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NEWS
August 27, 1987 | New York Daily News
Federal prosecutors yesterday unveiled a novel legal weapon to rub out the Mafia by "hitting them in the pocketbook" and preventing recruitment of new members. Andrew Maloney, the U.S. attorney in Brooklyn, announced the filing of a multimillion-dollar civil suit to recover ill-gotten loot from the Bonanno crime family - with a new twist to allow a judge to prohibit the racketeers from inducting new "soldiers" or associating with each other in businesses. Maloney said FBI surveillance could be used to enforce the ban. The penalty for flouting a judge's injunction could be an open-ended jailing for criminal contempt of court.
NEWS
September 5, 1999 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian and Suman Pradhan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
In the archives of automotive marketing, Frank Ozga and Patrick Smith's gimmick probably should rank right up there with rebates, loaner cars and tent sales. The concept was an "Elite Line," a two-way communication system linking Ozga and Smith's Philadelphia auto-body repair shops to junkyards and body shops throughout Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware and Maryland. Instead of a time-consuming search for a hard-to-find car part to complete a customer's repair job, owners of local body shops just called Ozga and Smith's hotline, the part was quickly found and the order filled.
NEWS
March 2, 2000 | By Emilie Lounsberry, Angela Couloumbis and Barbara Boyer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
For nine weeks, they were jurors in U.S. v. Rivera - a captive audience in a chilling drama about drugs and murder, crooked police, and greedy cocaine dealers. And money. Lots of money. In the fifth-floor courtroom, they listened intently as one drug dealer after another described huge cocaine shipments and lucrative deals carried out by Camden's most notorious drug organization, and some dealers even testified that Mayor Milton Milan was once a player in the city's turbulent drug world.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1990 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
Frank Friel spent eight of his 28 years with the Philadelphia Police Department chasing mobsters. He studied their history in FBI files, heard their oral tradition from bad guy raconteurs like Harry "The Hunchback" Riccobene, visited their homes and haunts. He watched them, warned them, and put a lot of them in jail. He knows what makes them tick, even if he doesn't pretend to understand all of it. Why, for example, would a guy who was marked for death hang around the old neighborhood?
NEWS
February 9, 1993 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Confessed South Jersey hit man Willard "Junior" Moran heard about the murder of Mario Riccobene last week while sitting in a special wing of a federal prison somewhere in the United States. And even though he's been away from the Philadelphia area for more than a decade, Moran - like Riccobene, a cooperating government witness - knew immediately what it was all about. "It was a message to all of us," Moran, the triggerman in the 1980 murder of union boss John McCullough, said in a telephone interview.
NEWS
January 13, 1993 | By George Anastasia and John Way Jennings, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Rod Colombo lived in the fast lane. And that, law enforcement investigators are saying, makes it all the more difficult to determine how he ended up dead on a quiet, residential street in Audubon last week. Colombo, 29, had been living in South Philadelphia for the last year, according to authorities and family members. But his roots go back to the West Coast where he grew up and where, four years ago in Los Angeles he was tried and acquitted in the murder of a suspected drug dealer.
NEWS
September 23, 1993 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Jeff Gammage contributed to this article
He was, they said, a South Philadelphia bon vivant, a happy-go-lucky gambler, a legendary bartender who was known everywhere and knew everyone. What he wasn't, they added quickly, was a gangster. "No way," said a friend yesterday as he left the funeral Mass for Frank J. Baldino at St. Rita's Roman Catholic Church on South Broad Street. "This guy wasn't involved with this stuff. This never should have happened. " This, of course, was the Friday night ambush in the parking lot of the Melrose Diner that left Baldino, 50, riddled with bullets and slumped over the wheel of his late-model Cadillac.
NEWS
March 13, 2001 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
His name was Butchie. He was a low-level wiseguy who back in 1975 was suspected of skimming money from an organized-crime bookmaking operation in North Jersey. So his friends lured him to a social club on Hudson Street in Newark, offered him a drink at the bar, and shot him twice in the back of the head. Then they dumped his body in a grave already dug in the basement of the club. They poured acid over the body, covered it with dirt, and patched the hole in the floor with cement.
NEWS
April 11, 1993 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rosario Bellocchi, the suspected mob hit man charged with murder in Camden County last week, was angry. The Sicilian-born pizza maker stood with his hands cuffed behind his back during a March 29 preliminary hearing. A Montgomery County District Court judge had just refused to lower his $250,000 cash bail in a mob-related kidnapping case when he shouted: "What am I, an animal? I'm in jail, I didn't do nothing . . . What did I do?" Who Bellocchi is and what he has done are, in fact, two central questions in a broader organized crime investigation that sources say is aimed at bringing down reputed Philadelphia-South Jersey mob boss John Stanfa.
NEWS
August 6, 2014 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
THE YOUNG woman who befriended Tiffany on the Internet seemed innocent enough - so in the midst of a rough patch with her father, the 16-year-old Northeast Philadelphia girl let her new cyber-friend pick her up at home. When she got into the taxi on that fateful day in January 2006, Tiffany didn't know that she was stepping into a dark underworld of violence, drugs and sex slavery. The seemingly normal young woman she'd met on MySpace.com delivered her into the hands of Rahiim McIntyre, 36, a now-convicted violent sex trafficker who awaits sentencing in federal prison.
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