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Ulysses

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1996 | By Seymour I. Toll, FOR THE INQUIRER
Today is Bloomsday, the day in 1904 James Joyce chose as the time of his great novel Ulysses. Although the book is a monumental literary achievement, its history is quite another story. Honoring Joyce's literary sainthood, celebrations today conjure Poldy Bloom, his yes-saying wife Molly and the misty mews of Dublin. In the most devout quarters such as Philadelphia's Rosenbach Museum & Library (owner of the Ulysses manuscripts), torchbearers will run relays of readings of the sacred text, their praise for Joyce gushing like Guinness from the taps of every pub in Dublin.
NEWS
June 13, 2004 | By Frank Wilson INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The language of Ulysses is its glory, but also its challenge. It ranges from the limpidly beautiful - "the heaventree of stars hung with humid nightblue fruit" - to the formidably opaque: "the like way is all hidden when we would backward see from what region of remoteness the whatness of our whoness hath fetched his whenceness. " David Butler, the education officer at Dublin's James Joyce Centre, says the book is "about how language surrounds us and conditions us . . . how we're within language.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1995 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sixty Philadelphians have signed up to read excerpts from James Joyce's novel Ulysses tomorrow from the steps of the Rosenbach Museum and Library, and a lot of Irish names are on the list. Names such as Conner (Lester), Dempsey (Deborah), Dewane (Patrick), Doran (Mary), Durkan (Michael), Ginty (James), Mahaffey (Vicki), McGreal (Austin and Margaret), Ryan (Patrick), Slattery (Thomas) and Whelan (Patrick). But you don't have to be Irish to love James Joyce. Among other names on the list are: Abraham (Lynne)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1994 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On June 16, 1904, Leopold Bloom, a quintessentially ordinary man living in Dublin, spends the day doing quintessentially ordinary things, in James Joyce's extraordinary novel Ulysses. He feeds the cat. He makes breakfast for himself and his wife, Molly - tea and toast for her and pork kidneys for himself. He goes to the "jakes," as the Irish call the outhouse. He walks to his job as an ad canvasser. For lunch he has a Gorgonzola cheese sandwich and a glass of wine. He walks along the beach and gazes at the girls.
NEWS
February 27, 1997 | By Roland Merullo
Great novels often reflect the society in which they are set, as well as offering some kind of universal commentary. We can read them as a complement to history textbooks, and, like the study of history, they can offer us valuable lessons about the life we are living now. Seventy-five years ago this month, James Joyce's huge, dense, irreverent epic, Ulysses, was published in Paris by Sylvia Beach's bookstore, Shakespeare and Company. The pricey limited edition, the radically experimental structure of the novel, and the obscenity and censorship questions the book raised made Joyce an international literary figure almost overnight.
NEWS
June 16, 1995 | by Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer
Consider this novel, urges Marian Eide, that touches on themes both wonderful - "love, chance encounters, drinking" - and terrible - "racism, homophobia, anti-Semitism, adultery. " A novel that's "a celebration of the urban environment. " Could be a book about our own Philadelphia, A.D. 1995. But it's about Dublin - Dublin, Ireland, on June 16, 1904. That's the setting for James Joyce's infamous 1922 novel "Ulysses," which is celebrated this day each year by fans of literature, Irish culture, love, chance encounters and the rest.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
  Sharr White's Annapurna (simultaneously running off-Broadway) is named for a mountain in the Himalayas. But this two-character play, in a fine production by Theatre Exile that opened Thursday, takes place high up in the Rockies, in Colorado - an odd place, given the altitude, for someone who needs an oxygen tank to breathe. That's where we find Ulysses (the extraordinary Pearce Bunting), a poet, clearly dying of emphysema and lung cancer. We meet him wearing nothing but a little greasy apron under his beer belly, a stained bandage across his chest, and the oxygen tank.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2014 | By Zoë Miller, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maya Lang's debut novel, The Sixteenth of June , is a literary bridge between the City of Brotherly Love and James Joyce's enigmatic masterpiece Ulysses . Set in Philadelphia, Lang's book follows a pair of brothers (and the younger brother's fiancée) through a single day, the Joycean holiday of Bloomsday, June 16, from their grandmother's funeral in the morning to their parents' extravagant Bloomsday fete in the evening, a perennial affair at the family's Delancey manse.
NEWS
July 30, 1998 | By Jonathan Yardley
One reader wonders why Gone With the Wind didn't make what is rapidly becoming known as "The List. " Another asks about the omission of Evelyn Waugh's Sword of Honor trilogy. Several bring up the names of Flannery O'Connor and Eudora Welty, while yet another complains that, even though he is scarcely an ignoramus or a buffoon, the very top of the list is reserved for a book he simply cannot read. So here's my dirty little secret: I can't read it, either. "It" is Ulysses, which a panel of judges laboring on behalf of the Modern Library has chosen as the greatest novel of the 20th century in the English language.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bloomsday, the literary celebration of James Joyce's modernist classic Ulysses , is held across the world every June 16. From Australia to Hungary, from the Czech Republic to Philadelphia, fans gather to read and discuss Joyce's allusive, poetical, musical, and often elusive work. The local Bloomsday event features a daylong reading of passages from the novel by more than 75 local men and women drawn from every walk of life at three locations - the steps of the Free Library of Philadelphia's Central Library, Rittenhouse Square, and the Rosenbach Museum & Library.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bloomsday, the literary celebration of James Joyce's modernist classic Ulysses , is held across the world every June 16. From Australia to Hungary, from the Czech Republic to Philadelphia, fans gather to read and discuss Joyce's allusive, poetical, musical, and often elusive work. The local Bloomsday event features a daylong reading of passages from the novel by more than 75 local men and women drawn from every walk of life at three locations - the steps of the Free Library of Philadelphia's Central Library, Rittenhouse Square, and the Rosenbach Museum & Library.
NEWS
June 11, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
THERE WASN'T a lot of information available last night on the scumbag who ran down Michael Toner early yesterday and kept driving. But there was plenty of information available on Toner, a talented actor whose love of James Joyce is well-known - he had even carried a copy of Ulysses with him as a young soldier trekking through the jungles of Vietnam. Last night, Toner, 68, was in critical condition at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, hours after someone hit him as he tried to cross a rain-soaked street in Center City.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2014 | By Zoë Miller, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maya Lang's debut novel, The Sixteenth of June , is a literary bridge between the City of Brotherly Love and James Joyce's enigmatic masterpiece Ulysses . Set in Philadelphia, Lang's book follows a pair of brothers (and the younger brother's fiancée) through a single day, the Joycean holiday of Bloomsday, June 16, from their grandmother's funeral in the morning to their parents' extravagant Bloomsday fete in the evening, a perennial affair at the family's Delancey manse.
NEWS
June 16, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
'Dubliners is one of the great books of the 20th century. " Bracing words from Colum McCann, a National Book Award-winning novelist ( Let the Great World Spin ). Sunday is the 100th anniversary of the publication of James Joyce's Dubliners , by the London house Grant Richards on June 15, 1914. It comes a day before Bloomsday, the day on which Joyce's Ulysses takes place. The Rosenbach Museum and Library is in the midst of a weeklong Bloomsday celebration (bit.ly/1kxQkrP)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
  Sharr White's Annapurna (simultaneously running off-Broadway) is named for a mountain in the Himalayas. But this two-character play, in a fine production by Theatre Exile that opened Thursday, takes place high up in the Rockies, in Colorado - an odd place, given the altitude, for someone who needs an oxygen tank to breathe. That's where we find Ulysses (the extraordinary Pearce Bunting), a poet, clearly dying of emphysema and lung cancer. We meet him wearing nothing but a little greasy apron under his beer belly, a stained bandage across his chest, and the oxygen tank.
NEWS
April 11, 2013
Milo O'Shea, 86, a versatile Dublin-born stage and screen actor known for his famously bristling, agile eyebrows and roles in such disparate films as Ulysses , Barbarella , and Franco Zeffirelli's Romeo and Juliet, died Tuesday, April 2, in New York after a short illness, according to Irish news accounts. Familiar both in starring and supporting roles, Mr. O'Shea, who also appeared in many popular television series, including Cheers, Frasier, The West Wing, and The Golden Girls.
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
To be honest, it had long been a dream of Rosenbach Museum curator Patrick Rodgers to acquire a copy of Maurice Sendak's In the Night Kitchen with the little Mickey penises cut out. After all, censorship of the book was part of Sendak history, and the Rosenbach houses the author's papers and materials. Who knew that Stephen Colbert would be the one to fulfill that wish? Or that the lure of Colbert's hip and multitudinous audience, not to mention his defining interviews with Sendak only months before the writer's death in May, would lead the Rosenbach to acquire, as a result of a five-minute July 17 segment of The Colbert Report , a tiny and unlikely little piece of hipster cool?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2012 | Joe Sixpack
HE IS HONORABLE and bold and all beef. He is a star-spangled conservative American with a deep reverence for St. Ronald Reagan, "Ham" Rove and the unlimited wealth of secret Super PACs. Fittingly, Stephen Colbert drinks Bud Light Lime . Or, rather, he guzzles the stuff — bottle after bottle on the set of Comedy Central's "The Colbert Report. " He claims to take a sip of "the manliest fruit-flavored diet lager on the market" every time he says the word "nation. " This is no mere TV product placement.
NEWS
November 10, 2010 | By Art Carey, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Quadrangle is a retirement community whose name and leafy grounds evoke a college campus. The dining room resounds with literate conversation, and in the well-stocked library, an entire bookcase is filled with volumes penned by present and former residents. It's a place where people are less interested in the size of your investment portfolio than in what you're reading. A fitting site, then, for a book group bold enough to tackle a tome that has baffled generations of undergraduates and launched 10,000 master's theses and doctoral dissertations.
NEWS
April 9, 2010 | By Steven Conn
Poor Ulysses S. Grant. Saving the Union by defeating the Confederate army and being elected twice to the presidency is no longer good enough to secure a place for posterity. Some Republicans, led by North Carolina Rep. Patrick McHenry, want to take Grant's portrait off the $50 bill and replace it with Ronald Reagan's. I'd forgotten that Grant graces the $50. But Republicans handle a lot more of those bills than I do, and apparently they want to see Reagan's face every time they slap one down at a West Hollywood sex club.
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