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Umbilical Cord

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NEWS
November 9, 1998 | by Mark Angeles, Daily News Staff Writer
Kathie DeLoreto's twins saved her life while still in her womb. By preserving the precious stem cells from their umbilical cords shortly after their birth, she may someday be able to return the favor. That's the theory behind the removal and storage of umbilical cord blood, which contains stem cells - unspecialized, life-giving blood cells that produce all other cells. The relatively new procedure is not covered by insurance but is being offered by CorCell, a Camden company, to clients of such local health-care giants as Independence Blue Cross.
NEWS
July 21, 2003 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In 1988 in Paris, a boy with a life-threatening form of anemia was saved by a new, experimental therapy - a few ounces of blood from his newborn sister's umbilical cord. Soon, what had been just a waste product of childbirth was being hailed as a therapeutic miracle. Facilities for freezing and storing umbilical cord blood began to spring up around the world. Now, 15 years after that first "cord blood transplant," it is clear the procedure has several advantages over a bone marrow transplant, the older, more common way of rebuilding damaged blood and immune systems.
NEWS
October 18, 2012 | By Frank Kummer, Breaking News Desk
A mother apparently gave birth on a busy SEPTA Broad Street Line train yesterday afternoon, and walked off with the baby still attached to the umbilical cord. The mother disembarked the northbound train, climbed a set of stairs at the Olney Transportation Center, and then approached a SEPTA police officer, according to Heather Redfern, a SEPTA spokeswoman. Officer Loyd Rodgers discovered that not only was the woman holding a baby, but that the umbilical cord was attached. Rodgers and others scrambled to get the woman and baby a blanket and provide comfort.
NEWS
August 25, 2011 | By Sam Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A newborn baby abducted from the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania has been located in Southwest Philadelphia. Police found the boy, two-days-old and in need of medical attention, at a home on the 6000 block of Kingsessing Ave. The child's mother, Tanya Dixon, took the child from the hospital about noon without permission, police said. Investigators were questioning Dixon, 39, this afternoon. The child was wearing a diaper, a one-piece outfit, and an alarm sensor attached to his umbilical cord.
NEWS
April 30, 2001 | By Melanie D. Scott INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In an effort to educate African Americans and other minority groups about genetic research, the Zeta Phi Beta Sorority National Education Foundation is offering programs and forums on topics such as the Human Genome Project and the importance of minority participation. The foundation has received $115,000 in grants from private organizations and research hospitals to disseminate information about gene research and to explore its ethical, legal and social implications so that minorities will be able to make informed health decisions.
NEWS
October 23, 2011
Police are searching for the mother of a newborn baby who was found dead and wrapped in a blanket on a porch in North Philadelphia on Saturday morning. The baby girl was found shortly before 9:30 a.m. on the porch of a house on the 4900 block of North Marvine Street, in the city's Logan section. The umbilical cord was still attached to the infant, police said. There was no initial word on the cause of death, and police did not yet know the circumstances surrounding the child's being left there.
NEWS
October 17, 2000 | by Nicole Weisensee Egan, Daily News Staff Writer
Police in South Philadelphia are trying to solve the mystery of a placenta and an umbilical cord that someone found in a playground on Friday. After three days of canvassing the neighborhood and hospitals, cops can find neither a baby nor a woman who recently gave birth. "In most instances, people in the neighborhood are aware if someone had a baby or goes to the hospital to have one," said Capt. Bill Colarulo, commander of the South Detective Division. "That didn't happen and we can't find anyone who remembers someone even being pregnant.
NEWS
December 5, 1986 | By Maureen Graham, Special to The Inquirer
The remains of a newborn girl with the umbilical cord still attached were found yesterday in a dumpster behind a pizza parlor on the Black Horse Pike in Washington Township, Gloucester County, police said. The body was stuffed in a plastic trash bag and was lying at the top of the full dumpster. Police said the baby appeared to have been born within the previous 24 hours. Dr. Claus Speth, assistant state medical examiner, concluded that it had been a full-term live birth. Gloucester County Prosecutor Richard E. Hickey said late last night that the infant died of asphyxiation.
NEWS
July 13, 1989 | Daily News Wire Services
In theory, as the doctor held the newborn girl for the first minute of her life, Jennifer Johnson was feeding her daughter cocaine through the umbilical cord that still joined them. That is what a prosecutor argued yesterday during the first day of a trial in which Johnson, 23, of Altamonte Springs, Fla., faces drug delivery charges normally reserved for drug pushers. She gave birth to a daughter in January and a son in 1987; both had traces of the illegal drug in their bodies.
NEWS
August 10, 2009 | Daily News Staff Report
Pennsylvania State Troopers helped deliver a baby early Saturday inside a car they had pulled over near the Philadelphia International Airport, authorities said. Tricia Snyder and her husband were speeding in their Mazda SUV, northbound on Interstate 95 toward the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, when police began pursuing the expecting couple, police said. Once Trooper Peter Burghart pulled over the Snyders and he learned of the impending birth, he asked for medics and more units to come to the scene.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2015
I'VE HAD many conversations with black men about our commonalities and our differences, about our joys and our pain. But I've never had a conversation like the one I had with Tracy Martin, whose son, Trayvon, was killed in 2012, by neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman. Our dialogue was in turns funny and it was heartbreaking. But of all the things our conversation turned out to be, I am most grateful that it was real. Coming on the heels of the third anniversary of Trayvon's death, and the U.S. Justice Dept.
NEWS
January 22, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hyphernkemberly Dorvilier's mother and two sisters sat in the front row of Browns Mills United Methodist Church, embracing a line of people they did not know as if they were family. Many walked away wiping tears from their eyes, some crying aloud as they sat down. More than 100 gathered inside the Burlington County church Wednesday evening to honor Dorvilier's newborn daughter, Angelica, who died last week after, authorities said, Dorvilier set her on fire. "I believe there was a tear in the eye of God that evening," the Rev. Richard Esher told the grieving crowd.
NEWS
January 22, 2015 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
HER NAME means "angelic" and that's the most that anyone can hope for Angelica, the newborn who died after being lit afire on a Burlington County roadside. Baby Angelica's mother, Hyphernkemberly Dorvilier, 22, appeared in Burlington County Superior Court yesterday via video monitor from prison to face murder charges, politely answering the judge's questions with a series of "Yes, your honor," but shedding no light on the crime of which she is accused. On Friday night, Dorvilier allegedly wrapped her newborn daughter - umbilical cord and placenta still attached - in a towel and papers and set her on fire along a stretch of Simontown Road in Pemberton Township, according to an affidavit of probable cause.
NEWS
January 22, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hyphernkemberly Dorvilier kept her pregnancy a secret for months, hiding her growing stomach even from her mother and younger sister, with whom she shared a split-level Pemberton Township home. On Friday evening, Dorvilier delivered the girl - alone, authorities said - in the ground-floor bathroom, where police later found a bloody toilet and rag. She then allegedly walked to a green Land Rover in the driveway, leaving a trail of blood on the concrete, and drove a mile and a half with the baby to a neighborhood along Simontown Road.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dave Joseph was sleeping Friday night when he was awakened by his mother-in-law. She told him a car was on fire outside their home in Pemberton. Joseph looked into the darkness, he said, and saw what he thought was a brushfire in front of a parked car. Then he saw a young woman. Joseph approached and the woman said she was burning a pile of dog feces. When he ordered her to stop and leave, she poured water from a plastic bottle on the pile. That's when Joseph's wife, standing behind him, heard a baby cry. And Joseph discovered one of the most disturbing sights he has ever seen: An infant on fire.
NEWS
December 27, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
By the time the officers entered the subway car, they could see the baby's head crowning through his mother's sweatpants. A group of riders had already formed a semicircle around her, offering as much protection and comfort as they could on the Market-Frankford Line. SEPTA Police Sgt. Daniel Caban and Officer Darrell James arrived at the 15th Street station about the same time: 5:50 p.m. on Christmas. "Get your gloves ready," Caban told James. Caban, who had experienced childbirth only as an observant father, knelt and removed the woman's sweatpants as she practiced breathing exercises.
NEWS
December 26, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
"PHILLY, MY baby is coming!" A young mother-to-be screamed those frenzied words last night inside a packed Market-Frankford El train as it pulled into 15th and Market streets. Moments later, in the arms of a SEPTA Transit Police officer, her baby boy started to do some screaming of his own. And right behind them, watching the Christmas miracle, was Sunny Ali, a West Philly musician. "Some people started tearing up, saying, 'Merry Christmas,' " Ali, 29, told the Daily News . "Honestly, I started tearing up a bit, too. I was just so overwhelmed.
NEWS
August 5, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
  At 2:11 p.m. on July 23, Michael Kuttler drew his first breath and belted out an exultant scream. Seconds later, he participated in his first act of altruism - trying to save a stranger's life. His afterbirth was placed in a bin and handed to a woman who rushed down the hall in Lankenau Medical Center to a utility room. Working quickly, she swaddled the placenta in a cone of paper pads, pulled the rubbery umbilical cord through the bottom, then, using a syringe, plastic tubing, and gravity, spent the next 20 minutes collecting biological gold.
NEWS
April 21, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mason Shaffer was seven months old when doctors treated him for a fatal genetic bone disorder by destroying his blood and immune systems and rebuilding them with donated blood stem cells. That's when his parents, Sarah and Marc Shaffer of Lansdowne, learned about a fairly unsung medical trend: public, nonprofit facilities that collect, store, and distribute blood from donated umbilical cords. The stem cells that saved Mason, now a healthy 5-year-old, were in cord blood. Nonprofit cord-blood banking is a complicated, costly network, but it has been growing steadily, thanks to federal support, stem-cell research - and families like the Shaffers.
NEWS
August 2, 2013 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
MOMENTS AFTER his birth, Gary Chilutti was left for dead. Fifty-seven years later, the sadness of that fact pales in comparison to what happened next: He was found, he was loved instantly and he was wanted desperately by two wonderful couples before finally being adopted by a third wonderful couple. "I hit the jackpot with my parents," says Chilutti. "I couldn't have asked for better people. But learning about all this," he says, sifting through photos of one of the couples who'd hoped to adopt him long ago, "is just incredible.
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