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Unemployment Compensation

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NEWS
March 15, 2001 | by April Adamson Daily News Staff Writer
They boarded a bus in Philadelphia yesterday morning and headed to Harrisburg, frustrated and ready to demand change. And once they arrived, the two dozen unemployed people and their supporters fanned out in the Capitol building, delivering information packets and lobbying 42 state legislators to help change the state's unemployment-compensation phone system. Members of the Philadelphia Unemployment Project, which sponsored the bus trip, and the Philadelphia Social Services Union had three demands: Put people in unemployment offices for face-to-face service.
NEWS
December 1, 2011
Is it right for ex-Philadelphia schools chief Arlene Ackerman to file for unemployment compensation?
BUSINESS
July 27, 1988 | By Gary Thompson, Daily News Staff Writer
The repayment of Pennsylvania's unemployment compensation debt to the federal government should be the state's top priority this year, representatives of small businesses said yesterday. The call for accelerated repayment of the debt was issued at a special meeting of more than 800 business leaders from across the state who attended Gov. Casey's Small Business Conference in Hershey. If the state repays $194 million in unemployment compensation owed the federal government before Nov. 10, Pennsylvania businesses will avoid paying $272 million in federal tax penalties.
NEWS
October 10, 1986 | By HOWARD SCHNEIDER, Daily News Staff Writer
City Councilman Thacher Longstreth was awarded a bag of pennies and dubbed a modern-day "Sheriff of Nottingham" yesterday by labor activists angered at his efforts to change state unemployment compensation laws. About 50 sign-carrying union members and unemployed workers gathered in City Council chambers yesterday to protest Longstreth's chairmanship of the Coalition for the True Reform of Unemployment Compensation, a loose collection of business organizations that unveiled a 19-point unemployment compensation reform program in April.
NEWS
April 15, 1988 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The last of 34 South Jersey cement masons admitted in federal court in Camden yesterday that they used false Social Security numbers to deceive New Jersey and the Internal Revenue Service. The masons, who gathered at the federal courthouse in Camden yesterday, Tuesday and Wednesday were accused of giving false Social Security numbers, and in some cases false names, to various contractors who employed them on short-term cement-finishing jobs while they were improperly collecting unemployment compensation.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1994 | by Anthony S. Twyman, Daily News Staff Writer
The 2,482 PECO Energy Co. employees who agreed to waive their rights last month to file for unemployment compensation in return for either buyouts or early-retirement benefits may have a problem. While state officials say that PECO cannot prohibit workers from filing for unemployment compensation, PECO's waiver says, if they do, the company will require them to pay back the buyout or early-retirement benefits. PECO, in an effort to trim its work force of 9,300 and restructure its company, offered three weeks pay for every year of service, up to a maximum of 65 weeks, or early retirement for workers 50 or older with at least five years of service.
NEWS
June 25, 1986 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
A coalition of labor unions, church and community groups yesterday denounced a business-backed effort to reform Pennsylvania's unemployment compensation system, contending that it would deny or reduce unemployment benefits for many of the more than 100,000 jobless workers. At a news conference held outside a state unemployment office in North Philadelphia, opponents of the proposed changes also burned a pair of argyle socks, symbolic of the argyles worn by City Councilman Thacher Longstreth, statewide chairman of the drive.
NEWS
July 16, 2010
Calling all employers: Over the last several months, I've occasionally heard the claim made that businesses can't find people to work for them, because they would rather collect unemployment benefits. We want to hear from these employers, because we have half a million people out of work right now whom we can refer to you. With four to five workers available for every job opening, I've personally spoken to many unemployed workers, and I can tell you they want to work. They've reported sending out dozens of resumes a week.
NEWS
April 1, 1987 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Secretary of Labor and Industry Harris L. Wofford Jr. said yesterday that a committee of government, business and labor leaders would consider ways to eliminate the state's $591 million unemployment-compensation debt. In an appearance before the House Appropriations Committee and later at a Pennsylvania Chamber of Business and Industry meeting, Wofford said the new committee would push for ways to retire the debt to the federal government early, thus saving businesses $272 million in penalty taxes.
NEWS
July 20, 1990 | By Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The judge said he was tired of people "thumbing their noses at the court" and refusing to abide by orders to repay money they swindled from the state in unemployment compensation. So, to make his point, Municipal Judge Arthur S. Kafrissen yesterday jailed three offenders, including a payroll clerk for the Board of Education, for 30 days apiece "to send out the message that this will no longer be tolerated. " All three had previously pleaded guilty to illegally collecting unemployment compensation.
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NEWS
January 14, 2014
WE ELECT members of Congress to represent our interests and our views. Does that mean that Congress' view of Americans is, in fact, how we see ourselves? We hope not, because that view is unflattering, to say the least. Case in point: In December, more than a million people ran out of unemployment benefits, Congress having failed to pass an extension of federal jobless benefits that kick in after the typical 26-week state programs expire. Last week, the Senate advanced a bill that Republicans in the House say has little chance of passing.
NEWS
November 26, 2013
Congressional inaction could put more obstacles in the path of the already slow economic recovery. If lawmakers don't extend the Emergency Unemployment Compensation program, $25 billion in benefits - money that tends to be quickly spent on rent, food, and other necessities - would be ripped out of the economy. The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office says the program is a highly effective antirecession measure. An estimated 1.3 million long-term-unemployed Americans are expected to lose the emergency benefits in December if Congress doesn't act. Another 850,000 could join them before next spring.
NEWS
August 22, 2013 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A lifelong friend and business partner to State Rep. Bill Keller was sentenced Tuesday to three months in prison for cheating on his taxes and lying to collect unemployment checks he did not deserve. "If everybody did what you did, we'd have chaos," U.S. District Judge Harvey Bartle III told Mark Olkowski, rejecting his request for a sentence that did not include prison. Olkowski, 62, pleaded guilty in April to hiding more than $148,000 in off-the-books income from KO, the real estate venture and sporting-goods store he and Keller launched in 1975.
NEWS
June 8, 2013 | By Megan Rogers, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - To those who mistakenly - or not so mistakenly - received unemployment compensation benefits to which they weren't entitled, Pennsylvania wants its money back. In an effort to reclaim $613 million due to the fund, the state Department of Labor and Industry is rolling out what it says is the nation's first unemployment compensation amnesty program. "We need to secure this trust fund so it's there when people need it," Labor and Industry Secretary Julia Hearthway said at a news conference in the Capitol on Thursday.
NEWS
January 31, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Perpetually busy telephone lines, long waits for claims, and staff layoffs are among the difficulties state legislators say are preventing thousands of their constituents from getting unemployment compensation checks in a timely fashion. At a hearing Tuesday, state Labor Secretary Julia K. Hearthway said that federal budget cuts and aging computer and phone systems - possibly even sabotage - were to blame for the troubles, and that the agency was working to fix the problem.
NEWS
October 10, 2012
Survivors of Auschwitz I agree with Andrew Klosinski, William Ecenbarger's Polish guide at Auschwitz, who said that "the horrors of this place are unbelievable" ("Drawn to Auschwitz," Sunday). However, I strongly disagree with his statement, "There are no longer survivors to tell their stories. " Indeed, there are still survivors from Auschwitz, and we must do all that we can to exchange with them now and hear their eyewitness accounts. In Philadelphia, on Oct. 21, Temple Beth Zion-Beth Israel will hold a program to honor the Holocaust survivors in its congregation.
NEWS
October 8, 2012 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
After back-to-back columns about the Corbett administration's forcing unemployed people to waste weeks listening to busy signals, I'm thrilled to throw a glimmer of light into the bureaucratic black hole Pennsylvania's jobless call home. If you, too, have been stymied by the Department of Labor and Industry (or any other state agency), you can ring a human being who will listen to your agony and take up your case. For free. These angels toil anonymously in each county of the commonwealth.
NEWS
December 6, 2011
ARLENE Ackerman will not go away. In Act Two of her Marie Antoinette act, Ackerman was not satisfied with the nearly $1 million golden-parachute buyout that she extracted from the Philadelphia School District. As a final insult, she has attempted to shake down the taxpayers for pin money: $573 in weekly unemployment compensation. This shameless, chintzy move does not surprise me, nor does the fact that the School Reform Commission won't oppose it, or even that defenders of the great educator, like Councilwoman Jannie Blackwell, will try to stifle debate on this.
NEWS
December 1, 2011
Is it right for ex-Philadelphia schools chief Arlene Ackerman to file for unemployment compensation?
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