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Underworld

NEWS
December 19, 1993 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For almost 20 years, authorities said last week, a former Cherry Hill plumbing contractor had gotten away with murder. Then one day this month, he met an old friend at a flea market near his new home in Boca Raton, Fla. And amid the trinkets and trifles of other people's lives, the past caught up with Irving Norton Singer. "He set up the perfect crime," one New Jersey law enforcement official said last week. "And then his own mouth beat him. " Singer, 68, was arrested Thursday at Newark International Airport and charged with the 1974 murder of his ex-wife Carol, a striking blond former cocktail waitress who was found brutally stabbed to death in the second-floor bedroom of their posh South Jersey home.
NEWS
September 23, 1993 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Jeff Gammage contributed to this article
He was, they said, a South Philadelphia bon vivant, a happy-go-lucky gambler, a legendary bartender who was known everywhere and knew everyone. What he wasn't, they added quickly, was a gangster. "No way," said a friend yesterday as he left the funeral Mass for Frank J. Baldino at St. Rita's Roman Catholic Church on South Broad Street. "This guy wasn't involved with this stuff. This never should have happened. " This, of course, was the Friday night ambush in the parking lot of the Melrose Diner that left Baldino, 50, riddled with bullets and slumped over the wheel of his late-model Cadillac.
NEWS
June 16, 1993 | By Monica Rhor, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some of them extort money from innocents. Some bring in heroin from overseas. Some use Bart Simpson's face or Nike sneakers as a kind of drug dealer's code. And some stomp their victims' skulls with a technique they call "sidewalk cracking. " They number more than 700, with enough members - 14,000 - to populate a small town, and enough ethnic backgrounds to rival the United Nations. They have their own language, methods of communications, rules and morals. They are underground societies that operate on fear.
NEWS
April 11, 1993 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rosario Bellocchi, the suspected mob hit man charged with murder in Camden County last week, was angry. The Sicilian-born pizza maker stood with his hands cuffed behind his back during a March 29 preliminary hearing. A Montgomery County District Court judge had just refused to lower his $250,000 cash bail in a mob-related kidnapping case when he shouted: "What am I, an animal? I'm in jail, I didn't do nothing . . . What did I do?" Who Bellocchi is and what he has done are, in fact, two central questions in a broader organized crime investigation that sources say is aimed at bringing down reputed Philadelphia-South Jersey mob boss John Stanfa.
NEWS
February 9, 1993 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Confessed South Jersey hit man Willard "Junior" Moran heard about the murder of Mario Riccobene last week while sitting in a special wing of a federal prison somewhere in the United States. And even though he's been away from the Philadelphia area for more than a decade, Moran - like Riccobene, a cooperating government witness - knew immediately what it was all about. "It was a message to all of us," Moran, the triggerman in the 1980 murder of union boss John McCullough, said in a telephone interview.
NEWS
January 13, 1993 | By George Anastasia and John Way Jennings, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Rod Colombo lived in the fast lane. And that, law enforcement investigators are saying, makes it all the more difficult to determine how he ended up dead on a quiet, residential street in Audubon last week. Colombo, 29, had been living in South Philadelphia for the last year, according to authorities and family members. But his roots go back to the West Coast where he grew up and where, four years ago in Los Angeles he was tried and acquitted in the murder of a suspected drug dealer.
NEWS
January 30, 1992 | By Howard Goodman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writers George Anastasia, Laurie Hollman and Joseph A. Slobodzian contributed to this article
He was the friendly old man who could be seen each day walking his dog around his South Philadelphia neighborhood, leaving his apartment at precisely the same time, getting a newspaper and then crossing East Passyunk Avenue for a cup of coffee. But this old man was no one to fool with. For nearly 50 years, authorities said, Felix Bocchino made his way as a gambler, swindler, drug trafficker, extortionist and long-surviving member of the Philadelphia mob. Yesterday, at age 73, that career ended violently.
NEWS
April 22, 1991 | By George Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mob boss Nicodemo "Little Nicky" Scarfo once explained to an associate how he was different from former Philadelphia Mafia chief Angelo Bruno. "Bruno was a racketeer," Scarfo said. "I'm a gangster. " The difference is underscored in the Pennsylvania Crime Commission's 1990 report, a 364-page document that tracks the rise and fall of the Scarfo crime family during the 1980s, the mob's most violent decade. Titled Organized Crime in Pennsylvania, a Decade of Change, the book is a veritable "Who's Who in the Underworld," and is expected to replace the commission's 1980 report as a major reference source for law enforcement agencies, academics and the media.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1990 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
"The Testament of Dr. Mabuse" at Film Forum/Philadelphia at the Philadelphia Center, 509 S. Broad St, at 7:30 tonight and 7 and 9:15 p.m. tomorrow. Tickets: $3.50; $2.50 members and full-time students. Phone: 732-7704. KESWICK THEATER 291 Keswick Ave, Glenside, 572-7650. Sun 1:30 p.m.: Show Boat, musical starring Irene Dunne, Allan Jones and Paul Robeson, and The Harvey Girls, musical starring Judy Garland. $5. REFLECTIONS ON THE WORLD University Museum of Anthropology & Archaeology, Harrison Auditorium, 33d & Spruce Sts, 898-4015.
NEWS
November 27, 1990 | BY DAVE BARRY
This week's Feminine Beauty Topic For Women is: Hair Care. In terms of appearance, hair is one of the most important features of a woman's entire body. In a recent survey, the Gallup organization asked 1,500 men what part of a woman they look at first, and they denied that they look at women at all, because their wives were standing right next to them. But they were lying. They definitely look at women, and one of the things they notice is hair. "Yes, that woman probably had hair," they'll say, if questioned.
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