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NEWS
May 21, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the last 13 years, Joan Mazzotti has made a public career of helping low-income, first-generation students from Philadelphia's public high schools get into and through college. Quietly, she and her husband, Michael Kelly, also have made it a personal mission in the case of two Haitian-born orphans, who received their degrees Sunday at Haverford College, a selective, liberal arts school on the Main Line. In true fashion as the stand-in parents they have become to Ralph and Ruben Alexis, Mazzotti and Kelly got to the ceremony early and staked out seats in the fourth row. They took video as Ralph Alexis, 21, a French major, stepped on stage at the Alumni Field House to receive his diploma along with nearly 300 graduates.
NEWS
August 3, 2011
Sharif Omar, 32, has been appointed chief executive officer of Pottstown Memorial Medical Center, effective immediately, the hospital announced today. He has been chief operating officer since 2009 and interim CEO since March. A new COO is to be announced shortly. Omar replaces John Kirby, who left to take another job. Omar had previously worked in administrative positions at Tulane University Hospital & Clinic and Southwest Medical Center and at Medical Partners International.
NEWS
July 15, 2012 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
A U.S. district judge handed prison terms Friday to the founder of a Northwest Philadelphia charter school and its former chief executive for stealing $522,000 in taxpayer money to prop up a restaurant, a health-food store, and a private school they controlled, and for defrauding a bank. Hugh C. Clark, a lawyer who helped found New Media Technology Charter School and served for many years as its board president, was sentenced to 24 months in federal prison. Ina Walker, a career educator and the charter school's former chief executive officer, was sentenced to six months in prison.
NEWS
February 15, 1999 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Mercy Community Hospital in Havertown has opened a 16-bed behavioral unit for people 55 or older who need inpatient psychiatric care. Patients typically are 65 or older and have such problems as depression, disorientation, anxiety or substance abuse, according to program director Andrea Jones. She said the unit began drawing patients as soon as it opened in late December. Behavioral-unit services include medical and psychiatric evaluation, individual and group therapy, and substance-abuse consultation.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2014 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there On a summer afternoon in 2009 at an Ocean City Shore house, Bob's friend made an announcement about that evening's Atlantic City festivities: Several Eagles cheerleaders would be joining them. "It was like, 'Oh my God! Wow! This is great!' " remembered Bob, who grew up in Voorhees. He and the other dudes put down their beverages to prepare. "There were guys doing push-ups everywhere. " As soon as Jenna walked in, Bob whispered to his friend. "You really need to hook me up here.
NEWS
July 7, 2002 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Mary Horrocks Donohue of East Bradford Township was recently named director of development, membership and communication at the Brandywine and Red Clay Valley Associations. The nonprofit Brandywine Association, founded in 1945, calls itself the oldest small watershed association in the country. Its sister organization, the Red Clay Valley Association, was founded in 1952 to preserve natural resources of the Red Clay region, a 55-square-mile area of southern Chester County and northern New Castle County, Del. Robert G. Struble Jr. is executive director of both.
NEWS
January 20, 2012
Michael L. Mussa, 67, a former chief economist for the International Monetary Fund who was known for his blunt and often witty economic assessments, died Sunday in Washington. The cause was heart failure, according to the Peterson Institute for International Economics, where Mr. Mussa had been a senior fellow since 2001. He was a member of the Council of Economic Advisers under President Ronald Reagan from 1986 to 1988. He was chief economist at the IMF from 1991 to 2001. Widely published in the field, he was well-known among economists for demonstrating that exchange rates fluctuate differently depending on whether a currency is free-floating or tied to the dollar, gold, or some other stored value.
NEWS
April 17, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
LAWRENCE, Kan. - Notre Dame tight end Mike Ragone has signed a grant-in-aid form to complete his transfer to Kansas, where he will be reunited with former coach Charlie Weis. Ragone, who was a star at Camden Catholic and a top recruit, has completed his undergraduate degree and will be eligible to play for the Jayhawks immediately. He joins quarterback Dayne Crist and linebacker Anthony McDonald as former Irish players who will finish their college careers in Lawrence. Weis recruited all three players to Notre Dame while he was the head coach in South Bend.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nicholas Sellers, 81, a lawyer, district justice, educator, and Army veteran who saw action during the Vietnam War, died of heart failure Saturday, Feb. 8, at the Hill in Whitemarsh, a continuing-care retirement community. Mr. Sellers worked as a lawyer and manager for several charitable and historical organizations, including the Society of Cincinnati of Maryland, a group devoted to preserving the legacy of those who fought for American independence. He also was a member of the First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry, which dates to 1774.
SPORTS
August 9, 2012 | By MIKE KERN and Daily News Staff Writer
WITH THE LOSS of Micheal Eric, it looked like Temple's basketball team might need some help in the frontcourt this season. It looks like coach Fran Dunphy just might have found some. Jake O'Brien, a 6-9 forward who hasn't played since December of 2010 because of foot injuries, is transferring to North Broad Street from Boston University, according to sources confirming reports in OwlScoop.com. He played three seasons there before redshirting in 2011-12, and is eligible to play immediately because he's already earned his undergraduate degree.
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SPORTS
May 12, 2015 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
Kobe Bryant tore his left Achilles tendon April 13, 2013. At the time, this news didn't mean much to Jordan Hicks, beyond his being a pro basketball fan and having a casual interest in Bryant's health. Five months later, it meant everything to him. Hicks, a linebacker whom the Eagles drafted in the third round this year out of Texas, tore his left Achilles tendon Sept. 21, 2013. He remembers the entire sequence that led to the injury, down to the finest detail: how he was in one-on-one coverage with a tight end from Kansas State named Andrew McDonald, how McDonald took off on a corner route, how Hicks was right with him until McDonald gave him just the slightest shove, how Hicks gathered himself and planted his left foot to keep up his coverage, how the tendon ruptured and in that instant a bolt of pain made his body tremble and took him to the ground.
SPORTS
February 14, 2015 | By Rich Fisher, For The Inquirer
For years when she was a child, Cozette McAvoy would ask her mom for a pony. One day years later it hit her that, hey, a high-powered corporate lawyer can buy her own horse. Since that revelation, McAvoy has become an owner, trainer and breeder of harness racing horses. She even shoes her own horses. And while many lawyers own horses, it's not as common to find ones who train and shoe them. "I don't really know any other attorneys that do this," said McAvoy, a Coatesville resident who received her undergraduate degree from West Chester, a master's from Lehigh, and law degree from the University of Georgia.
SPORTS
December 26, 2014 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Angelo Mangiro left Roxbury (N.J.) High School as a four-star offensive lineman in football and a 3.5 student in the classroom. Other than a few struggles with reading and writing, the Penn State-bound Mangiro had little reason to believe something was holding him back from learning. That's why he was more than a bit surprised when, after taking a series of routine placement exams given to incoming students and some followup tests, he was diagnosed with dyslexia. Mangiro refused to let that slow him down, however.
NEWS
July 11, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Among the favorite tokens that the Rev. William "Jud" Weiksnar will take with him from his time in Camden is a collage of a small girl standing atop a mound of grass, created with shattered glass and litter cleared from Von Nieda Park. The "trash art" was one of the few remaining items in Weiksnar's parish office Tuesday as he packed up to move after nine years as pastor of St. Anthony of Padua Church. The image, created seven years ago by then-third grade student Soledad Velazquez, shows the girl and a godlike figure holding hands beneath an apple tree.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2014 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there On a summer afternoon in 2009 at an Ocean City Shore house, Bob's friend made an announcement about that evening's Atlantic City festivities: Several Eagles cheerleaders would be joining them. "It was like, 'Oh my God! Wow! This is great!' " remembered Bob, who grew up in Voorhees. He and the other dudes put down their beverages to prepare. "There were guys doing push-ups everywhere. " As soon as Jenna walked in, Bob whispered to his friend. "You really need to hook me up here.
NEWS
March 20, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seymour Holtman, 88, of Philadelphia, a veterinarian in Center City for three decades, died of congestive heart failure Saturday, March 15, at his home. Before retiring in 1980, Dr. Holtman practiced at the Animal Hospital on 20th Street, between Pine and Lombard. Previously, he had worked at Dr. Bachrach's Animal Hospital in the 5900 block of North Broad Street. "One of the things my father used to tell me was that when he opened his practice, he was one of four vets in the city," said his son Eli J. "When he retired, there were four in a three-block radius.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nicholas Sellers, 81, a lawyer, district justice, educator, and Army veteran who saw action during the Vietnam War, died of heart failure Saturday, Feb. 8, at the Hill in Whitemarsh, a continuing-care retirement community. Mr. Sellers worked as a lawyer and manager for several charitable and historical organizations, including the Society of Cincinnati of Maryland, a group devoted to preserving the legacy of those who fought for American independence. He also was a member of the First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry, which dates to 1774.
NEWS
November 13, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sister Anne Phyllis Ryan, 95, an educator and missionary who was a sister of the Holy Child Jesus for 74 years, died Thursday, Nov. 7, of respiratory failure at Holy Child Center in Rosemont, a nursing facility to which she had retired in 2004. Born in Rosemont and raised in Havertown, she graduated from West Philadelphia Catholic Girls' High School in 1936 and entered the Society of the Holy Child Jesus, where she professed her first vows in 1939 and her final vows in 1944. She admired the sisters for their fairness in how they treated students and their excellent teaching, she said in an online biography.
NEWS
May 24, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
LAST JUNE 1, there was a most unusual ceremony in an apartment in Gladwyne's Waverly Heights. There sat a distinguished looking 88-year-old gentleman dressed incongruously in cap and gown, and there stood Teresa Soufas, dean of Temple University's College of Liberal Arts, and vice dean Jayne Drake, both in full academic regalia. They were there to give Alfred Mayer Sellers a long-delayed bachelor's degree. What made the occasion even more incongruous was the fact that Alfred M. Sellers was Dr. Alfred Sellers, a prominent cardiologist, researcher and professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.
NEWS
May 21, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the last 13 years, Joan Mazzotti has made a public career of helping low-income, first-generation students from Philadelphia's public high schools get into and through college. Quietly, she and her husband, Michael Kelly, also have made it a personal mission in the case of two Haitian-born orphans, who received their degrees Sunday at Haverford College, a selective, liberal arts school on the Main Line. In true fashion as the stand-in parents they have become to Ralph and Ruben Alexis, Mazzotti and Kelly got to the ceremony early and staked out seats in the fourth row. They took video as Ralph Alexis, 21, a French major, stepped on stage at the Alumni Field House to receive his diploma along with nearly 300 graduates.
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