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IN THE NEWS

Underworld

ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2004 | By Rob Watson FOR THE INQUIRER
According to Underworld, there is war afoot, or should I say underfoot. A conflict between mystical vampires and werewolves is being waged in the subways, the vacant basements, and the gloomy mansions of a dark, rainy city, and while there are plenty of nods to and downright thievery from films such as those in the Blade and Crow series, fans of bloodsuckers and human-mongrel crossbreeds will agree, this DVD definitely doesn't lack for bite....
NEWS
June 11, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
An undercover TV journalist reporting on crime and drugs in Rio de Janeiro's shantytowns was tortured and put to death with a sword by a drug lord who runs his territory like a medieval fiefdom, police said yesterday. Tim Lopes, of the Globo television network, was captured June 2 as he tried to infiltrate a dance party in the Vila Cruzeiro shantytown in northern Rio, where gangs sold drugs and staged illicit sex shows. Lopes, 50, was taken to a nearby shantytown, Favela da Grota, where he was shot in the feet, beaten and killed with a Samurai-style sword by drug baron Elias Pereira da Silva, known as Elias Maluco, or Mad Elias, police said.
NEWS
March 13, 2001 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
His name was Butchie. He was a low-level wiseguy who back in 1975 was suspected of skimming money from an organized-crime bookmaking operation in North Jersey. So his friends lured him to a social club on Hudson Street in Newark, offered him a drink at the bar, and shot him twice in the back of the head. Then they dumped his body in a grave already dug in the basement of the club. They poured acid over the body, covered it with dirt, and patched the hole in the floor with cement.
NEWS
March 2, 2000 | By Emilie Lounsberry, Angela Couloumbis and Barbara Boyer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
For nine weeks, they were jurors in U.S. v. Rivera - a captive audience in a chilling drama about drugs and murder, crooked police, and greedy cocaine dealers. And money. Lots of money. In the fifth-floor courtroom, they listened intently as one drug dealer after another described huge cocaine shipments and lucrative deals carried out by Camden's most notorious drug organization, and some dealers even testified that Mayor Milton Milan was once a player in the city's turbulent drug world.
NEWS
February 16, 2000 | by Richard Vetere
Ask an Italian-American privately about prejudice, and you'll hear about the offhand remarks. I've had people express astonishment that I am the holder of a master's degree from an Ivy League college. I know businessmen who find people assuming that they must be linked to the mob. A woman I know found herself explaining to a date that no, she didn't owe her nice home in the suburbs to underworld connections. Among ourselves, we ask why we allow the stereotype to persist. Now, 30-odd years after "The Godfather," we have to decide how willingly we are going to tolerate "The Sopranos.
NEWS
September 5, 1999 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian and Suman Pradhan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
In the archives of automotive marketing, Frank Ozga and Patrick Smith's gimmick probably should rank right up there with rebates, loaner cars and tent sales. The concept was an "Elite Line," a two-way communication system linking Ozga and Smith's Philadelphia auto-body repair shops to junkyards and body shops throughout Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware and Maryland. Instead of a time-consuming search for a hard-to-find car part to complete a customer's repair job, owners of local body shops just called Ozga and Smith's hotline, the part was quickly found and the order filled.
LIVING
April 21, 1999 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the 1996 British movie Trainspotting, heroin addict hero Marc Renton, played by Ewan McGregor, comes to the realization that the rock music of his youth has given way to a brave new sound. "Music is changing," he decides. "The world is changing. " The song that leads Renton to this conclusion is a cacophonous dance track - "Born Slippy," by the trance-pop trio Underworld - that retains the character of rock and points the way to an electronic-music future. Aided by Trainspotting's success, "Born Slippy" became an international club anthem, appeared on dozens of electronica compilations, and led the media to hype Underworld as one of the British dance acts most likely to change the pop music world as we know it. But a funny thing happened to the members of Underworld - who play the Electric Factory tomorrow night - on the way to world domination: They decided they weren't in such a big hurry to get there.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1999 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After WCAU's sweeps-month expose on "private acts in public places," when NBC10 took hidden cameras into area men's rooms and was shocked, shocked! to find men soliciting sex, you probably thought you'd seen the last of the potty-cam. You'd be wrong. The Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation is demanding an apology from Fox Files, Fox's rock and roll newsmagazine, which last week sneaked cameras into bathrooms, clubs and condominiums in an Arthel Neville-hosted investigation of "a gay underworld full of confusion and bitterness.
NEWS
September 27, 1998 | By Bill Reed, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Central Pennsylvania is full of pleasant surprises. We've frolicked at old-fashioned Knoebels Amusement Park and toured quaint Victorian towns, including Boalsburg and Bellefonte. And then there's charismatic State College and its exciting neighbor, Penn State. Now we can add to our list of "discoveries" Penn's Cave, which calls itself "America's only all-water cavern and wildlife sanctuary. " The sights certainly are unique, especially the one-mile boat ride through a limestone cavern filled with magnificent natural formations.
NEWS
December 17, 1995 | By Michael Matza, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Christmas marks a year since James "Whitey" Bulger, Boston's most elusive gangster, skipped town to avoid charges that he extorted millions from a network of bookies, loan sharks and drug dealers. When Bulger vanished just days before a massive federal indictment, Whitey watchers throughout New England cracked wise about his future stake in lottery winnings that he had been paid: $119,408 a year. His "Mass Millions" prize, won in 1991, was slated to last through 2010. Now, Scroogelike in this holiday season, comes the U.S. attorney, who late last month won a decisive round in a legal battle to reroute Bulger's bounty into government hands.
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