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NEWS
June 27, 2011
THE EXPERTS WHO calculate these things say the Great Recession has been over for two years now. But you would have a hard time persuading the 25 million Americans who are unemployed or underemployed or too discouraged to even look for work. Or the countless others who fear they may join their ranks. Last week's report from the Labor Department confirmed what many Americans knew without needing a cable TV pundit to tell them: The mild improvement in job creation that we saw early this year is fading fast: First-time claims for unemployment benefits have been above 400,000 for the past 11 weeks, making for an official unemployment rate of 9.1 percent.
NEWS
April 26, 2009 | By Alfred Lubrano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At 7:25 a.m. on Feb. 20, Dan Perry arrived at work at his Malvern industrial-parts company, as he always did. Five minutes later, Perry's weeping supervisor told him that the company had eliminated his job of four years. By 7:35, Perry was back in the parking lot, holding a box containing a few items from his desk. In the gut-punch moments of nascent unemployment, Perry looked up at the sky and asked, "What just happened to me?" The married 49-year-old executive with two teenage children was filled with a cold dread.
NEWS
November 29, 2012 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
Great news, jobless Pennsylvanians. I've found folks feeling more tortured than you by the state unemployment system: New Jersey residents who worked across the river in Pennsylvania. Once upon a time, Elefterios "Lefty" Mitsos was a respected Philadelphia police officer. Now, the 72-year-old Voorhees resident makes the case that no voice is easier for the Corbett administration to ignore than that of an unemployed person living out of state. Readers may recall a trio of columns this fall about how myopic Harrisburg belt-tightening led to the firing of 100 unemployment call center workers in an already overtaxed system.
NEWS
December 16, 1990 | By Vyola P. Willson, Special to The Inquirer
Chester County has the lowest unemployment rate in Pennsylvania, even though unemployment is up. Unemployment rose from 2.5 percent in October 1989 to 3.5 percent in October 1990, according to state Department of Labor and Industry figures. Unemployment rose in the other Pennsylvania counties in the Philadelphia area as well. The greatest increases were in Philadelphia and Bucks Counties, according to the Labor and Industry Department. But all five counties are faring well in a softening economy, according to a department analyst.
NEWS
November 1, 1989 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Cutting bloated factory payrolls to comply with economic reform has cost three million Soviets their jobs since 1986, and the number could reach 16 million by 2005, Pravda said yesterday. In some southern Soviet republics wracked by ethnic violence, about 25 percent of the work force has been unemployed for the last three years, the Communist Party daily said. The Pravda article gave no overall jobless rate for the country, which has a work force of about 130 million. Moscow has never revealed overall unemployment figures, declaring for decades that full employment was a virtue of communism.
NEWS
April 9, 1991 | BY JULIA CARLISLE, From the New York Times
We are young, urban and professional. We are literate, respectable, intelligent and charming. But foremost and above all, we know what it's like to be unemployed. Forced into dishonesty to survive, we have bounced checks to keep ourselves in Oxford shirts and Ann Taylor dresses. But we have no solid ground. Our parents continue to help. Our grandparents send an occasional check. Some of us have trust funds, but the majority do not. Our parents must wonder, "My child turned 18, then 21, got the right to vote and to drink, graduated from college, found work, then was out of work - and we're still providing the support.
BUSINESS
January 4, 1991 | By Nancy Hass, Daily News Staff Writer The Associated Press and Reuters contributed to this report
Pennsylvania is among 28 states the Department of Labor says might not have enough money in unemployment compensation funds to last the year. The department said yesterday that the spreading recession and layoffs could bankrupt the compensation system in the Commonwealth and elsewhere. Officials at the Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry defended the fund's solvency. They say it should not be included among the troubled states. There is enough money, they say, to fund unemployment claims for the next 15 months.
NEWS
August 22, 1991 | By Jennifer Gould, Special to The Inquirer
Chester County's unemployment rate dropped slightly in June, another sign that the ailing economy is slowly recovering. June's job boom is especially encouraging because traditionally - even in more prosperous economies - unemployment usually rises in June, employment experts say. "It's kind of interesting. This doesn't usually happen," said Douglas Schmidt, director of the Chester County Job Center in Coatesville. That's because some seasonal workers, such as school cafeteria workers and bus drivers, collect unemployment benefits during the summer in June.
NEWS
December 17, 2001 | By JOHN DODDS
THE U.S. economy is now in a recession. October and November 2001 saw the largest increase in unemployment in over 20 years. The numbers of workers who have run out of their unemployment benefits is up 42 percent this year over the same period in 2000. Congress and the President are currently debating proposals to stimulate the economy. President Bush and Republicans in Congress are pushing a massive tax cut for corporations, with little help for the unemployed. Unemployed workers and supporters are calling for a stimulus package to aid the jobless.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1988 | Associated Press Daily News staff writer Kevin Haney contributed to this story
The unemployment insurance system has enough reserves to last only five months in a severe recession and would have to borrow billions of dollars from the federal government to keep paying benefits, congressional watchdogs said yesterday. Because states had to borrow $11.8 billion to keep paying benefits during the 1981-82 recession, most have tightened eligibility requirements so much that only one of every four jobless workers in October 1987 received unemployment checks, the General Accounting Office said in a report.
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NEWS
April 6, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The economy has generated enough private-sector jobs to replace all those lost during the recession, according to data released Friday by the U.S. Labor Department. That was the headline news in an otherwise solid, but unremarkable, report. The unemployment rate remained unchanged at 6.7 percent, and payroll jobs were up by 192,000 in March. In March, private-sector, nongovernmental jobs edged just above 116 million. Such jobs numbered just below 116 million when the recession began in December 2007.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
IT'S ONE thing for Hollywood to keep re-telling the story of Jesus or keep re-making Superman movies, but is it already time for another biopic on Steve Jobs ? The Ashton Kutcher version came out last year. TheWrap.com, however, reports that Christian Bale is David Fincher 's choice to play Jobs in a new untitled movie that Aaron Sorkin has written for Sony. Fincher recently met with Sony's Amy Pascal to discuss the possibility of directing the film, and told her, in no uncertain terms, that he'd helm the project only if Bale plays Jobs.
BUSINESS
March 23, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Unemployment in the Philadelphia metropolitan area rose in January to 7.1 percent, up from 6.4 percent in December, but down from 9 percent in January 2013, the U.S. Labor Department reported Friday. The figures are not adjusted for normal seasonal variations. Breaking it down, the unemployment rate in the Camden area, which consists of Camden, Gloucester, and Burlington Counties, was 7.9 percent, up from 7.0 percent in December, but down from 10 percent a year ago. Philadelphia and its four surrounding suburban counties also saw an increase, to 6.9 percent in January from 6.3 percent in December, but down from 8.9 percent in January 2013.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maybe if it were illegal to discriminate against the long-term jobless, and doing so led to stiff fines, Cheryl Spaulding would be more impressed with the pledge to hire the long-term jobless made by business executives at the White House on Friday. "Every little bit helps," said Spaulding, cofounder of Joseph's People, a network of support groups for the unemployed based in Philadelphia suburban churches. "The truth is that there is no incentive to hire these people, other than ethical and moral," she said.
NEWS
January 14, 2014
WE ELECT members of Congress to represent our interests and our views. Does that mean that Congress' view of Americans is, in fact, how we see ourselves? We hope not, because that view is unflattering, to say the least. Case in point: In December, more than a million people ran out of unemployment benefits, Congress having failed to pass an extension of federal jobless benefits that kick in after the typical 26-week state programs expire. Last week, the Senate advanced a bill that Republicans in the House say has little chance of passing.
NEWS
December 25, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dozens of unemployed people and their families dug into a fine holiday meal Monday - ham, mashed potatoes, baked beans, dessert by the tray load. The holiday party for the unemployed, who have no office festivities or pizza at the plant, has become an annual tradition at St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church in Downingtown, where a mission for the unemployed, now in its third decade, tends to the practical and psychological aftermaths of joblessness. "We do this party because these people don't have the capacity to do a Christmas party," said Cheryl Spaulding, one of the cofounders of St. Joseph's People, a network comprised of a dozen churches in the Philadelphia suburbs.
NEWS
December 18, 2013 | BY JOHN DODDS
THREE DAYS AFTER Christmas this year, 1.3 million laid-off American workers will see their unemployment benefits stopped. In Pennsylvania, the number will be 87,000 people drawing their last check on Dec. 28. "If my wife loses her benefit before she finds a job, we lose our house. " - Philadelphia resident These are working people caught in the worst economic crisis in more than 70 years, one that will not end. Unemployment in Pennsylvania is still 7.5 percent with 485,000 people officially unemployed.
NEWS
December 12, 2013 | BY CHARLES KENNY
  ALTHOUGH North America and Europe have finally emerged from the darkness of the global financial crisis, the economies of the West still lag behind those in the rest of the world. That's particularly the case when it comes to jobs. The unemployment rate in the United States, for example, remains stubbornly around 7 percent. In Chile, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Mexico and South Korea, however, the official unemployment rate is way lower. So here's a novel solution to America's problem: Move the people to where the jobs are. Exporting the unemployed may sound radical, even cruel, but the quest for jobs has been a driving force behind global migration - and population growth in the New World - for centuries.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2013 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
October's jobless rate, pegged Friday at 7.3 percent, was up slightly from September. But the number's meaning is a source of monthly public confusion. Here are some explanations. The arm of government that computes the unemployment rate is the Labor Department's Bureau of Labor Statistics. This FAQ on the bureau's site explains how the number is reached and what it means. It starts with the question "Why does the government collect statistics on the unemployed?" When a willing worker is unemployed, everybody loses, it explains.
BUSINESS
November 7, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The administrative infrastructure supporting state unemployment benefit systems is collapsing due to chronic underfunding by the federal government. The result, according to a study released by the National Employment Law Project on Tuesday, is a system ill-equipped to handle the demands of the recession's lingering effects. "States work very, very hard to pay benefits, but they are doing it with one hand tied behind their backs," said Rebecca Dixon, a policy analyst with the New York-based advocacy group, which focuses on employment issues.
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