show, "12 Angry Viewers" was born, on which disaffected viewers make their own video picks, and "MTV Live" debuted, featuring deejays with less beauty but more musical knowledge.
NEWS
April 19, 1996 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As soon as the Food and Drug Administration announced approval of a powerful ultrasound machine to help diagnose suspicious breast lumps, women around the country began calling their doctors. "Do you have the machine? Who does?" they asked. The FDA's action last week and clamor for the machine should pressure American physicians to stop relying on biopsy - a minor but costly, painful surgery - to distinguish cancerous from noncancerous lumps. The FDA says the high-definition ultrasound device, made by Advanced Technology Laboratories of Seattle, could reduce by 40 percent the 700,000 biopsies performed annually in this country.
NEWS
April 13, 1996 | By Lauran Neergaard, ASSOCIATED PRESS Inquirer staff writer Marie McCullough contributed to this article
The Food and Drug Administration approved a powerful ultrasound yesterday to help doctors determine when lumps in women's breasts are noncancerous, so those women can skip a common surgical cancer test. Advanced Technology Laboratories has predicted that its High-Definition Imaging, or HDI, ultrasound eventually will cut by 40 percent the number of breast biopsies performed annually in the United States. Of the 700,000 women who annually undergo biopsies, 180,000 are diagnosed with breast cancer.
LIVING
March 4, 1996 | By Cathleen Egan, FOR THE INQUIRER
Imagine an instrument that, when placed on someone's skin, could see into a wound, much like an ultrasound reveals a fetus inside the womb. Such technology could mean the early diagnosis and treatment of infection - a significant development for millions of people. For diabetics, it could mean saving a limb from amputation. For car accident victims, it could mean quick and better responses to spinal cord injuries. And for patients with bedsores, such a machine could mean early relief of pain and prevention of serious complications.
NEWS
September 18, 1995 | By Katherine Dowling
I ask every one of them, lying on their backs with that telltale bulge, "So, would you like a boy or a girl?" It's a question that passes the time as I measure the height of their uteruses and prepare to listen for their babies' heartbeats. Over the years, I've accumulated a bunch of crude statistics on their replies. The most common answer is, "I don't care what it is, as long as it's healthy," followed by, "My husband (or boyfriend) wants a boy. " A couple of women have even lashed out with the comment that they wouldn't wish a female sex on their poor innocent babies; women just suffer too much in this world.
NEWS
June 5, 1995 | By Gilbert M. Gaul and Susan Q. Stranahan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Albert Migliori, a fast-talking, wire-haired physicist with a secret in his basement, is in a hurry. There's a turbo molecular pump to finish pulling apart. A printout of an experiment to check. And a balky piece of machinery to fix. All before he has to pick up the kids. A quick look at his watch shows he has 15 minutes. "OK," he says, clearing a space among the mounds of gadgets, tools and spare parts that are a signature of his small Los Alamos lab, "plenty of time.
LIVING
April 24, 1995 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
It probably was inevitable that someone would start making and marketing keepsake ultrasound videos of fetuses in the womb, carefully edited with music, fancy graphics and even subtitles for showing-and-telling by expectant parents. But this is one idea the Food and Drug Administration vigorously has been trying to stifle. The FDA has sent warning letters to several companies, threatening to seize ultrasound equipment if the practices don't cease. The equipment is used to produce a picture of the fetus, then the images are put on videotape.
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